Hot answers tagged

79

Zero distance in someone’s lap. In an accident baby will become a missile and escape the grip... If the baby is in a properly installed, rated car seat then fine, otherwise how would many parents get babies out of hospital? Make the baby comfortable, have sufficient food, stop for breaks as necessary. Natural is easiest... otherwise you need warm water ...


38

As mentioned, a baby should never travel in the car by anything but a child seat that is properly installed (preferably rear-facing). Do not take them out of the seat for any reason while driving: Not to feed, not to console them, not for anything but extreme situations. Always pull over first or find a parking spot. Accidents only require a fraction of a ...


30

Travelling with newborns is not the safest option, but it can be done: Carrying the baby in your wife's (or anybody else's) lap should be avoided at all costs. If you e.g. brake just a bit harder than usual, the baby could slip from the lap and get hit in the head etc. Get yourself a proper baby seat. It doesn't need to be expensive or new, but it needs to ...


19

We did a 9 hour haul from Germany to Denmark with a 6 weeks old and a one year old. No issues or problems. A few things to consider Two adults makes this A LOT easier. You can take turns driving, have a conversation and there are always an available pair of hands for the kids. Pack properly: water, food, books, toys, books on tape, diaper, change of cloth, ...


16

Yes, it's uncomfortable. No, it's not a concern. My personal experience (having traveled many thousands of km/miles in the summertime as a child) is that high temperatures while driving is not a serious concern. When you don't have A/C, then your best defense against heat is to be smart: Passengers will be thirsty. Bring lots of drinking water, but avoid ...


12

First off, this is not medical or legal advice, and no answer from a site like this should be relied upon; ask your pediatrician for the best advice. It is never safer for a child to sit in the front seat. (Similarly, it is never safer for an adult; the rear seat is simply safer in general.) The recommendations of child safety organizations are generally ...


11

Anecdotally, our experience of flying with a three month old infant (which we've tried twice; or one round-trip) has been very smooth. Yes, crowded airports may be a concern. We tried to find calm areas while waiting for our flight. Check your specific airport, there are sometimes designated nursing lounges. During boarding, we had her facing inwards in a ...


10

I don't fault your parents for wanting everyone to come visit. Once kids get older and move out it becomes harder and harder to get everyone together, to have one more moment together as a family. That desire to have some more of something that made them happy isn't wrong. And the holidays are usually a good time for such things because many people get/...


10

I think you're right in your concerns about confusing your baby. It's a good idea to wait until you get back from your trip to start sleep training unless you are going the "Extinction with parental presence" route (which is not consistent with CIO). As an alternative to CIO, there is "Ferberizing", which is far more work for the parents but maybe better ...


9

When navigating subways and escalators with a toddler or older infant with good head, neck, and back control, you want a lightweight, compact umbrella stroller that you can quickly and easily fold closed and open, and a hinge, hook, or clasp that you can engage to keep it shut when carrying it closed. You can even carry your child and the folded up stroller ...


9

I would suggest a reminder that "correlation does not imply causation." When my daughter was around that age, I didn't have a car and it was a 30 minute bus ride to-and-from home. One day, she woke up in my arms, smiled at me, and promptly threw up all over my chest. It was A LOT!!!! I got off at the next stop and unprepared to have to change my clothes (...


9

I have been a part of CISV for over 15 years and involved with many programmes, unfortunately not interchange but I do know several people who have participated in interchange and found it very enjoyable and rewarding. The skills I have learnt from CISV have been invaluable and I have enjoyed the rewarding activities I have been lucky enough to participate ...


9

As an experienced "road tripper", I believe an 8 hour driving day with a 10 week old will be very challenging, I would split that day into two days. With a child at that age I would be prepared to stop at least once every 2 hours. You will not be able to schedule all your stops because you can not predict the babies schedule at that age. You might stop at a ...


8

As requested, an addendum to Torben's answer as regards to cosmic radiation: The exposure due to cosmic radiation is actually about two chest X-ray images per flight, or 40 uSv, depending on flight height, latitude, and length. At 10000 flights, there would be definitely apparent effects, known as 'deterministic effects' because they can be traced directly ...


