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73

Summary Grapes are round and larger than a child's airway and may lead to occlusion. Food with a smooth, deformable surface can form a tight seal. Grapes are "the third most common cause of food-related fatal choking episodes". Children below 5 years of age don't chew as good yet. Grapes should be cut up for children. This is mostly about grapes, not ...


61

A slightly more scientific perspective. A study done called 'You Will Eat All of That! (A retrospective analysis of forced consumption episodes)' found that pressuring children into finishing their food may lower their natural appetite (perhaps because they're being told when and how much to eat, rather than learning naturally). Other studies have also ...


35

This parent is of the strong opinion that if the kid does not eat a proper amount for every meal, on a structured timetable the kid will fall behind (growth wise, intelligence wise, discipline wise). Simply put, this parent is wrong. Pressuring children to eat is not only unnecessary, but actively harmful: studies have shown that it leads children to both ...


34

About 3 weeks ago we took her to the doctor for her MMR vaccination and since then we noticed that she gradually lost her appetite and refused to eat. The timing of this change in appetite is obviously somewhat alarming to you. Parents often have a pretty good sense of if their children are truly ill (or different.) You've seen two doctors now who have ...


27

Give him a sensibly-sized splodge on the side of his plate and then put the bottle back in the cupboard and don't get it out again that mealtime.


23

The problem with issues like table manners is twofold: first, you want your children to behave appropriately; but second, you also want your children to choose to behave appropriately. Teaching the first is not all that difficult; punishments, delivered appropriately, will certainly yield a result eventually. Teaching the second, however, won't necessarily ...


20

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


19

Another anecdote, from an Asian background. When I was growing up, we generally wouldn't have individual portions set out for us on our plates at mealtimes. All the food would be seen as "shared" food - it would be set out in the middle of the table, and we'd start off with a plate of rice (often dished out by negotiation) and help ourselves and others to ...


18

The balance of power is very one-sided in a parent/child relationship. Children have very little power unless allowed by the parents. Probably you are giving her too much power because you want the outcome more than she does. The way to take it back is to find something she wants more, and take it away, or something she hates even worse, and make her ...


15

Don't buy salad cream anymore.


14

I have four adult children, and we played food-as-airplane with all of them. While it's true that they all lost weight upon entering college as they struggled with learning to feed themselves without our entertainment, I can say that they have all achieved normal weight and are adept at self-feeding now. OK, that was an attempt at a joke. :-) Play airplane ...


14

One reason grey snow might be preferred is that it probably has a little salt in it. I would take this as an opportunity for fun. Take her out with a bowl and show her how to "collect the best eating snow" using the same tone and excitement that you might use when showing her how to pick vegetables in the garden. Find untouched snow and show how to ...


14

I don't mind giving them more, but when I do they barely eat any of it. Then pack it up, and offer it the next time they ask for more. Or keep healthy snacks like cheese and raisins available without having to ask.


13

Here's my $0.02: I assume that a healthy child knows when it is hungry and when it is not. Reasoning from there, it seems to me that talking kids into eating when they do not feel hungry does harm, as it would hinder this self-consideration to develop. However, I also assume that a healthy child at 4 is able to learn that there are meals and that meals ...


13

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


13

The main concern with eating bananas is constipation. Bananas are extremely sweet, and that can be somewhat dehydrating (which is the leading cause of constipation). If they're eaten in an unripe state (a ripe banana is yellow with some brown speckles), they may also be harder to digest, as their starch content is higher. However, how that affects your ...


11

This kind of depends on what you consider good eating-habits. Having your meal in courses is really a cultural thing. I am currently failing to come up with actual sources, not second hand notices, but is seems like Arabian countries as well as Thailand do not know "courses" as we do. As long as doing this does not lead to her eating MORE dessert, she ...


11

Some kids are "grazers", especially at those ages - they tend to want to eat small portions almost constantly. My youngest (now 6) constantly wanted food until about a year ago, and even within the last year has had flashes of his grazer phase. He used to eat 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a mid afternoon snack, and dinner. Although by the time dinner rolled ...


10

Thoughts based on experience: You have taken him to the doctor and been told they found nothing wrong, but if this persists, do not be afraid to take him back to the doctor, especially with your concerns of additional weight loss. If you do not have faith that your doctor is correct for whatever reason, you perhaps can see another doctor for a second ...


10

At 6 yrs old he is definitely old enough to start understand the basics of healthy eating. Smothering sauce on things isn't healthy (as you do seem concerned about). So sit down and talk to him. Tell him that sauce is an extra and isn't healthy in large quantities. Tell him there is a time an a place for things and that he needs to learn when certain sauces ...


10

I feel stuck as I can't see a solution that fits my desired parenting style whilst maintaining my sanity, not being too upset with my son and getting enough sleep to function at work. You are stuck, because you have conflicting desires/goals here. Prioritizing is painful when you want so much for your baby, yet it results in a significant cost to you. But ...


10

I admire you for both recognizing the problem and seeking help. Single parenting is difficult; changing your daufghter's eating patterns will demand even more from you. :( First, though, comfort eating is not an eating disorder. That's kind of like saying loneliness is a mood disorder. Neither is a disorder; both indicate an unmet need. Both should be ...


9

If they are getting the same food later, it's not like they are holding out for something better. In my opinion, I wouldn't force them to eat more than they want to. What we do with my son (who would rather play than eat) is make him sit at the table until everyone is done eating. That way if he's not hungry, fine, he doesn't have to eat. But he doesn't ...


9

Absolutely do not insist on finishing a meal, especially if you're the one who determined the portion size. Your child may be genuinely full, and you're going to feel horrible if she throws up as a result of you overstuffing her against her will. (It can happen! She probably won't know how to tell you if she is feeling ill.) It's pretty difficult for ...


9

This definitely sounds like a problem you may need to approach the doctors with. If she's truly not eating sufficiently for a long period of time, you need to find out why; there are some conditions that manifest as an unwillingness to eat. She may also be allergic to something common which is causing digestive upset. On the other hand, she may just be ...


9

Worry is a normal part of parenting. Internet advice from another parent may help, but do try and take comfort in the current diagnosis from your local doctors. Babies, children, and even adults go through phases of liking and disliking foods, phases of wanting to eat lots and wanting to eat little. Last week, my daughter would barely pick at her food. ...


9

It could be that the open-ended question of "what do you want to eat" is too difficult for him, and listing everything in the cupboard is overwhelming. See if he could more easily answer a choice type of question like "do you want peas or broccoli? and with that do you want rice or pasta? And if he still doesn't answer, provide him with a variety (4 or 5) ...


9

For one, I'd get a plastic mat you can put under the high chair, you can always carry that later to the bathtub and clean it off. I don't think it's going to be too hard to get him to eat at the table. If he throws a fit, or tosses his food away, he's clearly not hungry enough...yet. When he's hungry enough, he's going to eat! Don't give in and take him ...


9

At a guess, your girl has discovered the power of "No". She will not starve herself, so try letting her run away. Ignore her. She will not go far. Then she will get hungry, and will want food and also your attention. Let her have food and attention once she is sitting in the high chair. Once you have the high chair established you can work on regular ...


9

Offer your child a variety of food, mostly healthy. Do not limit the amount of healthy food. Restrictive feeding of children by parents is associated with eating in the absence of hunger (inability to self-regulate), a known risk factor for obesity (Johnson & Birch, 1994, Birch et al., 2003). Keep track of where your child is on the growth curve in terms ...


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