Hot answers tagged

70

At six months old, the key is to talk a lot, and to give the baby lots of opportunities to explore their environment. One approach that worked well for us was to follow the Montessori approach to organizing our house and what our children played with. One example for that approach is on this site, which gives a good overview of the concepts. Key things to ...


41

Turn off the TV and interact with your child If your IQs are so high, use that intelligence. You can't make a child more clever. That's built in, by nature. What you want are skills they can develop through nurture. You can help a child to build language skills by constantly interacting with them, talking to them, singing to them, reading to them. The more ...


41

Too many stimuli can be harmful to a baby. Here's a few articles 1, 2 - or just google overstimulation and check for yourself. In general it is not recommended for children below 18 months to have any exposure to "screens" of any kind, be it smartphone or TV or console 3, 4. Google "screen time for children". Worrying about IQ at the age ...


22

First off, to alleviate your fears - while the backside of a fridge is not usually meant to be touched, there should not be any serious danger from touching it. There are not hot elements to burn you, and no exposed wires with dangerous voltages - if the fridge follows the safety regulations. There are, however, possibly some sharp metal parts and it's ...


22

Do not show videos to infants. The current consensus in the scientific community is that for small children, the effects of screen time are overwhelmingly negative. There are few, if any, positive effects. REFERENCES: For children younger than 18 months, avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting. American Academy of Pediatrics Announces New ...


16

Just to add some context to the reasons why screen time is bad for babies, and to reasurre you that this isn't some "old people think technology is bad"... Developmentally, under 18 months babies don't equate what's on the screen to real life equivalents. That means they can't learn effectively from screens; they need physical stimuli and social ...


15

Above all else, let her play. In my opinion there is way too much focus on academics in the early years these days, and not enough on creativity and play which are integral to how a child learns about the world around it. Let her play, be creative, use her imagination. These things will serve her phenomenally well later in life (problem solving, deductive ...


12

Including your children in your life and activities builds both intelligence and capacity. Especially for young children, avoid passive activities like videos, or non-human interactions such as computer games --resist the temptation to let YouTube raise them for you. Instead, have real conversations with your children. Talk to them and listen. Do creative ...


11

Tips to develop intelligence in infants: Create a safe environment for the child at home, where they feel secure and loved, and have an opportunity to explore the world without excessive stress. Avoid screen time. For details, see: Should I show my six month old educational videos? Talk to the child. A lot. Use "parentese" (the exaggerated ...


10

"Months" of age is an approximate concept at best, so its going to depend on the context. SE.Law has a discussion of the relevant bit of English law for contracts that specify a term of months, which is that: if the period expired on a date that did not exist in a particular month (eg 31st February), then the period would expire on the last day of ...


10

Pool noodles are a great idea, though my favored go-to here is pipe insulation. You can find it in black and rubberized, which tends to blend into the background really well. I wouldn't worry about the kid dislodging it if you get the right size - make it a tight fit. Don't worry about ventilation, just don't run it up very far. I also put it underneath the ...


9

What can I do to a 6 month child so she end up smart and have high IQ? Your child's IQ is what it is. (The constant drive of IQ test developers is to take the child's socio-economic and educational background out of the picture.) The only thing that can change it is damage (via trauma or exposure to certain chemicals). Thus, nothing that any of the other ...


9

Don't worry. First, there is nothing dangerous on the backside of a modern (1980 or newer) fridge, except for a great deal of dust and probably spider webs. The kid will probably find enough dust elsewhere. Wires are isolated, tubes get hot to touch but not hot enough to cause real damage. Second, nothing bad will actually happen if you push the fridge to ...


8

Pool Noodles. They can be trimmed to fix any gap that is smaller than them. They are not permanent (in case you are renting). With one put in the gap, if he reaches back there, all that will happen is that the pool noodle will be pushed back, then as an advantage, you will also know if he tried to explore while you back was turned.


5

Several of the other answers touch near this, but I didn't see anyone directly state it. One of the most beneficial things you can do to help your child's development is to read to/with your child. Reading with your child is one of the most effective ways to build the "language" neural connections. Reading aloud to kids has clear cognitive ...


5

One of the most important things you can do for your child as they reach the age where they can begin eating solid foods is to make sure you are watching their early-childhood nutrition. Make sure your child stays on a healthy growth curve and is getting plenty of essential nutrients from a variety of sources. Micronutrients that have shown to be critical ...


3

There are many kinds of smart. IQ, logic and math aptitude are not everything. Familiarize yourself with the many areas your child will need to improve in over the years and make sure to include them all in your child's upbringing and education. Interpersonal skills, empathy, physical education, coordination, morals. Also, one does not need a high IQ in ...


3

You will probably be interested in the book "Kindergarten is too late" (幼稚園では遅すぎる) by Masaru Ibuka. To quote a review of the book: Masaru Ibuka makes astonishing (and interesting) suggestions for the early development of the child. Since a small child would rather learn than eat, why not let him learn foreign languages at the same time as his ...


2

You write that both you and your wife are highly intelligent. So I would like to ask: What did your parents and the parents of your wife do that you both became so intelligent? Do you remember some things? Or would you say that you had a normal childhood, just like other children? I guess that they did not do anything special. And they both were successful ...


2

Yes, as a general rule they gain nothing from screen time at this age. It represents only 'opportunity cost'. That is, they lose out from the things they could have been doing instead. They can't understand what they're seeing and hearing, so they have no way to contextualise it and save it into their brains as useful knowledge. Some people are arguing that ...


1

Slightly different answer that might be useful for future readers. We had some success baby-proofing with perspex sheets and velcro patches. My toddler was forever emptying the lower shelves in our bookcase. My husband bought some large, rigid, clear perspex sheets (maybe 1m by 0.6m? big enough to cover the bottom two shelves of our bookcases). He fitted ...


1

The key is amount of time you spend with your kid. Amount of time you spend with your kid matters. In comparision, there is nothing like quality time. It is about amount of time. Regarding how for the required goal, we need to remember, "Where there is a will there is a way" as it is situation specific.


1

An aspect which people didn't mention yet is that how you talk to your child is important. An infant is a paradox: It is at the same time simple and of infinite depth. Children need chit-chat and play and fun but they need serious communication as well. The principal attitude I want to stress is: Take your child serious as a person. Listen to what they have ...


1

we want him to be high IQ as well IQ is mostly nature and only partly nurture. There is a known case of a young boy (I'll try to find it online) who was intensively taught chess at an early age because his parents wanted him to become a young grand master. He became a very good player but never progressed beyond a certain level. He simply didn't have the ...


1

If you think IQ is a good measure of intelligence, you don't understand intelligence. You can't make a child smart. What you can do, however, is teach the importance of critical thinking skills and scientific literacy. You need to try and find a way to spark some intellectual curiosity and then foster that whichever way the child chooses to take it. A few ...


1

At this age children can pick up languages quite easily, so this is something you want to exploit. You can e.g. hire tutors for a few languages, like Chinese, ancient Greek, Latin etc. You should let your child play a lot, you can choose games that require some intellectual effort like counting without that being a formal arithmetic lesson. Start with formal ...


1

Picking up on your last point, perhaps illustrating your goal: I thought it's a good thing to teach him how to count from young you won't teach a child that at such a young age whatever you do. That's not to say you can't get off to an early start - you need to communicate with your baby for a good start to their intellectual development, talking, singing ...


1

Do some research into the developmental stages of childhood. There are lots of studies out there. I would think that in a typical household it would be virtually impossible for a baby/child to have zero exposure to screens. Parents and siblings regularly have televisions, computers, tablets and phones in front of them and even if a baby isn't actually ...


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