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34

Step 1: See a dentist, have cavities treated asap. Yes, these teeth will fall out, but until then, they act as placeholders for the permanent teeth. There are also sources that claim the deciduous teeth are important for the development of the permanent teeth. (Which will start to appear at around five to seven, that's quite different between kids.) And ...


24

You should only let the child pull it out themselves (or leave it to fall out when it is ready if the child doesn't want to pull it). If you try to pull it out you may cause pain or injury to the child. Edit to add: letting it fall out by itself is fine - what would be bad about that? The more ready it is, the less pain and bleeding there will be. Edited ...


12

We have a 3.5 year old with a similar problem. We took him to a dentist who gave us a $2000+ recommendation, 4 root canals. We went to get a second opinion. The second dentist suggested we do the following: No sugar. This means no juice, no chocolate milk, no candy, etc. Brush after each meal, make certain the decaying teeth get brushed. This can be hard ...


8

Your son may have dysphagia, a feeding and swallowing disorder. While there may be physical problems that need to be addressed, generally the disorder is treated with physical therapy designed to strengthen the muscles involved and train the mouth and throat to function properly. The linked article from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association ...


8

It seems in your case a pea sized bit of fluoride free toothpaste until two years of age is the most consistent recommendation. Consider unsweetened toothpaste; the trade off being between building the habit of brushing (sweetness as incentive) and developing a habit of spitting out toothpaste (sweetness being a hurdle). Here are some resources to help you ...


8

First off, the best person to ask about this for your baby is your pediatrician, as they can make sure that she doesn't have anything out of the ordinary going on in terms of dentition. In general, teething on food-safe metal objects that are meant for the mouth is totally fine, as far as I've been able to find. Spoons, cups, etc., all went into my ...


6

There's multiple things that should be done to address it, from education to seeing a dentist. A child not brushing their teeth, in and of itself, doesn't cause tooth decay... the bacterial waste from specific types of compounds, such as sugar, are what causes the decay (in conjunction with acidic food items which dissolve enamel). Everyone likes sweet ...


6

No, the characteristics of milk teeth don't predict much about the adult teeth. Disclaimer: I have no dentistry education; this is my personal experience and beliefs. Milk teeth are smaller because they start out in a toddler's jaw so by the time the child is six, they'll have some gaps between them. These gaps disappear because adult teeth are bigger. The ...


5

I have never read anything that said teethers were bad--where did you read that? If you aren't comfortable with using a teether (which, btw, neither of my kids ever showed any interest in), you can try giving your child a cool, damp washcloth to chew on. Our daughter preferred this, but she will also chew on her fingers if nothing else is handy. My ...


5

We used toddler toothpaste without flouride (there are plenty of choices) up until I saw effort being made about spitting. I'd brush for them and demonstrate what I wanted them to do, and it took a while. My first daughter seemed to do a good job picking it up around 18 months, while my son took until he was probably 24 months or so. The non-flouride ...


5

If you plotted a graph with the x axis as Time spent and the y axis as Quality of care, you would not get a straight line on a continuous incline. Too little time is not good, but there is not a direct corellation between time spent and quality of care, nor would it likely be a bell-shaped curve. Are there accepted standards of practice for what ...


5

I think what you mention is some kind of dental brace (Google search result) and I edited your question a little. I'm not a dentist, but these things are shaped that way for a reason. It follows that its components are all necessary, or else they wouldn't be there. After all, this is not a toy or a gadget that would benefit from any artistic additions. ...


5

Breastfed Babies Can Still Get Cavities It’s one of the most common questions nursing mothers ask: Can breastfeeding cause cavities? Yes, it can. Although natural, breast milk, just like formula, contains sugar. That is why, breastfed or bottlefed, it’s important to care for your baby’s teeth from the start. A few days after birth, begin wiping ...


4

Okay, I've had this one. I had a little boy, about the same age, in my daycare that was a big teeth grinder. It was very random. He would do it for a few days then nothing. Here is what I would suggest. Ignore it. Eventually he stopped doing it. These aren't permanent teeth. They will fall out at some point and unless it becomes some sort of stress thing or ...


