55

I'm not speaking from either personal experience (my children were all spaced farther apart) or from academic research in this answer. That being said: I think that "hiding" the breastfeeding will eventually end up making the toddler feel more isolated and excluded by her younger sibling. It will require specifically removing one sibling from another's ...


32

You can understand why babies and toddlers may do that - your body is the source of their comfort and happiness. It is normal for them to do it, although a more common comfort is sucking the thumb, for example. As far as what age you may expect them to do it, this is entirely dependent on culture. Some cultures accept breastfeeding to quite an advanced age, ...


26

My wife stopped breastfeeding when our daughter was 3. She did it by repeating often the whole month before she turned 3 that when she will be 3, she will be older, and that she will stop breastfeeding. Bigger childs don't drink breast milk, that's part of the growing-up process, at by the time our daughter was 3, she perfectly understood that. Actually, for ...


25

According to the study titled The possible role of human milk nucleotides as sleep inducers published in Nutritional Neuroscience, a link was found between certain levels of nucleotides contained in breast milk over a 24 hour period. The conclusions portion stated the following: Conclusions The assay of nucleotides in the breast-milk of the study population ...


21

is [a 2.5yr old breatfeeding] normal? This is largely a cultural question, and without information about your community is unanswerable. However it may be helpful to understand whether it's safe or recommended, and why one might choose to continue or discontinue breastfeeding at a specific age. First, there is no safety issue. While it is recommended to ...


16

No, nothing is too late. I sense some very important things in your favour: Your milk supply matches her needs. Two weeks is pretty early, even in "standard" cases BF is still not that established at that age. You seem determined to make this work and willing to ask for help -an excellent attitude. Without more details, it's hard to give precise advice, ...


14

Not to necro post, but I did find a study which seems to directly answer this question: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8889628 Short answer is that they found no significant impact on nutritional value as long as the final temperature of the milk stayed below 60 C (140F). Considering our target temp is 37C (98.6F) it should be no problem if you are ...


14

Firstly, your doctor is the authoritative voice here. The doctor says your toddler is okay, so I would listen to them before asking strangers on the internet. If you do want some reassurance though, yes, children all have different times they stop breast feeding. Some wean themselves early, others would keep going forever. Your baby is already happy with ...


13

So this doesn't seem too unusual to me. Many babies prefer to be held, and some more than others. A few suggestions: Have you tried swaddling? The feeling of being wrapped mimics the feeling in the womb, and my babies would not sleep without being swaddled. have you tried a swing? Some babies really like the gentle rocking motion (again, this mimics the ...


12

An important thing which most analyses of breastfeeding studies that I have read note is that women who breastfeed tend to have higher IQs and incomes than women who don't, at least in first world countries. Because of the changes in lifestyle factors which result, it is nearly impossible to sort out what impacts on women and children are from breastfeeding ...


12

What a great question! Congratulations on your first baby and your decision to try breastfeeding. It's much harder than you think, but don't give up because it is very rewarding. Anyway, some ways your husband can help are: Before feeding, dad can change the baby and get her undressed. It'll give him some skin time, and some face time. My kids used to ...


11

It is very likely that daycare will allow you to bring refrigerated or frozen breast milk and that your partner will be able to pump at work, but it takes dedication and logistics. I will share my experience, as it worked for us and was improved over months of trial/error. I went back to work when my baby was 3 months old. Each day, (after nursing my ...


11

I've never seen an establishment prevent parents from giving bottled (as in baby bottle) milk to their kids, whether that is breast milk or formula. Very few places (none?) will be prepared to correctly prepare a baby bottle to force you to buy it directly from them. Think of all the issues involved in that. I would be extremely surprised if they gave you ...


10

I feel stuck as I can't see a solution that fits my desired parenting style whilst maintaining my sanity, not being too upset with my son and getting enough sleep to function at work. You are stuck, because you have conflicting desires/goals here. Prioritizing is painful when you want so much for your baby, yet it results in a significant cost to you. But ...


