17

There are several ways you can tackle this: There are over-the-counter treatments for head lice that you can get at most local pharmacies and grocery stores. You can also get a lice comb and pick out the nits and eggs by hand. However, you have to be VERY thorough; one missed egg can mean an re-infestation. Depending on where you're located, there are ...


16

From what I've heard from friends and acquaintances, it's pretty normal that a kid going to some kind of organized childcare (kindergarten, school, whatever) for the first time will get ill more often than usual; the reasoning behind this is that due to the many kids in one place, it's also easier to get viruses transmitted. The immune system of a kid who ...


16

Yes, it's uncomfortable. No, it's not a concern. My personal experience (having traveled many thousands of km/miles in the summertime as a child) is that high temperatures while driving is not a serious concern. When you don't have A/C, then your best defense against heat is to be smart: Passengers will be thirsty. Bring lots of drinking water, but avoid ...


13

No! While symptoms may be mild or nonexistent at onset, the existence of antibodies may be a contributor to a whole host of psychological and nervous conditions. Authors of an article titled Latent Toxoplasmosis and Humans (retrieved from the National Institute of Health database) review 42 studies of latent toxoplasmosis (asymptomatic), which established ...


11

Oh, yes, that's normal for kids who have just started going to school/preschool etc. Quite simply, there are hundreds, if not thousands of cold and flu viruses circulating in society. As adults, we've already built resistance to the many we've encountered over our lifetimes, so we won't be carriers for those germs and pass them on to our kids, because the ...


8

Not entirely on topic but still relevant. My wife contracted Toxoplasmosis while she was pregnant with our 3rd child. It all ended well but it was one heck of a cliffhanger and could easily have resulted in our daughter being severely handicapped or dead. We have no idea how my wife contracted it. So a few pointers may be helpful for others: Get yourself ...


7

Monica Cellio's answer already mentions recommendations if you own a cat and most of all that you're much more likely to contract toxoplasmosis through undercooked meat (most of the contamination cases) and gardening — you may add insufficiently washed legums and fruits. There are much more informations on the CDC website. I feel it's also important to ...


6

I will add to Mary Jo Finch's excellent answer that toxoplasmosis can make you quite miserable if you get it. It is one of the three known viruses that cause symptoms that we know as mononucleosis. And as you probably know, the older you are, the longer the immune reaction (i.e. horrible tiredness) is likely to last. From the wiki page: Enlarged lymph ...


6

This does not, on the face of it, sound terribly unusual. She has probably not fully recovered yet. If she is still feeling ill, it makes sense for her to be cranky. Wouldn't you be? If she is breastfeeding regularly, she may not need more food. Even if she normally eats other food, during stomach problems hunger is often reduced, so she may not want more. ...


6

Getting someone into the habit of doing anything requires repetition, as that is what a habit is largely: a settled or regular tendency or practice. The best way to establish a habit in a child from my experience is to gently remind them to do the habitual action immediately after the "cue" for the action. In this case, it would be to: Hear your child ...


5

This should not be a problem at all. The person likely to suffer from Zika id the person traveling to affected areas. Zika may cause microcephaly in fetuses, that is, while the baby is in utero. Once the baby has been born, it can't contract a birth defect per se. It can contract the illness, but not enough is known to say the illness would be any different ...


5

Please elaborate: Are you going to spend 4 days&nights on a cruise ship, going to this island and back again, or are you going to stay on the island for 4 days? If you're staying on the island, would that be in a big all-inclusive hotel, or in an apartment where you'll do your own cooking etc.? Also, what's a "significant risk" to you? If you'll spend ...


5

Firstly I'd like to say- congratulations to you both on getting this far through and doing as well as you have. Now- I have been through this exact situation, near enough- my Father was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer when I was about 6 months from doing my GCSEs -However there is some difference as he was a single parent. For my part, I can say that the ...


4

Cozumel is lovely, but it can be very hot. Sunscreen, plenty of drinks, a hat and sandals for the beach are absolutely essential. It felt safe enough and there were plenty of families there (I stayed mostly at an all-inclusive, going on diving tours). As a tourist destination, the main threats are pick-pockets and being ripped off when buying stuff at a ...