8

Try making it an exciting part of the vacation. "When we're visiting Fun Destination, we get to sleep in a hotel!" Don't focus exclusively on it, of course (who takes vacations just for the mattresses?), but get him used to the idea that it's part of the whole fun vacation experience. I don't know how typical my kids are in this respect, but they find all ...


8

First off check that it is possible, I know some airplanes have rules about minimum ages for unaccompanied minors, so you may want to check. Also, don't assume you can take them to and pick them up from the gate - I know some airports do not issue gate passes any more. Check with the airports. If you can't you may have to purchase an unaccompanied minor ...


8

Babies are pretty adaptable, and lets face it largely blissfully unaware of anything beyond their immediate surroundings and physical needs as they exist in the moment. So will your baby get any enrichment? No, it will not remember it. At all. Exposure to travel might help make for a more situationaly adaptable child if you continue to travel, but one trip ...


7

I don't believe that there are any particular health risks specifically associated with flying. What factors do you consider as health-related? Noise level? Airplanes are loud, and a long flight will be a nuisance to anyone's ears, but the noise level is nowhere near a medical concern. Air pressure? Healthy ears can equalize the air pressure in the cabin....


7

There might also be drawers and closet doors to open, and just maybe a hard corner on a table -- but generally, as GdD says, hotel rooms are pretty safe. I'm guessing the reason is a mix of insurance safety, and theft prevention. There simply isn't a lot to move around or pick up. The biggest problem is more likely the matter of the baby monitor's poor ...


7

What my husband and I have discovered recently is that your requirements can change significantly between child 1 and child 2. When we bought my car (6 years ago), it was a significant step up in size from my 4-door sedan to a full-size 2-row SUV. My son was born a year later. My daughter was born in July 2010 and my car, which obviously hasn't changed in ...


7

Toddlers can be in the car for quite a long time, there's no set guideline - it depends on the child. As for routines that also depends on the child. I think what's happening is that your child is getting bored of long car trips. 3-5 hours is a long time for a child to be sitting without toys or entertainment. I'd suggest getting him some car friendly toys,...


7

@anongoodnurse's answer is great, but I want to add some things from personal observation: I have flown with a baby as young as 4 months, and it was not an issue. The younger the baby is the easier, since they sleep more. I think a 7 week baby will be fine (provided no health issues, not pre-mature and so forth). ask you pediatrician if there is any ...


7

If your pregnancy is healthy (uterus size is on target with dates, no bleeding or placental abnormalities on ultrasound, a singleton pregnancy, etc), you should be fine until starting to get close to the due date (where do you want to have your baby, at home or in another city? Or, worse yet, do you want to go into labor on the plane?) Still, it's best to ...


6

As nobody has mentioned it yet, Take care of yourself. A tired jetlagged parent will not effectively parent to a 20 month old. See also a useful Question on Travel.


6

As DA01 mentions in his comments, autism is a gigantic spectrum. Strategies for how to deal with it vary widely - the person who could best answer this question would likely be the child's mother. It may be an uncomfortable question, but it's likely one that the child's mother is familiar with answering by now. If you're worried about coming across as ...


6

Take option 1. First, let the other passengers waiting know what are doing. Make sure that both parents go to the bathroom. One parent stands outside supplying wipes, a bag for the poopy nappy, etc etc, the other does the dirty work. Make sure you have plenty of wipes, a plastic bag for the nappy, a bag for any clothes that get soiled, a fresh change of ...


6

Please note that some airlines will not let you breastfeed on a flight, regardless of what is said when you purchase a ticket. For the first few weeks of a newborn's life, usually the baby's doctor prefers that she be kept in relative isolation (friends and family). Flying is a particular risk because of crowding and recirculated air. After that, it's ...


6

(I am a CISV volunteer, but will be objective in my response) As mentioned by the others, CISV is a non-sectarian UNESCO partner non-profit organisation. I personally only joined as an adult volunteer in 2013, and can understand how it may initially seem like a sect to outsiders (if fact, this is something we might joke about ourselves, sometimes) - we ...


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