Hot answers tagged

57

Babies/children build up their immune systems by being exposed to germs and dirt. Keeping them away from germs and dirt actually gives them a weaker immune system. (http://www.webmd.com/parenting/d2n-stopping-germs-12/kids-and-dirt-germs) This is not to say that you should bring your baby hang out with plague victims. Some germs (mold etc) can make baby ...


46

Not to take the fun out of devising your own experiment, but the fine fluid dynamics physicists at the Splash Lab (at Brigham Young University) are trying to figure out how to prevent urinal splash-back right now! Fluid dynamics scientists (calling themselves the "wizz kids") set up a water tank and nozzles (emitting colored water) to mimic the natural ...


34

Step 1: See a dentist, have cavities treated asap. Yes, these teeth will fall out, but until then, they act as placeholders for the permanent teeth. There are also sources that claim the deciduous teeth are important for the development of the permanent teeth. (Which will start to appear at around five to seven, that's quite different between kids.) And ...


26

It depends on why they are taking so much time in the bathroom. It could be that they are just enjoying the shower. Or they could be practicing different looks in front of the mirror. Or they could be enjoying the privacy of the bathroom - most teenagers don't have anywhere else that provides complete privacy with a locked door. Make sure they have those ...


22

First, any fast moving stream of anything with mass is going to splatter when it hits something else -- it's really all about the angles (source & target) and velocity as to where it goes during the impact. Toilets are shaped differently, too, with some longer, shorter, taller, etc. You're potty training though -- not refining bathroom skills. Most ...


22

(Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, your doctor or your girlfriend's doctor) It is possible that your girlfriend is experiencing postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The hormonal changes during and after pregnancy are associated with multiple mental health issues, most prominent postpartum depression, but also the lesser known postpartum anxiety and ...


20

A few people have touched upon this (he says sarcastically) but the best way to reduce it is by sitting down. An increasing number of men are sitting when they use the toilet as it's supposed to be more hygienic (as there isn't urine all over the place). I beleive Sweden and Japan are a couple examples of this. Failing that, don't tell him where to aim, but ...


16

It is probably just vernix: Vernix is a greasy white substance that coats and protects baby’s skin in the mother’s uterus. Some babies are born with lots of vernix still on their skin. It is harmless and can be washed or wiped off. Losing vernix may cause the skin to peel during the first week of life. This is normal and will go away on its own. ...


16

You should check for feces between the labia and wipe any globules away as needed. Infections can and will arise if stuff is allowed to sit there. You can gently spread the labia to get a good look and make sure there isn't anything "hiding" in a fold. Soaps and other kinds of cleansers can also create problems so use a moistened cotton ball or swab ...


16

My nine year old boy constantly had soap in his hair after showering, despite being in there long enough to rinse Chewbacca (of Star Wars fame) thoroughly. We installed a hand held shower head (so he could get it right up close to his head,) and it solved the problem. This might work for you too, since your daughter will be able have enough control to rinse ...


14

In addition to @Balanced Mama's answer, you can also start a conversation: "I notice you often forget to flush the toilet. It really bugs me because it's gross when I have to use the bathroom. So this is not working for me. What would help you remember?" Have him brainstorm. Maybe he wants to make a 'remember to flush' sign for example. FYI, "the softer ...


14

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


13

You can't .. don't bother trying. I certainly would not delay bringing up concerns in order to spare the feelings of the staff. Who cares if they like you, and if they are nasty to your child you need a new provider anyway. My advice ... 1/ Be courteous and respectful. In fact be overly so. 2/ Focus on the future, not the past. Don't say "I was ...


13

Yes, this is normal and yes, in large part it will take care of itself (but you might even revisit it again when he is between ten and 13 during the pre-adolescent stage too. To improve the situation, keep doing what you are doing. Also, NEVER flush for him (unless he is going to be gone for a few more hours). If you go in to use the bathroom yourself and ...