10

My wife did a ton of searching around for answers on this. The general rule of thumb that she found was that breast milk concentration goes as blood-alcohol concentration does. We fully metabolize about an ounce of alcohol in 3 hours or so. The best advice I've seen is to pump directly before drinking so you can store the un-contaminated breast milk. This ...


10

It's not feasible to try to prevent the child from seeing the new baby nursing. It probably will be hard for her, as will lots of things now, but she will learn to adjust. You'll both just need to be extra mindful to give the other children lots of hugs, and lots of attention, whenever you can.


9

There are actual clinical studies that prove Gliadin, the protein from gluten, does pass through breastmilk (also here). My baby has gluten intolerance and me being gluten free has kept her symptoms away. Her pediatrician thinks she may have celiac disease. She had terrible stomach cramps and also severe diarrhea (10 times a day). We tested it multiple times ...


9

You are probably fighting against his natural social development by expecting him to go back to the breast after having grown beyond it. Natural weaning can start as early as 6 months (when solids are introduced) and often occurs by age one (with increases in appetite and activity). Your son has developed his first level of independence with some control ...


9

If you're talking about what is officially termed "kangaroo care", for premature and special-needs babies, then you'd need to follow your doctors' recommendations for their care. Kangaroo care may be recommended for up to several hours at a time, but it would depend on how medically stable the baby was. On the other hand, if you are talking about a more ...


9

You may end up getting a long list of answers, which isn't ideal on Stack Exchange, but my wife did the following: watch TV read books listen to music but also, kept going with our normal active life with pauses to feed: hiking, then feeding on hilltops to appreciate the view boating, on both punts and yachts She found using a sling made this very easy. ...


9

At 7 months, the various responses are unlikely to have that much affect, so while your wife could try removal from the breast / firm no / etc the problem will have probably fixed itself before they work. The key is to pay attention to the change in latch which usually signifies baby is going to bite (babies can't bite while latched properly - the tongue ...


9

Well, NHS Choices says: Don't use a microwave to heat up or defrost breast milk as it can cause hot spots, which can burn your baby's mouth. The American Academy of Paediatrics says: Do not use microwave ovens to heat bottles, because they do not heat them evenly. Uneven heating can scald your baby or damage the milk. Bottles can also explode if left ...


9

Breast milk is, essentially, water with a bunch of other nutritious stuff in it. Water intoxication can be a concern if an infant drinks too much plain water in addition to breast milk or formula, but that requires a significant volume of water: Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid healthy babies need. If a mother feels her baby needs to take ...


8

Whether you should wake a sleeping newborn for feedings depends on the baby's age, weight and overall health. Most newborns lose weight in the first few days after birth. Until your newborn regains this lost weight — usually within one to two weeks after birth — it's important to feed him or her frequently. This might mean occasionally waking your baby for ...


8

Babies usually stop feeding by themselves when they are full. My child would turn her head away from me when she was full, you dont have to take it out from her mouth. Is it because she is sucking for a very long time that is causing you to worry? Some babies opt for long feeds, while others finish quickly. My cousins child would feed for as long as 30 mins ...


8

Getting a good latch is indeed very important, and if you suspect your baby is not latching properly now is a very good time to work on it, before it becomes a hard-to-break-habit for your child to latch in a suboptimal way. First, the size of the areola, "the brown part of the breast", varies between women. Some women have very small areolas, others have ...


8

In rare cases, if mom has certain types of inffectious diseases, this can be a problem because they can spread - but for most people not at all. In fact, it is completely normal for blood to be in the milk (especially with first-time moms) anyway (even with healthy nipples). You just don't always see it because it is in such small amounts. It can make ...


8

To some extent milk is milk, but the nutritional content shifts gradually over time to meet the growth patterns of a baby (and also again around weaning). At about a month, your milk generally has more fat and less protein than breastmilk from Day 3. Feeding him that milk isn't unsafe* or unhealthy, but perhaps consider mixing half Day 3 milk and half "now"...


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