184

DCook's answer is heading in the right direction, but it's at it from the wrong end. Don't ask your daughter if she did something wrong, not because she might lie to you, or she might not lie to you, or whether or not you know the answer. That's all coming from a faulty paradigm: that it's expected for your daughter to tell you the truth when you ask her ...


171

I am a retired teacher and I am shocked that this teacher felt that was appropriate. I'd start by talking to the teacher -- but you hang on to the papers. IMO, and probably the vast majority of parents and teachers, we are trying to build up children and encourage them into enjoying the learning process. We are not there to tear them down. If the teacher ...


170

So... I've raced bikes and from my experience, they are probably littering. As much as a race organizer may try to clean up after a race the distance covered and volume of waste generated during a race means trash is spread along hundreds of miles and clean up is not going to be 100% effective. Those racers are probably also practicing sanctioned littering....


147

This teacher is carefully producing a future math-hater. I've worked with enough high school students to know. I've also worked with enough people in personal counseling to know that whether you care to face it or not, this sort of work is NOT accidental. This is a deliberate, even if unconscious, effort to sabotage your child's learning. At that age the ...


138

Try to go along this line: There are rules that exist for everyone. I have to go to work. You have to go to school. I tell you about the rules because I know them; I don't just make them up to bother you. Sometime, I will simplify a rule or regroup a few "grownup rules" for you. Because there are other, more complicated, rules that I can't directly ...


129

I don't think you can "parent" in the sense of applying discipline and strong guidance. But you can be in his life. My mother had a god-daughter on a different continent. From the time the god-daughter was a young child, my mother would write to her regularly. She always remembered birthdays and Christmas. She probably only visited a few times as the girl ...


109

My daughter, a few years older than yours, is also a skillful liar when she chooses to be. My best advice is "trust but verify." Children are good at knowing what works, and if lying is a reliable, consequence free way of getting what she wants, there's no reason --from her point of view --not to deploy it. (In contrast, my son rarely lies, probably not ...


106

Kids that age learn a lot by imaginative play. It's how they make sense of the world and experiment with different responses to events. Pretending to be an adult is very common. Playing along is a good opportunity to show empathy and teach better responses. You might say, I'm Eric. I'm sad because I couldn't find my toy. I wonder if I should cry or ask ...


105

In my experience, he often doesn't know himself what he means. I've heard a lot of four-year-olds ask "Why?" ad infinitum -- sometimes it's just a way of saying, "Tell me more." I would suspect that for most four-year-olds, asking "Why?" is a way of trying to learn more about the things around them, but I think that they are often looking for a simple ...


105

I find great importance in fostering a child's sense of personal control. Her nos are no and her yesses are yes - unless there is potential for physical or psychological harm. I'd suggest taking your daughter's lead regarding what she wants to watch. Offer shows to watch together and if she says yes, then watch it. If no, don't force the issue. When ...


100

From everything that I can find online, it is a positive thing to show affection in front of your kids. It models affection to your children, and it makes them feel more secure https://www.whattoexpect.com/news/first-year/how-much-pda-okay-front-baby-kids/ My own experience agrees with what I have read. I don't think I ever even saw my father and mother ...


83

By tolerating the behavior, you're validating the behavior. Her age doesn't matter - it only make the problem your responsibility. Let's call things as they are: your daughter bullied another girl to the point that she doesn't want to come to school anymore. Work with the teachers on a solution. And inform the girl's parents. At the very least, have your ...


70

I do not like my behavior. Parenting is difficult at every stage for somewhat different reasons. Children aren't miniature adults, especially at your child's age. They don't think or process like adults; they don't have a long period of time to learn 'the consequences' of simple behaviors like adults. Even some adults haven't learned yet to accept the ...


68

I think your instincts of jealousy are spot-on. My daughter did this starting when her little brother arrived home from the hospital, and every time she felt like he was getting more of Mama's attention, out came the verbal knives. Our fix was to schedule special one-on-one time with her when we could. And when things were just too crazy to carve very ...


