16

No, nothing is too late. I sense some very important things in your favour: Your milk supply matches her needs. Two weeks is pretty early, even in "standard" cases BF is still not that established at that age. You seem determined to make this work and willing to ask for help -an excellent attitude. Without more details, it's hard to give precise advice, ...


14

You and your wife can absolutely handle a baby without Grandparents help, many people have in the past and will in the future. The real question is: Do you want to? Having a baby and caring for a baby is extremely taxing--both physically and mentally. If your wife plans on breastfeeding, she will be feeding every 2-3 hours. If the baby doesn't sleep well,...


14

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


11

Sure, there are many great ideas. Playing at this age is about teaching, bonding -- encouraging your child. Peek-a-boo -- This and all its derivatives are great. They build language and trust. Hide your eyes and pretend you can't see him. Show him how to cover his eyes and pretend you can't see him or that you can see him. It's fun. Hide behind a blanket or ...


11

At that age it is probably at least partly an impulse control issue-- Even adults, when excited by the conversation, can suddenly tend to interrupt when they think of something they really want to say. Limited impulse control is totally normal at three, so this is probably something you will need to work with her on over time. Some possible ways to improve ...


9

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


8

If you set things up the right way, mom only resting, holding baby and feeding for the first few days is feasible, and may even be ideal for establishing a good milk supply if she wants to exclusively breastfeed. The first week or so, a breastfed newborn's basic needs are as follows: Clean diaper and clothing Nursing on demand (which is usually very, very ...


8

First and foremost, make sure your child's hearing is tested. If there's a problem, deal with that. Your baby/14 month old sounds like a normal, active 14 month old. She wants what she wants. She can't delay gratification (like you can) and be still while being taught. She can't control most of her impulses, and exploring (every part of the room) is one of ...


6

Legally, no medical procedures can be done to minors without parental consent (with exceptions in some states for contraceptive care for teenagers). In practice, doctors who claim emergency medical necessity can basically do what they think is necessary. For more legal advice than that general information, you should ask a lawyer. I recommend you air these ...


6

Everyone is afraid of having children. The difference is in the reason why. Are you afraid having children will ruin your lifestyle by consuming all your time, forcing you to give up your hobbies and prevent you from partying every weekend? Then you aren't ready to have a child yet. those fears are justified, by the way Are you afraid you might make ...


5

You're asking a really hard question; I'm not sure anyone can answer it for you. If everyone knew ahead of time how difficult raising a child was (as you have a fairly good inkling of), many people might never work up the courage to have children. For some, that might be the right path; for others, the joys far outweigh the difficulties. If your major ...


5

This is not specific to having children, but more general to all choices that will be life-changing and irreversible: If you're not sure if you're ready, you're not ready. Of course, this advice does not really help in how to go from "not sure" to "ready", but I've found with kids that this is in part also a factor of time. But I've noticed with the topic ...


4

My first baby was 4 weeks early. He had a hard time latching, since his mouth was so tiny. He was also VERY small and skinny, and we were only allowed 15 min of breastfeeding as it wore him out. He had a much easier time with a nipple shield for the first few weeks. It was recommended by a nurse, though my nipples are not flat. I would say go ahead and ...


4

It doesn't so much matter what we think, it matters what your wife thinks, and it sounds like she'll be happiest and most comfortable giving birth and learning to care for an infant with her mother's help. When you become a parent you learn you have to sacrifice a lot of your own wants in favor of the best interests of your child and his/her mother, and ...


4

In my experience so far, "Toddlerishness" waxes and wanes in the first few years. Right now she is clingy and combative during changes, next month (or week, or... hour, honestly) she may co-operate during changes but refuse to take baths. She may becomes more independent and stop hanging on your legs, but become so brave she dashes away randomly when you'...


