Hot answers tagged

163

Ok. I'm going to take a shot at this. I semi-agree with Erica's comment that this could be seen as primarily opinion based but at the same time, it's not and there are methods out there that we parents can share with each other in order to better enable ourselves to handle times like these. The first thing that you need to understand is that this is ...


114

You already have received a fine answer to which I want to add a bit. Kids that age pretty much wear their feelings on their sleeves, and while fake crying as manipulation isn't rare, the whole thing looked quite genuine to me. Genuine sadness is not a punishable offense; it is always an appropriate option (and one I would choose) to console the child in ...


107

Maybe unpopular opinion: Tricking children, especially ones who are too young to understand and appreciate it as a joke, is at best unkind, and can be outright mean, regardless of intentions. For children who can understand it as a joke, it can still come across as condescending. Think about how you would feel, even as an adult, if a vendor did that to you ...


73

Summary Grapes are round and larger than a child's airway and may lead to occlusion. Food with a smooth, deformable surface can form a tight seal. Grapes are "the third most common cause of food-related fatal choking episodes". Children below 5 years of age don't chew as good yet. Grapes should be cut up for children. This is mostly about grapes, not ...


71

At six months old, the key is to talk a lot, and to give the baby lots of opportunities to explore their environment. One approach that worked well for us was to follow the Montessori approach to organizing our house and what our children played with. One example for that approach is on this site, which gives a good overview of the concepts. Key things to ...


70

Find help. If you're not getting enough sleep and you start crying over dirty clothes, you are exhausted and breaking down. I don't think this is normal behavior (just my opinion, but we had a baby who cried for 7 months straight, never slept for more than 2 hours and threw up often, so I can relate a bit - it drove us nuts, but we didn't end up crying over ...


54

You are in a tough situation. Having to share parenting with someone you hate is very difficult. And whenever anyone upsets your child, it's natural to want to prevent that. Let me make some suggestions for you. first, no hitting - I am presuming that "pop our son top make him hush" means hitting. That has to stop. It doesn't work, it makes the crying ...


52

There's a level of disagreement about whether children should be allowed in "adult settings," and you can get all sorts of opinions on what's appropriate (both for the sake of the child, and for the sake of other patrons). Is this something people do? Yes. It's pretty unusual, but clearly not unknown or impossible. I did take an infant to a microbrewery ...


52

I have a practical piece of advice: wear your baby in a sling/wrap. My 10 month old has been worn by either me or dad ever since she was born, and we cannot begin to imagine how much harder our lives would have been if we had not done so! We use both a wrap (for longer walks, for example) and a sling (easier to put on, but mainly used in the house; it is ...


48

According to NICHD: No. Myth: Babies who sleep on their backs will choke if they spit up or vomit during sleep. Fact: Babies automatically cough up or swallow fluid that they spit up or vomit—it’s a reflex to keep the airway clear. Studies show no increase in the number of deaths from choking among babies who sleep on their backs. In fact, ...


47

Babies are not good at figuring out what is bothering them -- simply that something is. Being tired, in particular, leads to a general crankiness that is difficult to alleviate. Since your son doesn't really understand that simply falling asleep will help him feel better if he's tired, he starts "complaining" in general. I am unhappy. It must be the way I'...


46

This is the result of a normal developmental stage, perhaps made more noticeable in your case by having a baby who started rolling earlier than average, and your baby isn't likely to get severely hurt by just leaving her to it. On the other hand, I have seen babies get a bruise on their forehead from doing this, and I personally couldn't really bear to see ...


45

is this approach going to help her build connection with a basic vocabulary Yes should I try to broaden it as much as I can and as soon as I can? Yes. Progress the Russian and English vocabulary at the same pace and at whatever pace feels "natural". First of all, it's great that you are trying raise a bilingual child. This will be a great ...


45

Our oldest was two when we had our second child. Anecdotal I know, but the way it played out for us, I think that was a perfect timing to get a sibling. Before too long, they won't remember the time before they had a sibling, which is something you can't say for older children: they'll long recall that there used to be a time when they had 100% parental ...


