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21

That particular irrational fear is common. Take her fears seriously, because they're real to her. Explaining that they are unfounded doesn't work, nor does smiling at or dismissing her fears. If you're reassuring and comforting, she'll learn one more reason to trust you with her feelings (really important) and that it's okay to feel afraid. Then you can work ...


17

You should check for feces between the labia and wipe any globules away as needed. Infections can and will arise if stuff is allowed to sit there. You can gently spread the labia to get a good look and make sure there isn't anything "hiding" in a fold. Soaps and other kinds of cleansers can also create problems so use a moistened cotton ball or swab ...


15

What I have found most effective is to teach them a coping mechanism, something active to do so they don't feel helpless, and give them plenty of time to employ it. For example: Okay, some water is coming. Close your eyes and mouth tightly so it won't get in! Kids often cry because they're scared of water getting in their mouth, which sort of creates a ...


11

Is it drying by towel? As a kid I hated having someone else wiping my face clean, it felt so invasive, demeaning and uncomfortable (and to be honest I think I just got used to fighting it). The washing... I don't know. Maybe give him the option to do it himself? The towel might be a bit too vigorous for his taste (not an accusation! I'm sure you're ...


10

We cured the same problem in my daughter, INSTANTLY, with a cheap pair of swimming goggles. I showed her what they were, what they are for - she pressed them to her face, and that was it. no going back! The same pair got her used to jumping in a swimming pool, and to learn to swim. Now she's nine years old, and an experienced scuba diver!


10

I have dealt with this fear as a babysitter and this always works. Kids never cry when I wash their hair. First get or make some bath puppets. Puppets make a great distraction and kids would rather have the puppets washing a rinsing their hair. Buy a unbreakable mirror. At lunch or anytime way before bathtime show your son the puppets have them talk to him ...


10

@Rory Alsop is correct. First, terms need to be defined. There are basically 4 parts of the ear. The outside of the ear (what you can move around with manipulation) is called the auricle or pinna. Occasionally it can become infected, and this is called malignant otitis externa. It is relatively uncommon. The ear canal (the acoustic auditory meatus or the ...


9

For one, I'd get a plastic mat you can put under the high chair, you can always carry that later to the bathtub and clean it off. I don't think it's going to be too hard to get him to eat at the table. If he throws a fit, or tosses his food away, he's clearly not hungry enough...yet. When he's hungry enough, he's going to eat! Don't give in and take him ...


6

Timing. A hungry, cranky or tired baby won't like bathtime - because it will hate almost everything besides what fulfills his current needs and desires. You need to catch the rare awake and alert window. Temperature. It's not only the temperature of the water (and some babies have their individual preferences, one of mine liked it warmer, one cooler), but ...


6

I think you're making this much more complicated than it really is. Don't worry about showering with your children, no matter what their gender. Your children will answer your question for you by phasing out co-showering on their own once they start getting a feeling for their privacy, provided you give them the opportunity to shower alone. For some ...


5

Our two-year-old has been the same way for the last year and a half. :-/ She likes splashing in the tub and washing the rest of herself, but really, really does not like having her hair washed (drying used to be almost as bad, but has gotten better since we started patting it gently instead of doing it the quicker normal/adult way). I wish I had an answer ...


5

We've been showering (rather than bathing) our daughter since she was about 24 months. If she wants to stand, let her stand, as long as you can get her properly clean. My point is that I can't think of any particular reason to make her sit in the name of hygiene. Perhaps for safety, if she doesn't stand steadily on her own, but then I am usually holding her ...


5

The age limit is high pretty much entirely because of liability, the pool doesn't want young kids drowning or getting heat stroke in there. Some spas also don't want rambunctious kids romping around the adult relaxation space and will ban all under-16s. But the water in a jacuzzi is just sanitized water (chlorine, salt water or equivalent, same as a pool), ...


5

The main concern with a hot tub is the heat of the water. This is not a small concern; heated water at or above body temperature can lead to hyperthermia (overheating), and for smaller children this is a serious risk as they're less able to regulate their body temperature. They may overheat and pass out, and while you are supervising them, this is still ...


