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10

I would not spend a lot of time and effort "preparing" him - that way you risk building it up in his mind into a big scary thing. A huge part of pain perception is to do with psychological state and expectations of pain - if you expect something to hurt, it will hurt more than if you don't. So: don't mention it until the day, or even until you're setting ...


8

My wife had her first doctor's appointment and it took exactly 15 minutes. Is that ok? It depends on a lot of factors. The first pre-natal visit (that's what they're called) with an obstetrician should be at least half an hour long, unless your wife saw a trained associate of the obstetrician before that visit, who gathered all the information common on ...


8

First off, the doctor must wash his/her hands after entering the room, period. The doctor opened the door with his hand, right? That's a (major) point of contagion right there. Unless you're in some futuristic practice with automatic doors, I would never excuse the doctor from not washing post-entering the room. Second, unfortunately, doctor handwashing ...


8

First, you need to calm down about it yourself. Children cue off their parents' reactions. If you're freaked out, he will be too. The mildest disease is 100 times worse than a shot. Second, don't lie about what it will be like, or else every time you go to a doctor he will expect the worst. Tell him the facts without either sensationalizing or ...


7

The key to lessening pain of a vaccination is not to tense up your muscles. I had my kids practice "make your arm soft" and poke them with my finger. It's easy to demonstrate that a simple finger poke hurts more on a tense arm than a soft one. Then just as the doctor or nurse approaches their arm with the needle, remind them "make your arm soft" and it ...


6

It's important that your doctor wash their hands, but less important than you might think. As a health care provider, I wash my hands before examining every patient, but it's out of respect for the patient's feelings, not because my hands are particularly dirty (I wash my hands after every patient encounter. I'm unlikely to bring you that patient's germs.) ...


6

You're not losing your "one remaining brain cell". You are absolutely right in wanting the child tested for anything and everything, and with the signs you discuss, I have no idea why your requests aren't being carried out. Regardless of what exactly is going on with your child, a parent's feeling that something is not right is one of the most reliable ...


6

Legally, no medical procedures can be done to minors without parental consent (with exceptions in some states for contraceptive care for teenagers). In practice, doctors who claim emergency medical necessity can basically do what they think is necessary. For more legal advice than that general information, you should ask a lawyer. I recommend you air these ...


5

Not feeling movement is a cause for concern and you should seek immediate help if anything concerns you. Certainly if you have a concern the internet is the last place to seek medical assistance as whoever responds will not be able to examine you nor will they be aware of your medical history. Not feeling movement for a number of days should be a cause ...


5

If you plotted a graph with the x axis as Time spent and the y axis as Quality of care, you would not get a straight line on a continuous incline. Too little time is not good, but there is not a direct corellation between time spent and quality of care, nor would it likely be a bell-shaped curve. Are there accepted standards of practice for what ...


5

Our youngest was "diagnosed" ADD. Turns out he just has a different learning style and is a little boy whose soul needs motion to be happy. So we pulled him from school and he crushes everything he does. That is as long as he can bounce and be upside-down. He does most of his math in his head while bouncing on a trampoline. Point: Be very careful about the ...


4

Medication noncompliance is an issue with about 70% of schizophrenic patients. There are a number of reasons for this, including: Lack of awareness (I'm not sick, so why should I take medication?). This is biological. Denial (patient knows he is sick but refuses to believe it). This is psychological. Side effects which doctors often underestimate. Delusions ...


4

I say, in a clear firm tone "please can you wash your hands before continuing?" If I wanted to be delicate I would say "Sorry, but I didn't see you wash your hands. Would you mind doing so before you continue? Thanks." In England it is always acceptable to remind clinicians about hand hygiene and patients are encouraged to do so. I would raise a ...


4

When I need an annual flu shot or other vaccination, I like to bring my son with me (schedule permitting) so he can watch. Seeing me go through it, understand that we all have to do it, and that it's not a big deal or especially painful, makes it less of an anxiety when he needs to have one himself. We also discussed often (even at age 4) the purpose of ...


3

As naomisl said, legally they can't do anything without your consent, and they have a lot of checks and balances to make sure the right baby gets matched with the right parents. However, a lot of that consent also comes by way of the forms you sign when you are first admitted, in addition to sort of rushed "okays" you give when they ask a question like, "We'...


3

If doctors take issue with being asked to wash hands, patients are not to feel responsible for hurting their feelings as long as they ask in a respectful way. It's the patient's right. A little awkward discussion in the room is far less harmful than an infection. Most doctors will be happy to wash up. They know it's part of their job. If they are ...


3

I would ask in a curious, not attacking way something like : "Don't you need to use these?" (pointing at the sanitizer) "I always thought doctors offices were really picky about those..."


2

Maybe try talking to him about being brave and having courage. How he's a big boy now and he can be very brave, like a super hero that he may like. Do not make a big deal of the vaccinations, say it's 3 pinches, it will pinch for a little bit and it will be over soon. Reassure him that you'll be there with him and will hold him tight. Then you could ...


2

According to the most recent DSM guide used to assist physicians with diagnosis, ADD is no longer the correct term for the disorder; it is now considered to be a subtype of ADHD. So what the OP addresses is in fact ADHD. All afflicted individuals share a core set of just a few of the known symptoms. The presence of the other ancillary symptoms vary in ...


2

I'm just a parent, and only a husband at that, but here it is: Unfortunately doctors schedule patients for 10 to 15 minutes at the most, so the time they are with you will average around that. Some patients won't have questions, and others will need more time, so it tends to average out and works in general, so I'd say that 10-15 minutes is normal for an ...


2

As a (formerly) practicing Ob/Gyn, my initial ob visits typically included the mom-to-be and anyone she cared to bring into the room, realizing some personal questions would be asked. The usual appointment time was about 40 minutes, less for some, more for others. Please realize, this was a couple years ago before managed care became so managed. I generally ...


2

If a real parent was asking how to help their real child with this problem, I would say that it's not the modesty/shyness that's a problem, it's the distress this trait causes the kids, and what it (possibly) says about their relationship with their own body. This is the answer I would give Tracy's parent (as I don't feel qualified to give advice for a ...


1

It sounds like you already have your own answer. These points in your question should be your first check: Licenced Members of the American Psychological Association Approved by your insurer Avoid unproven therapeutic treatments But also look at Reviews and referrals from friends Professionalism in literature Awards If you then have a small number of ...


1

Don't feel bad, I had a doctors appointment today at 1 and left at 3:15. Oh no, not because they cared oh so much about me, but because I'm pretty sure the doctor was running really late. He's pretty rude too.. so I guess you just have to pick and choose your docs, and if you want to get something out of them, stop them and ask. Or else they'll just move ...


1

Different doctors are different. Some really enjoy the prenatal stuff and make a big deal out of it. Others prefer to leave that to doulas or birthing classes, and got into the profession for other reasons. They assume if you have questions or concerns you will bring them up. You may have gotten a doctor on that end of the spectrum. Keep in mind, though,...


1

When we were heading towards a diagnosis for our eldest son (in the UK as well) one of the things we did was to go private for an audiology test so we could rule that out. We needed this step fast to get the autism statement moving before school started so we could get special needs assistance in place. Of course we were lucky to be in a position to afford ...


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