62

Yes. Five years old is way too old for a stroller. I personally think a five-year-old should be completely stroller free, not just almost. Humans are animals, just like all other animals that roam the Earth and we were given two legs to use. As such, not using them for their intended purpose leads to atrophy, decay, and laziness. Walking is exercise thus ...


61

First of all, recognize that your concerns may not be the same as your four year old's concerns. This has two implications: Your child may be worried about things you couldn't have thought of. Your child is likely shielded from or doesn't understand a lot of what's going on, and that can also mean that they don't have access to bits of information that ...


57

I can't find any research on this typical but stepped-up-a-level game of peek-a-boo. I think you have to go with your gut on this one. If any child seems to overly react, then likely you are overdoing it. If you are actually trying to scare a child, we'd have to ask why, but this doesn't seem to be the case or you would not be asking. I suggest taking ...


57

Seems to me this is something where the truth is a good answer. You are responsible for her, because of her lack of experience and lack of maturity. The more she can show maturity, the less you need to boss her around. If she can get ready herself without you telling her to - so much the better for both of you!


55

I agree with the other answers. This was not an appropriate way to correct the child's homework. From just this example, I would guess that the teacher was more interested in obedience than initiative, which is definitely not good. (He was asked to write from one to 30. He wrote from 2 to 50. Personally, I would have been pleased as punch, and said so.) I ...


55

First, please know that I agree 100% with @David Hedlund's answer in its entirety. I just want to address one particular point that needs to be stressed. His teacher says if this type of behavior continues, his language base will be weak and create problems for him in upcoming years. Language skills aren't weak because a preschooler can't/won't write ...


55

The approach we use, with our children, is to focus on understanding the reasons for belief, and the benefits of believing in something even if it's not real. Our oldest never really believed, and I didn't want to push a belief with falsehoods; by 4 he'd figured things out, particularly at his Montessori preschool with older children having intelligent ...


53

At the risk of being unpopular, I would say: do nothing. She is doing everything right. Learning itself is a difficult skill to learn. In this case, we can apply the model of "zone of proximal development". You have already correctly realized that people do not learn much when in their comfort zone, and need to spend some time out of it, where things are ...


52

First, I would ask him about why he doesn't like writing his name. Is it boring? Is it too hard? Is it too repetitive? Etc. Once you know why he doesn't like it, you can work on helping him, either by working with the teacher/school to make adjustments or by helping him practice or otherwise addressing the issue. If I were to hazard a guess, it sounds ...


51

Although it is always wise to be cautious about the safety of your young child, in general it is developmentally normal and natural (and not at all sexual in the adult sense) for a three year old to touch or play with his private parts. It's generally a matter of curiosity, and perhaps increased access if he is recently out of diapers. Adult strong reactions ...


50

You probably need to get started on English exposure soon. At some point he wants to play with other kids and unless you live in a French speaking enclave, that will happen in English. I suggest moving either daycare, or cartoons, or some TV/audio-books to English. I wouldn't worry too much about overloading your child: young kids have a remarkable ability ...


49

Here's a great way that has nothing to do with money but instead something tangible that's easier for young minds to grasp. Plants! What you want to do is get your hands on some heritage-grade seeds - the sort that will grow plants that then make their own seeds that will produce more plants. Some sort of beans might be a good choice, but look into various ...


49

Six years old is old enough to understand gender in a general sense, and it’s definitely old enough to have an intelligent conversation about the complexities of gender. So my answer is to be honest with them and tell them how you feel. If you know, then tell them. If you’re not sure, then say so- and explain why, and what is going on in your head. Say ...


47

Rest assured that science and religion are not neccessarily a contradiction. Some of the best scientists of past and present time were deeply religious - and came from different religious backgrounds. As one commenter wrote, Georges Lemaître being one relatively modern example. The question of how to connect religious beliefs and teachings and scientific ...


47

I tend to think some version of the truth is always best. To deal with this question when my son asked it, I used a fruit analogy: just like apples grow on trees, babies grow in their mommy's tummies; and just like there was no apple before it started growing, there was no baby before it started growing. I'd maybe skip the bit about exactly what triggers a ...


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