5

We had a wonderful midwife who showed us a very neat trick for turning our baby safely onto her front while bathing. I couldn't effectively describe it, but it basically involves cupping the baby's head carefully in your hand, and gently lift and turn the baby, ensuring their nose and mouth is to the side and well clear of the water. They love being on their ...


5

We had something like this for a while but when our son was a bit younger. He also had a similar kind of phobia with sand closer to your daughter's age. What helped for us was to find some new ways to make it fun so he was too interested to worry about being afraid. Could you try getting some new bath toys to get her excited? Or let her take one of her ...


5

The two options we used when camping with babies that age were: Baby wipes - useful in all cases, but especially so for short camping trips, as you don't need to deal with water, heating, disposal etc., and can simply carry out the wipes along with nappies and other waste. Cloth wash - as long as you can heat water, you can then dip a cloth or sponge in it ...


5

I only watched the first video, but it reminded me quite a bit of the way the veteran parents I know here in the USA handle their kids. (In this case, I am defining "veteran parents" to mean "have six or more children", and some of the communities I interact with have a lot of these sorts of families.) In such families, the parents simply can't waste a ton ...


4

I am convinced that for children who don't like showers, it's because they don't like it on their face. I heard too many stories from friends about their child hating showers. Many of them also say their children don't like swimming at the beach. Water at bathtime is fine, but when it's in a bit more of a chaotic situation, their children are not happy. I ...


4

8 1/2 months is close to one of the "wonder weeks", so it's not unlikely that something changed mentally. It's possible the sensory feeling of the water is a problem for him; while my older son never hated baths, he was always the kid at daycare that hated playing with mud/snow/yogurt/jello with his hands, and never finger painted - he just didn't like the '...


4

Our daughter initially didn't like getting her hair washed. It is rather invasive, like Michael said, but washing your hair is just a necessity of social standards. What I started to do was warn her. I'd let her know beforehand "I'm going to wash your head soon". At the same time I'd show her the shampoo and prep a wet washcloth just in case soap got into ...


4

You might try explaining it sometime when you're not in the middle of the situation that when we go potty or use the shower that we should have privacy and that she should respect that. Then try to show her the same privacy (within reason) while she is showering/changing/pottying. Also, a lock on the bathroom door might be in order.


4

Did not mention if you were giving her the baths in a normal tub but that is what I assume. I can offer 3 alternatives but I would guess the last one wont work at this time: Take a shower with her. It's harder to wash their hair (water can't be kept out of their face) but that can be done separately. Be with her in the bath, get in first. We used a big (...


4

An extra-large saucepan is excellent for washing a baby while camping. You can heat the water (not too hot!) on a gas burner and then take the pan off the heat, check the water temperature, and add the baby. I resisted the temptation to add carrots and onions and take a picture. :)


4

I'd give rag baths for a few weeks to separate him from the craziness of the situation. Then, when it's not bathtime, so it's not a stressful moment, I'd let him touch it and play with water going down it. Then coach him to wash his hands cause it's dirty if you feel strongly about the germs or dirt.


3

Every child is different, and the suggestions already posted are good ones. I would suggest one idea that I didn't see posted yet, which is to alternate between a bath and a shower with the drain open. My kids get somewhat fearful when the water is being poured from a cup or bowl, but for whatever reason they think the shower is funny. I started with just ...


3

With my oldest son, the problem was primarily the shampoo in the eyes (or the unsalinated water, but more often the shampoo specifically). What we do is keep his towel at hand, and as soon as we've poured water over his hair, he takes the towel and dries his eyes. This gives him some sense of control (similar to Thorin's mask idea). We also use a ...


3

This worked for my son: I let him wear a swim mask, and put his hand over his mouth when I washed his hair. Then, I let him hold the washcloth while I washed his face. Knowing he could pull the cloth away at any time helped him deal with having his face washed.


3

For a child who is potty trained, or at least is physically ready for potty training (often happens around two, but it varies significantly), this is approachable in a very simple way: ask him to use the toilet prior to the bath. At some point, often around potty training, this will become voluntary for many chlidren - like our three year old - who is ...


3

Something is scaring or upsetting him. Change the routine. I think 9 months is old enough for showers. Maybe try that? Just hold him, sit on the floor and be very careful (to not drop him, splash too much water in his face, etc).


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