Hot answers tagged

123

Two things I can think of up front: Are they expecting you to wipe their face off, or does it just come out of the blue? If they're not expecting it, it may surprise them, thus the entire process becomes a battle. Let them know beforehand. "Hey, that sandwich must've been yummy because you're super messy. I need to wipe off your face. Let me know when you ...


73

Summary Grapes are round and larger than a child's airway and may lead to occlusion. Food with a smooth, deformable surface can form a tight seal. Grapes are "the third most common cause of food-related fatal choking episodes". Children below 5 years of age don't chew as good yet. Grapes should be cut up for children. This is mostly about grapes, not ...


54

Advantages.... None Disadvantages... It creates unnecessary conflict with the child, and it compromises the child's natural ability to self-regulate food intake based on nutrition requirements. As long as children are offered healthy food (no junk food) they will naturally eat what they need and no more. Forcing them to finish their plate can potentially ...


52

This is what my mother did with us (it wouldn't work with very young children; I can't recall what she did then): We were never served food. It came to the table in whatever pot it was cooked in, and placed on a block of wood (to avoid burning the table). We then served ourselves out of that pot (or those pots, pans, whatever, depending on what the food was)...


44

There is an old Indian story: A lady and her son went to a monk asking about her son's sugar problem. The monk said, "Come back here in 10 days." After 10 days she went back to the monk with her son. Now the monk says to her son, "Kid, do not eat sugar. It is not good for your health." Surprised, the mother asked, "Why did you not say ...


37

Honey is not recommended at all for babies under one year of age because of the risk of infant botulism. The risk isn't big, but if it happens, it can be life-threatening. Avoiding honey until the child is older is an easy way to prevent this. To protect your baby from infant botulism: Don't offer honey. Wild honey is a potential source of C. botulinum ...


28

They hate it because it's slightly uncomfortable and not something they want to do. I made it a game. I have four boys who are now ages 16 to 11. When they were little and needed their faces washed (which happened quite often) I would make it a playful time. I would take the washcloth in one hand and hold the back of their head in the other. Then I ...


27

Botulism spores are one of the very few things that can survive in honey, and even then, they can only do it by becoming totally inactive. In an adult, stomach acid will destroy those spores, and normal gut microbes will eliminate any that survive to reach the small intestine An infant's stomach isn't acidic enough to do the job, and their intestinal ...


27

Edit: scientific content deleted as I am not able to find, in reasonable time, the exact references needed to support it. It will, in all likelihood, be unrealistic to really keep your toddlers away from sweets completely. That said: Eat less sweets yourself. You do not need to make a science of this, and you certainly do not need to count anything. You ...


25

It's quite easy to find information on this study. The gist of it is that if you force to your child to eat everything on their plate, they are more likely to become obese as an adult. That's messed up, so... please don't do this to your child. "New findings have shown that pushing children to eat everything on their plate has a direct link to obesity. ...


23

The good and bad news is that this is something that will almost surely pass on it's own with time. Your son is using throwing food on the floor as a way to initiate the "are you done?" interaction with you. This may be because he believes it's the right or best way to communicate this (it's been working for him so far) or because even though he ...


21

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


20

As a matter of fact, there is. Use a pair of scissors. If you take a large pair of scissors, you'll be able to cut it as fine as possible. And this method isn't limited to just bread, either.


19

Do not insist that your child eats a certain amount of solid food, or of anything else. The child will eat as much as they need. Keep offering your child solid food, but do not try to convince her to eat it. Have family meals. The child learns good eating habits from imitating the family members. Children learn by copying, and it helps if adults are eating ...


18

For those of us not in USA, "peep" is marshmallow candy: Wikipedia article. I had to look it up. As one user comments, infants can't chew food so they either spit it out, swallow it whole -- or choke on it! For this reason, infants should not be given food they can't swallow. If the parent feels that the infant really needs to eat a peep, then cut it up ...


16

I currently live in Japan. Needless to say, tea is extremely popular. Infants (9 months+) are sometimes given a certain type of tea called 麦茶, otherwise known as roasted barley tea. It is a caffeine free tea so it didn't make her jittery or keep her up and also has a few health benefits in the realm of bacterial resistance. This is the only tea we have given ...


15

What a child can do is not the same as what a parent should allow them to do or what a parent should force them to do. If one left whole-grain crackers and cereal on the counter and stocked the fridge with milk, cheese cubes, hummus, fruit, and cut-up veggies, a three-year-old could certainly feed herself whenever she was hungry and satisfy every ...


15

The American Academy of Pediatrics no longer recommends avoiding citrus fruit explicitly; see this resource for more detail as to what they do recommend. (Largely, any food.) The primary concerns now are honey (botulism) and nitrates in food (spinach, beets, green beans, squash, and carrots are specifically called out as potentially containing higher ...


13

Taken from this comment. It might work for some toddlers.


13

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


12

It is probably not good practice to let your 4-month-old eat a marshmallow for more than simply the fact that it's a choking hazard. A Peep is a marshmallow which means it's mostly sugar, but also gelatin, various dyes (depending on which color of Peep she gave her child), dairy products, and preservatives. My best friend's mother buys Peeps every year, ...


12

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices ...


12

We've got two working adults and three kids — we're very familiar with the scheduling challenges this causes. (Once your daughter starts having extracurricular activities, things will only get more hectic!) First off, if you want the whole family to be eating the same meal at the same time, a snack on the way home for your daughter is pretty critical to ...


11

Freeze it first... then cut it up. By the time you are done, it will probably be thawed out for eating!


11

The reason "for", generally, is grounded in a largely depression-era concern that you may not have enough nutrition/calories in the future. Literally, you need to eat it or you might starve. That was a concern in the 30s, and people raised then often took that to heart and kept it in the 50s and 60s when they were having kids. That said, there is an ...


11

The first issue is that kids that age don't think that far into the future. Something that happens several hours away isn't motivating for them. It needs to be more immediate. Otherwise, it feels to them like they were forced to do things they didn't want to all day, then to top it all off on a completely unrelated note, they don't get dessert either. ...


11

It's totally understandable that toddlers hate this, adults would too. Having your face wiped is potentially uncomfortable - cold, scratchy, wet. Their skin is sensitive too and it's easy for an adult to press uncomfortably hard when trying to remove a stubborn stain. And it's happening to them without their control. Do whatever you can to engage them as ...


11

Since your son is an adult, your ability to control him is pretty limited. It sounds like he knows it is an issue but is making the choice to ignore the advice of his dentists (has he really gone to multiple dentists all of whom have told him to stop drinking pop?). If you can't dissuade him from drinking soda maybe you can find out if there are anythings ...


10

Our nearly-two-years old (23,5 months) son has been "using" chopsticks for about three months. We had an Asian stir-fry for supper one night and he wanted to use the chop sticks just like Mama and Papa so we gave him a pair. He managed to eat most of his plate (the noodles were easy, the tofu was crumbly and difficult!). He mostly used just one stick and ...


10

Depends on what you consider a meal. Peanut-butter and Jelly sandwiches? 5 or 6, I expect. Something hot or that requires a knife? You'd have to spend time cooking with them to know when it would be ok. My kids could make batter from scratch and cook pancakes on an electric griddle by themselves at eight, but I wouldn't let them do it without an adult ...


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