44

This weird stage is really common, and mostly developmental-- something that most babies will naturally outgrow. It's upsetting and gross, but not harmful. The baby won't actually choke or cause injury by occasionally over inserting fingers in the mouth. My son did it for a couple weeks at about that age, and it's recently had a brief resurgence (age 2)....


42

Too many stimuli can be harmful to a baby. Here's a few articles 1, 2 - or just google overstimulation and check for yourself. In general it is not recommended for children below 18 months to have any exposure to "screens" of any kind, be it smartphone or TV or console 3, 4. Google "screen time for children". Worrying about IQ at the age ...


41

I see no reason to think this inappropriate behavior. Did you see any harm being done to the infant? There was no smoking in its presence. The baby was safely tucked into its bjorn carrier (already a positive parent sign), not being passed among the crowd, or mouthing everything in sight. She was having some drinks which she may have sorely missed while ...


41

Turn off the TV and interact with your child If your IQs are so high, use that intelligence. You can't make a child more clever. That's built in, by nature. What you want are skills they can develop through nurture. You can help a child to build language skills by constantly interacting with them, talking to them, singing to them, reading to them. The more ...


37

Honey is not recommended at all for babies under one year of age because of the risk of infant botulism. The risk isn't big, but if it happens, it can be life-threatening. Avoiding honey until the child is older is an easy way to prevent this. To protect your baby from infant botulism: Don't offer honey. Wild honey is a potential source of C. botulinum ...


32

Is sitting a mandatory part of development? Yes, it is. And your child has passed it. You put it quite well: Sitting apparently does nothing for him. It's not that he can't do it, it's that he prefers either to be more active or what is further away. That he can pull himself up and stand means his balance and core strength are just fine (see under ...


28

This is something I needed to deal with. If they are starting to ask why they can't babysit, I would say something like this: As you know, we disagree on a few things that would be relevant while you were babysitting, like what kinds of food are ok or how quickly a crying baby needs to be picked up. I know that you think these differences are no big deal, ...


28

Sorry to be pragmatic, but: Get your 3 year old daughter in full time daycare If money isn't an issue, spend the $1k/month to get her in a place to socialize with others. She needs to talk, that's good. Find one that is good enough, and drop her off. After a week or so, she will absolutely love it. She will have peers to play with, and a teacher who is an ...


27

Botulism spores are one of the very few things that can survive in honey, and even then, they can only do it by becoming totally inactive. In an adult, stomach acid will destroy those spores, and normal gut microbes will eliminate any that survive to reach the small intestine An infant's stomach isn't acidic enough to do the job, and their intestinal ...


27

I think CF13's answer is spot on. I just want to add a little bit of information to support/expand on it. I assume by "choke", you mean a significant event, like death or aspiration pneumonia, not merely coughing or gagging. The latter are actually ways to clear the throat (kind of the opposite of choking.) Without going into too much detail, there are ...


27

I don't really agree with Ferber, but I think there are parts of the approach that can be adapted without as much of the "make your baby cry, and usually the parent also" portion. It's probably impossible to do it with zero crying, but that's mostly because you're ultimately trying to do something the baby doesn't like - so of course there will be ...


26

I don't think there is much that needs to change here, you can't judge the way a child is raised by some isolated incident that happens to be caught on tape. Getting the icecream for the child at this shop is likely a treat / special occasion, intended purely to make the child happy. In that situation, with a child of that age, it's not a good time for ...


26

In our experience, the main reading-promoting activities at this early age were limited to reading aloud to children. We used good quality books with lots of pictures, often board books. Having the parent engaged in reading is important, so we always had a good supply of children's books that were also interesting to adults. At its best, reading to children ...


25

My 5 month old does this. This is perfectly normal for a new-born. When he was around 2 months old this happened a lot but as he has got older it doesn't seem happen so much unless it's new. Remember for the first 6 months their eyesight is still developing and everything is brand new. I would just make sure that they aren't staring at the sun. I've had a ...


23

First things first: No, not all mothers are as protective as your wife is and from what you write, her behaviour is far from normal. (But of course we have only your statement to go by.) From what your comment suggests, you have no support from your inlaws, but it seems you need professional help. More than even a benevolent family or stangers on the ...


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