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15

What I have found most effective is to teach them a coping mechanism, something active to do so they don't feel helpless, and give them plenty of time to employ it. For example: Okay, some water is coming. Close your eyes and mouth tightly so it won't get in! Kids often cry because they're scared of water getting in their mouth, which sort of creates a ...


11

Absolutely! This is how babies learn at this age - by testing things out and seeing what happens. They don't understand why - but they also don't understand why their feet stick to the ground when they stand up, and that doesn't keep them from walking :) Do be careful that he's not sucking too much air - that can lead to gas, which might be uncomfortable! ...


10

We cured the same problem in my daughter, INSTANTLY, with a cheap pair of swimming goggles. I showed her what they were, what they are for - she pressed them to her face, and that was it. no going back! The same pair got her used to jumping in a swimming pool, and to learn to swim. Now she's nine years old, and an experienced scuba diver!


10

I have dealt with this fear as a babysitter and this always works. Kids never cry when I wash their hair. First get or make some bath puppets. Puppets make a great distraction and kids would rather have the puppets washing a rinsing their hair. Buy a unbreakable mirror. At lunch or anytime way before bathtime show your son the puppets have them talk to him ...


10

@Rory Alsop is correct. First, terms need to be defined. There are basically 4 parts of the ear. The outside of the ear (what you can move around with manipulation) is called the auricle or pinna. Occasionally it can become infected, and this is called malignant otitis externa. It is relatively uncommon. The ear canal (the acoustic auditory meatus or the ...


10

I hate to drink water too. I am not a toddler, but I know how she feels. I hate the way it sits in my stomach. Here are my suggestions (including a few from my mother that worked on toddler-me): adjust the temp. She may not like cold water because it hurts her teeth, or some other reason. Try room temp instead. I actually can stand to drink an 8 oz glass ...


9

I don't imagine you need to boil any water before giving to a normal 8 month old; by six months the baby's immune system is functioning very well. I can't say I've ever boiled water before giving to a child, though we didn't ever give water under six months. However, bottled water unless 'distilled' can and does contain some bacteria. For example, this ...


9

Breast milk is, essentially, water with a bunch of other nutritious stuff in it. Water intoxication can be a concern if an infant drinks too much plain water in addition to breast milk or formula, but that requires a significant volume of water: Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid healthy babies need. If a mother feels her baby needs to take ...


8

Ok, not from a professional, but from a parent's perspective: It seems you have built yourselves a nice battlefield with your son - I sense a power play and a lot of unnecessary tension. A vicious cycle. First step: Stop this right now. That means, no yelling, no fusing and, above all, no force feeding. Try to eliminate this battle ground completely. ...


6

48-50C (118-120F) should be fine as a max temperature, according to Baby Center. As a rule, you should always test the water on a sensitive part of your body, such as the inside of your wrist or elbow. The linked article mentions that babies generally like it cooler, but your experience may vary. My son actually preferred it warmer (to clarify - not "hot" ...


6

I believe what you are asking about is water intoxication. To answer your question simply, yes, too much water, especially in a very short amount of time, can lower sodium levels for an 11 month old, an 11 year old, or pretty much anyone at any age. Babies younger than 6 months and athletes are the most vulnerable. Symptoms of water intoxication are (to ...


6

No, you need not boil the water, especially as your child is already nine months old. The recommendation to always boil is just to be extra safe in reducing bacteria content. Note that even very clean tap or bottled water is not sterile and neither is water that has been boiled for a few minutes. In general the recommendation to wash / boil everything you ...


5

It's hard to tell from the info in your question whether this is a medical issue or a behavioral one, or a combination of the two. It's clear that force-feeding is backfiring and not getting the desired result. We've followed the advice of Ellyn Satter on The Division of Responsibility for Feeding Kids, and it's worked well for our 1-year-old so far. The ...


5

IMHO the human body is quite good at regulating such important things as water and salt balance. Kids will drink if they need to. For the same reason I am not worried when my toddler shakes some salt in his hand and licks that off. It'll even out.