13

With a two-year-old it may be a bit of a breech of trust but with my eight-month-old we trim his finger and toe nails when he's asleep. He's too squirmy otherwise. When he's asleep, he's calm and relaxed and doesn't move much at all so it's an easy, non-stress procedure. Of course, you can't continue to do this her entire life... probably doesn't make sense ...


12

Your pediatrician can actually advise on this matter; ours told us that baby scissors are safer than nail clippers. Also, we never cut her nails while she is awake - she moves too much and well, she has better things to do. I always cut them when she is sleeping.


12

We have a 3.5 year old with a similar problem. We took him to a dentist who gave us a $2000+ recommendation, 4 root canals. We went to get a second opinion. The second dentist suggested we do the following: No sugar. This means no juice, no chocolate milk, no candy, etc. Brush after each meal, make certain the decaying teeth get brushed. This can be hard ...


11

For the first few months we used to just bite our kids nails. I know it sounds weird, but one midwife and two aunties suggested this and it seems to be fairly well recognised way to do it. If you do want to use clippers, get the ones with a buffer - this stops you accidentally cutting into the baby's skin - which is quite easy to do if they are wriggling. ...


11

I do a body block by leaning across the baby's belly (without any weight being put on the baby) until I've got things cleaned up, up front. It also prevents the child rolling over and escaping the area where I am doing the changing. I can then move to a better angle for being certain I've got the back end fully cleaned up while knowing that at least the ...


11

Generally speaking anywhere that you can go, your 10-month-old can go too. So really it's about weighing up risk and reward, a task which absolutely lacks black and white distinctions. Obviously if you're letting them explore at all then you need to be aware of your surroundings and your child's capabilities; for example if there are any trip hazards or ...


10

Our Kindergarten, in Northeast US, required potty training to be complete - so the kids can go and take care of themselves. Kindergarten here begins at 5 years, in my area, so I would expect most kids be capale of doing this by themselves. In our DayCare when my son was 4 years he was expected to know most of this, and did pretty well with it, we did put ...


9

Some studies (news article, another article, actual study) have shown that mice fecal matter could contribute to asthma, or otherwise cause allergies in young children. In a study of eight cities, a team from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, US, checked the contents of dust samples from the homes of children with asthma. The team found that ...


9

Toddlers eat dirt and survive, sure. But infants haven't built up a solid immune system to deal with random dirt, so avoiding unnecessary exposure would be wise. I'm sorry but I would agree with your wife. The problem is that a kitchen cloth is actually often not very clean because it's often not rinsed well between uses and isn't replaced often enough. ...


9

I think your three year old nephew sounds pretty normal. I also do not like anti-bacterial soaps and cleansers because I think that ultimately, they do more harm than good.Link:WebMD Recent research has found that levels of antiseptic ingredients in users' urine and blood are higher than previously thought. This raises questions regarding absorption, ...


9

It sounds like either she doesn't believe you (not likely), doesn't care (possibly, depending on her personality), or doesn't know what to do about it (most likely). We aren't born with a natural knowledge of how to clean ourselves. We have to be taught. Also, it's possible she doesn't understand the importance of good hygiene. Obviously, it's easiest to ...


8

Any time, really - no transition work was needed as they saw that we preferred showers so obviously they wanted the same thing. We started ours from around 18 months as they really enjoyed the spray. What we would typically do at that age is just take them in with us - and they can learn to close their eyes and tip their head back to avoid bubbles in their ...


8

Mary Jo mentions a common skin condition. That's probably a good guess and you can easily see the scales on the head. If there are no scales, then perhaps it's just that famous baby smell. I never knew what "baby smell" smelled like before I had a child, but now I know it. It's a very nice smell. Savor it; it will be gone soon. If it's baby smell, then don'...


8

Not entirely on topic but still relevant. My wife contracted Toxoplasmosis while she was pregnant with our 3rd child. It all ended well but it was one heck of a cliffhanger and could easily have resulted in our daughter being severely handicapped or dead. We have no idea how my wife contracted it. So a few pointers may be helpful for others: Get yourself ...


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