3

In addition to all the other great ideas I'd add roughhousing. The Art of Manliness explains why it's so important: http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/02/07/the-importance-of-roughhousing-with-your-kids/


3

I'll add a few things to Willow's answer. Stuffed animal games. These would include counting, sorting (all the kitties, all the bunnies, etc.), and taking turns picking one at a time as a "team." Use the kiddie carts at the grocery store. Make car noises. Stickers. Especially scratch and sniff or bubble stickers. Shopping mall play areas. Toddlers tend to ...


3

I know this is cheesy, but I believe it sums it up pretty well. From the movie "The Princess Diaries": Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgement that something is more important than fear; The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all. This is not a way of advocating that you need to have courage and jump in ...


3

As naomisl said, legally they can't do anything without your consent, and they have a lot of checks and balances to make sure the right baby gets matched with the right parents. However, a lot of that consent also comes by way of the forms you sign when you are first admitted, in addition to sort of rushed "okays" you give when they ask a question like, "We'...


3

Continue to offer the nipple! It took a couple weeks for my baby to latch, so in the beginning I was exclusively pumping. The cradle and the cross cradle hold I learned in the hospital from the lactation consultant just wasn't working for us. It actually wasn't until I came across this article on "natural breast feeding" that I had some success. During ...


2

Can you both handle this without help from you parents? Absolutely. From the point of view of making life easier for your wife or yourself, using the help of the parents is just perfectly fine. From the point of view of forming a family, it's bad. The family that you and your wife should be worried about are you, your wife, and the baby. Instead the ...


2

It depends on where you are planning to go and how many people you will come into contact with. Our pediatrician wanted us to wait three weeks with our daughter (full-term) and two months with our son (preemie & in NICU for a few weeks), to allow their immune systems to develop sufficiently to be able to handle most of the germs they'll come into ...


2

The Nightlight, while not directly affiliated with The Wirecutter, aims to be a similar kind of "we tested everything in this category, and if you want one of these, this is the one you want" kind of definitive resource for baby products. What I've read there seems to indicate they've got the right idea, but the site is young and doesn't cover heaps of ...


2

White noise machines are great, but in my experience the ROUTINE is what will make the difference. You say he goes to bed at different times every night; that makes a routine very hard for him to get into, and if he cannot reliably predict what will happen (bath at 7, book at 7:30, lights out at 8) it makes it more difficult for him to settle down. Can all ...


2

We found a cradle swing extremely useful with both of ours, when they were overtired and really needed to sleep but couldn't get off to sleep. White noise + swinging motion + dim moving lights + mobile + mum or dad nearby = baby hypnotism machine.


2

I really have no idea what to expect, so what she is expecting feasible or is it going to be impossible? In the short run, yes, it's feasible. You can take care of the baby's needs (except, obviously, for breastfeeding). So if you can take a few days/a week or two off work, you can do most of the baby care (changing diapers, carrying the baby, rocking him/...


2

My feeling is this is too much to ask of a 3 year old. I think you should not focus on how to discipline / train the child and instead, use the year of age 3 to relearn how to deal with her antics without losing your temper. This age, 2.5 to 3.5 is when my child learned how to infuriate me, and the only way I could get above it was to prepare. Make sure I ...


2

Now I warned our daughter that she will need to go to her room if she breaks other people's conversation again until she's ready to come back and not do it again. @Meg gave a great answer. I'd like only to expand on the idea of time-outs. Time outs should not be left to the child's discretion ("until she's ready to come back and not do it again"). Ideally, ...


2

From reading your description, many of your child's behaviors are typical. For instance, I've not met many one-year-olds whose learning style falls under the "sit and listen" category. First and foremost, children learn via play. Play allows them to engage in their environment in an experimental manner. As a one year old, "play" can look like pulling a book ...


1

This is typical if not normal. You have many options, but I'll pick what are possibly the top 3: 3) Keep trying until your baby is comfortable with it. This may take months, but most daycares can tell you when things are getting better or worse. 2) Trade off childcare duties with your husband so he has free time at night. This is awfully tough on you, ...


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