4

Usually around age 6, but this varies a lot per children. According to this article from the Baby Center (often very helfup and reliable website), it can vary between age 4 and 7: http://www.babycenter.com/0_losing-baby-teeth-what-to-expect-and-when_3658971.bc


4

First, to be clear, I am ABSOLUTELY NOT diagnosing anything! I have nowhere near enough information to have anything more than a suspicion. Even that suspicion is tenuous at best. In no way should you take my words over the internet as anything other than general information, and you should see a professional for an appropriate evaluation for your child. ...


4

I have always encouraged my kids to wiggle their teeth as much as they can once they become loose. And once they get really loose, they have come up with various ways to speed them on their way, from chewing toffee or apples, through to pliers or string. This is as a direct result of my eldest accidentally swallowing one in his sleep and finding its passage ...


3

I don't think you should worry too much about ingested toothpaste. In some regions, water is fluoridized, causing no harm to the population, so it is safe to assume the health-risks of fluoride ingestion aren't all that big, as long as it is not excessive. If you really feel uncomfortable using regular toothpaste, you could also try to find fluoride-reduced ...


3

I don't know how logical your two-year-old is, but here's what worked for my son: I explained to him that some foods make your teeth sick, and if we don't scrub them off then your teeth will eventually fall out. I told him that if he couldn't be a good helper and let mama brush his teeth, then we wouldn't be able to eat those foods anymore. Then I told him ...


3

Make sure your child's toothpaste contains fluoride and use the amount recommended on the tube. Establish twice-daily tooth-cleaning as non-negotiable. If all else fails, do it by force. This may be very difficult but if you persevere, your child will come to accept it. With a bit of luck you can think of better ways to get it done. Here are a few ideas:...


3

It sounds like he's had some stressful changes in his life. He has been using a method of self-soothing that's working for him, but working less well for you. Putting it into perspective a little bit, he can continue to bite the inside of his cheek, which not only predisposes him to canker sores, but can actually cause cancer (in a few decades, if he ...


3

No it's not a problem. For little kids, make sure you cut anything like an olive or grape into shapes so it isn't round anymore (to prevent choking from trying to swallow a whole grape or something like that) But different people process food differently. If I eat corn I can see the kernels (almost unchanged) the next day too. As long as offer a diverse ...


2

We took my daughter's pacifier away when she was almost 3 (my son never got attached to one). We told her weeks in advance that we'd hang it on the Christmas Tree and Santa would leave an extra present in exchange. We reminded her frequently so it wouldn't be a surprise and she could mentally prepare for it. She cried a bit on Christmas Eve and missed it ...


2

People have been subjected to far worse in the course of human history yet turned out fine, even spectacularly. The only problem addressed in the report in the link is the lack of a problem to address in a report for an author whose career is to address problems in reports. Hold your child and risk teeth grinding. Don't hold your child and risk attachment ...


1

As some of the comments have already stated, perhaps this is not an issue with bad breath originating in the oral cavity. This is no cause for immediate alarm but please bring it up with the child's doctor. Bad breath can result from issues occurring from the stomach. You may notice that after a burp, breath stinks. This doesn't occur because of poor ...


1

Have you taken your son to see a dentist for his teeth? I had the good fortune of having a brother-in-law dentist who looked after my son's teeth almost from birth. A neighbor's child experienced something similar to what you are going through with your child. They had a situation where the teeth were further down in the jaw (neighbor's recount) so it took ...


1

The cheek biting can be a transient tic. With tics, the more you try to legislate, the more entrenched it can get. When you get involved in a fairly pointless tug-of-war, it can be very effective to gently let go of the rope. There are a couple of ways you can turn this so that your son gets some aspects of maturation while still satisfying his sensory ...


1

If you are able to wiggle it back and forth pretty far it's good to go. however, let your kid work on it. I usually waited and pushed it back and forth to provide tearing in the gums from the tooth root until an edge became unhooked. Then I would get floss and tie a loop hooking it onto the exposed edge and then either have my dad or myself pull it out ...


1

I would be inclined to think that if he just got two new first adult teeth in they are quite sharp, and causing minor discomfort which gnawing relieves to some degree. It's easy to forget exactly how incredibly sharp brand new teeth that just broke through the gums are, before they've had time to become dulled through eating and other ordinary activities. ...


1

The only thing I can think of is when permanent teeth start popping out, milk teeth can be on their way hindering permanent from growing in right direction. Besides that, as Torben said, dental hygiene is important for milk teeth, to make a good habit of it in future.


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