81

At most ages your best bet is to agree that it is a kitty, as they are the same - but stress that it is a big kitty; the lion kind of kitty. It is a much more positive learning experience to be able to say "Yes" with some clarifications, rather than "No." 18 months is a bit on the young side of understanding, but if she can see that it is a kitty then she ...


58

Important caveat: I don't speak a word of Russian, so I'm using Google Translate for my examples. I own a cat. Naturally, we always refer to the cat by her name rather than as "cat", so my son has made the logical assumption that all cats are called [CatName]. So, when we are out and about and he spots some random cat and says "[CatName]", my response is ...


54

Overextension is normal Overextension and related phenomena (including the opposite, underextension) are very common, even expected phases in language acquisition. Some children call all four-legged animals "dogs" for a period, while others reject the idea that a chihuahua and a German Shepherd are both "dogs". As a child, I thought that &...


29

On the question of if it is common, I would personally say "yes". I currently have 5 children (ages 2 to 6) in my life that I have close contact with and they all do it when speaking English (not their native tongue). Seeing as your child is already able to do full sentences in two languages, he rather seems more advanced than lagging behind. Be proud of ...


28

I think it's too soon to relate your child's use of gendered language to his own gender. As you say he is two, there's a good chance that he doesn't yet have a full concept of his gender identity. It is usually said to develop around 3 years of age, becoming fully realized closer to age 5. Of course he may be ahead of average, but I think it is more likely ...


26

Keeping in mind that 2 of the 3 meanings of the word "impotent" are non-sexual, you could have likely explained it to a 3-year old. Personally, I would've had no problems explaining the third meaning to my 5-year old either. 10 year olds who still know nothing about sex to me sounds like they're being raised by prudes, and especially from a teacher that ...


20

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


20

This is a clip of the Denver II Developmental Milestones checklist: If you draw a vertical line from the slash in dada/mama specific and the "c" in dada/mama non-specific, you'll have the 8 month old line. The white rectangle is "average"; the blue one means "late but still normal". Falling off the blue box means "possibly prudent to follow-up". There ...


17

Short answer: be assertive and gentle at the same time. Gently let him know that you love him and understand his pain. Assertively (and gently) let him know that he can enjoy life, that he can be happy again. You can't force him to change. but you can show him how and invite him to follow your example. Your concern should be How Can I help him heal, not ...


16

This is one of those rare cases where there's been a scientific study on exactly this topic! The short answer is yes, speaking Russian with your 9mo daughter --- even for just the short visits you describe --- likely will help her build a foundation for learning Russian in addition to the language(s) she is exposed to more regularly. The study Kuhl, ...


15

While there have been studies comparing infant preferences between "baby talk" and "regular talk", finding that "baby talk" was preferred, I'd probably lean more towards the results presented in this study which has controlled for positive affect in speech and found that the preferences followed whichever speech had more relatively positive affect. They've ...


14

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


13

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


12

Just talk with your kid. Have a lot of conversations. Kids have an amazing ability to digest language and separate words into the correct language. They also have the ability to be stubborn, willful and belligerent. If she doesn't want to speak it, you may not be able to change that yet. My daughter is fluent in a second language (her mother's) but it has ...


12

We moved with three kids ages 1-4 from Germany (your name sounds German, so this may be relevant). We were lucky enough to find a pre-school program that was for kids whose first language was neither English, Spanish or Portuguese (large Brazilian population). It worked great and within a year or so the kids were perfectly bilingual for their age. Kid #2 ...


11

I would suggest a 3rd option. Our kids are bilingual in English (used in preschool) and Danish (used at home). They are currently 2 & 4. We speak almost only Danish to them, though we do read some some books in English. Both of them, when starting to speak, started in mostly Danish, then switched to some words in English, some in Danish. We never ...


11

Hi and welcome to Parenting SE! Many children do not start forming sentences until 18-24 months.LINK If you have been to your doctor (and you should if you are concerned), then probably it is still early and there's time before there is anything to worry about. Children develop at different rates. There are things you can do to encourage language. Baby ...


11

As of now, there's no indication of a larger problem. You haven't been correcting her so looks like she's just continuing it out of a habit. Start responding to the questions in the correct manner, not in the manner she expects. I mean, if she says 'Is it hot ?', you should reply 'No it's not , do you think so ?'. When she says 'I will take you out to a ...


11

You might simply say the television persoality was comparing the food to having sex (unless your son had been incredibly sheltered, he's probably heard that much at school from older kids or his age peers, or even watching kids cartoons), and go on to say that the chef was very rude about his choice of compliments. It is related to, and offensive for ...


11

Of course it's a grammar issue. He's just learning to speak and hasn't yet fully made the connection between suffixes and gender. Just a few more months, maybe a year, more interaction with other kids and his language will become normal and non-threatening for Russian society :) To be sure, pay attention how he speaks in second and third person (ты/он ...


10

Based on the information from this site children are usually able to answer simple questions (like the example you have given) by the time they reach 3. At 2.5 years most children are able to answer most yes/no questions. You can also find hints how to improve your child's answering skills. Remember that each child is different. One may start doing ...


9

Most speech concerns are not real worries until a child is 5 or 6. If children continue to have a lisp when they begin elementary school they are generally referred to a speech specialist to work on those sounds. As much as a lisp in a toddler is not a concern, children learn language from imitating what they hear. It is never too young to speak clearly ...


9

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


9

The best way to teach your child English is to not speak it at home. I have a friend who works with non-native kids in a school, helping them catch up. She says the typical profile of the children coming to her are kids whose parents tried to speak the local language with them... badly. The parents have good intentions, but by the time the kids would start ...


9

It's normal, but don't freak out when it goes away! Babies go through an early babbling stage which then stops, and then takes up again in earnest later on. I don't know the exact average timeline, but with my son it was around three months old as well. My parents told me to film him because we'll be sorry when it stops, and indeed, a month or two later he ...


9

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


9

This may not be the most scholarly article devoted to the subject, but it has been borne out again and again in well-developed studies: reading to your child id one of the most beneficial activities one can do with children after the obvious basics (food/shelter/love). Above and beyond the child gaining confidence that she matters to you (because of the ...


9

Consider, for a moment, that what she is pointing to is not actually a lion, but a flat sheet of processed tree pulp painted with thousands of little dots in the image of a lion. Her decision to call it a "kitty" comes from her brain trying to find the best way to communicate with you that she can, in the way she thinks you want to communicate. As a simple ...


9

In Bulgarian, we have the same verb-tense-gender relation (the language is closely related to Russian). My kids (2 boys and a girl, all of them) did similar mistakes at early age. They later learned to speak properly. The issue is pretty much grammar-related. The concept of coordinating the verb gender to the rest of the sentence only in some cases is hard ...


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