4

I am convinced that for children who don't like showers, it's because they don't like it on their face. I heard too many stories from friends about their child hating showers. Many of them also say their children don't like swimming at the beach. Water at bathtime is fine, but when it's in a bit more of a chaotic situation, their children are not happy. I ...


4

First off, everything has bacteria. It's pretty impossible to remove all bacteria unless you work in a highly sterilized environment. In this case, however, bottled water is mass-filtered and mass-bottled in bottling plants that undoubtedly contain bacteria. No, you don't need to boil bottled water. Boiling water is necessary when you don't know the source ...


4

You might try getting a long shower hose attachment so that he has more control about where the water goes. That way he will be able to wash his body without water getting on his face. After a while he will probably start experimenting with allowing water to touch his face. Everyone is able to be bolder when they feel they are in control of the situation. ...


4

This is normal that she drinks less water in winter time. Is it not the same for you? But about your problem - try using some children water bottles (with her favorite character) and leave it so she can easily access it. add some frozen berries or slice of lemon or orange to glass of water use a straw My 2 year old likes to drink a lot if she can drink it ...


3

The water content of breast milk varies a lot (even during feedings) - much more than a few drops of remaining water would "dillute". Please take a look at this picture from wikipedia: thinner (=more watery) foremilk vs. thicker (=fattier) hindmilk. The only reason to be worried would be if you were washing the bottles with unsafe water, for example if you ...


3

Every child is different, and the suggestions already posted are good ones. I would suggest one idea that I didn't see posted yet, which is to alternate between a bath and a shower with the drain open. My kids get somewhat fearful when the water is being poured from a cup or bowl, but for whatever reason they think the shower is funny. I started with just ...


3

With my oldest son, the problem was primarily the shampoo in the eyes (or the unsalinated water, but more often the shampoo specifically). What we do is keep his towel at hand, and as soon as we've poured water over his hair, he takes the towel and dries his eyes. This gives him some sense of control (similar to Thorin's mask idea). We also use a ...


3

This worked for my son: I let him wear a swim mask, and put his hand over his mouth when I washed his hair. Then, I let him hold the washcloth while I washed his face. Knowing he could pull the cloth away at any time helped him deal with having his face washed.


3

In general toddlers do drink and eat enough for them to survive as long as something is available, so unless there is some very unrealistic and rare disease, there is no need to worry about that. However survive and optimal are different things. Kids usually love everything sweet, so instead of pure water, you might want to add something to it that changes ...


3

We took our 3 along to indoor pools (in the UK) from a very early age. Useful points we learned: kids that age get cold really fast, so make sure the kids pool is heated, or else watch for them getting cold and shivery: be ready with a fluffy towel and cuddles Initially just hold them in the water, then bounce them to make splashes to help them get used to ...


3

My granddaughter (who is 3 years old) has what I call phobia of getting her clothes wet. If any liquid wets her clothes she panics and I have to change her. Same thing with her hair. I have tried everything. She doesn't like wet hair on her back, can't stand the shower, doesn't want her face wet you name it. So what I do now is tell her specifically...I am ...


3

A warm soak doesn't have to be sitting around with hands in a bowl. Try filling a sink, or, even the high chair tray (you will need to refill often probably, and, need several towels or a mop to clean spills) with the warm soapy water and a few toys and see if the baby will play. I don't know too many kids that don't like playing in soapy water. The biggest ...


3

From experience, there are 6 main problems that may cause this: Psychological: fear of inhaling water. This can be addressed by showing how to hold breath and breathe out; and only have head under shower for brief (10-20 second) intervals. Unpleasant feeling of water getting into ears. This can be addressed by either using swimmer's gear to plug the ears ...


3

That's only helpful if your bottle is too full with the full amount of water, making it hard to dissolve the formula by shaking. If that's not the case (i.e., there's enough air above the water+formula), there's no need to fill the bottle in stages. Reading the company's instructions (pointed out by not store bought dirt) we can also see that they advice ...


2

My baby girl has been taking swimming lessons from the age of 3 months, with her head or at least ears most of the time in the water. She's been doing that for 2 years hitherto with a lot of other babies or children without any illness or so, so I guess this is definitely not a big deal. We were also never invited, was it by the teacher or even a MD to be ...


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