4

As you are talking about life-changing news for your wife, I don't believe that you can actually hide the emotions that come with getting the good or bad news. Assuming that your daughters are aware of the battle against cancer, I would recommend to try to discuss with them to adjust their revision schedules for the exams such that they can have a couple of ...


4

I am speaking as a daughter here. I have not been in an actual similar situation, the things my parents tried to hide from me did happen after I left home for university so I was older(but similarly, they decided to let me know after my exams for that term) and it was not that serious (at least it developed all positively, one situation could have gotten ...


3

This is the 2010 paper discussed in the CNN article: Côté SM, Petitclerc A, Raynault M, et al. Short- and Long-term Risk of Infections as a Function of Group Child Care Attendance: An 8-Year Population-Based Study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(12):1132-1137. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.216. Children contract infections around the time they ...


3

This is from a recent experience, not a pediatrician advice. I have a 8.5 month old daughter, underweight. She had a slight cold at the time but she's usually pretty though (my wife caught a minor pneumonia while our daughter coughed twice...). We did a 6 hours trip one week ago. Both for our kid and us, we took a stop every 2 hours (it's a common ...


3

This can happen for a while, but it's not normal on the long term. So, if you child continues to get ill every month, month after month, then there may a medical problem that needs attention. E.g. the child may be deficient in some vitamins and minerals, e.g. iron deficiency which most people know can cause anemia, may also compromise the immune system, ...


3

We discovered that in spite of a sore throat, our infant enjoys eating ice cubes. We thus freeze milk or water into thin ice cubes using an ice cube tray or a small cup, and break it into small pieces to feed the infant. Here is a quote from an adult who tried this method (see link) to treat his own sore throat: For day-time relief, ice-cubes have been a ...


3

Emetophobia is unfortunately very common. (The reference linked starts with the DSM-IV definition of emetophobia. For those who cannot click through, it's a phobia of vomiting.) Before we get to the plethora of links, I want to strongly recommend a therapist, one who is familiar with the treatment of phobias and panic disorders. Any therapist who ...


3

I always had an "iron stomach," until I became a mother. In the first two years of my daughter's life I was sick 5 times with norovirus or something similar, once I had to go to the ER for IV fluids and twice I got sick, recovered and then relapsed. Besidss that, I was frequently sick with URI's. This is what I learned from my MD and my Naturopath: During ...


3

I've had a similar experience, but been told I was crazy for connecting the pregnancy to my post-pregnancy stomach problems (8.5 months of sever nausea to the point I did need help getting re-hydrated, ceasarian heartburn etc during pregnancy and then easily made naseausous after). So, even though I've never heard of it - I too, have experienced it. ...


3

Yes, it is absolutely safe. At age 5 and 6, the kids are old enough to make a fuss if they are not ok. Keep water with them and they will drink as they are required. If you are worried they will not drink enough, give them a packet of chips for the ride and the salt will sure get them drinking.


3

I feel for you, unfortunately I don't think there's an answer in this forum that will give you that type of assurance. Few of the people on this forum are medical professionals, and those that are won't be able to really give you any assurance one way or the other by reading descriptions of symptoms. As babies cannot talk it's very hard to know how they ...


2

Your colds would sound a lot worse too if you couldn't clear your throat or blow your nose. What to look out for is going to vary by child and by the situation. A pediatrician may give very different advice during RSV season than other times of the year, for example. Also, generally parents rely on doctors less as they gain experience with their own ...


2

There are a few things at work here, that seem to be combined in your question. The first is the concept that your child should be exposed to diseases at a younger age in order to avoid sickness at an older age. Much of your immune system works such that once you are exposed to a particular antigen (such as a protein from a virus or a bacteria), you ...


2

From your description, suctioning the mouth is not what you need, in fact there are only a very few cases where it useful to suction the mouth at all. Loosening the phlegm from the lungs/throat can be relatively straightforward. Steaming a room as you have been doing should help, but what worked for us was to have our baby lying gave down across my knees, ...


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