Hot answers tagged

33

This is very common. The main thing is not to worry. Most babies lose some of their hair, only to grow more later. And some babies lose all their hair. Your girlfriend could be correct - often it's rubbing on common parts of the head, especially if you always hold them against you the same way, but hormone changes also have a part to play.


17

There are several ways you can tackle this: There are over-the-counter treatments for head lice that you can get at most local pharmacies and grocery stores. You can also get a lice comb and pick out the nits and eggs by hand. However, you have to be VERY thorough; one missed egg can mean an re-infestation. Depending on where you're located, there are ...


13

Personally, I would let her get the haircut in question over the summer break, but not during the school year. At least, I would advise my child against it. This is entirely a matter of opinion, however. It is your child, it is her hair, and I agree with you that she should be allowed to express herself, and that the school rule seems unfair and pointless....


13

I'm going to add to @Rory's answer because there's an important issue which wasn't completely addressed. My gf's take on it is that since we (I) carry her too much, he head rubs in this area and the hair falls. When I hold her, there is definitely contact between my arm and this area. Babies have big heads compared to their bodies, and the head weighs a ...


12

I'm guessing this is a cultural myth similar to "fan death" in Korea. It sounds utterly baffling and silly to anyone outside that culture. No. There's no reason to cut your child's hair - particularly not for reasons of them having a "big head". And, if anything, if the child is very young and wiggly, cutting it can be dangerous as scissors for cutting hair ...


10

Is it drying by towel? As a kid I hated having someone else wiping my face clean, it felt so invasive, demeaning and uncomfortable (and to be honest I think I just got used to fighting it). The washing... I don't know. Maybe give him the option to do it himself? The towel might be a bit too vigorous for his taste (not an accusation! I'm sure you're ...


9

It is an old wives tale, there's no reason not to cut an infant's hair. As you say it is inert, cutting it makes no difference to hair being grown. I don't think it is a question that comes up often because infants generally have so little of it in the first place that cutting it is unnecessary.


8

Life is full of rules. Old rules that are not aligned with society anymore, rules that have been put in place to avoid a specific behavior but have an impact on a lot more people, ... If think that learning to comply with some rules, learning to "fight" against some others, but more important learning to chose your battles are 3 lessons you (should) learn ...


6

The topsy tail tool can be used to help make a plain ponytail if you find your fingers are too cumbersome to manage the hair tie. However, even with thick or long fingers you'll find that using hair ties simply takes time and practice. At first it'll be difficult, time consuming, and the results won't be great, but like tying shoes, after doing it hundreds ...


5

Yes, you can use baby oil or natural oils (almond or olive or canola oil. But avoid groundnut or peanut oil in children under 5.) to loosen thick crusts. It's probably a good idea to do a "spot test" for allergy. This is the information I am using for cradle cap. http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cradle-cap/Pages/Introduction.aspx It's a harmless condition; ...


4

Torben makes a great point, about natural consequences. I agree with Paul Cline about the specific phrasing, but letting the girls experience the natural consequences of their mistake is likely the best medicine for making it stop. Now, since you mention it isn't the first time this has happened, there is some evidence that perhaps the teasing did not do ...


4

Our two-year-old has been the same way for the last year and a half. :-/ She likes splashing in the tub and washing the rest of herself, but really, really does not like having her hair washed (drying used to be almost as bad, but has gotten better since we started patting it gently instead of doing it the quicker normal/adult way). I wish I had an answer ...


4

Shampoo with keratin will aid with straightening using a flat iron, but I don't recommend it. Getting a professional blow out is her best bet. I'm biracial and occasionally want a temporary change. I feel her pain. It is also possible to use large rollers and relax the curls a lot which is satisfying. There is a web community dedicated to us natural curly ...


4

Our daughter has always softly pulled on hair when going to sleep and sometimes just sitting watching TV. However, she pulls on her dolls hair (i'm quite bald!). I don't think there is anything wrong with it and like so many things it will stop in time as she matures. When I was a child I would rub the satin edge of my blanket, also harmless and yes I did ...


4

Edit: When writing the answer below, I had misread "breaking out" as "breaking off". In all cases of rash, pustules, red dots or other changes always check with your healtcare provider first to exclude medical conditions that need professional treatment. Especially fungal infections and oil can be counter-indicative. If the breaking out is simply caused by ...


3

Sure, canola oil is fine to use on the baby's scalp. For cradle cap, you can rub any edible non-nut vegetable oil into the crusted areas, but don't leave it on for hours; wash it off with baby shampoo 5-15 minutes after applying, and brush the flakes of crust off with a baby hairbrush. Repeat every day until gone, then shampoo hair at least twice a week. I'...


3

I'd use an electric hair straightening brush for kids. This will give the possibility for her to have straightened hair without damaging her natural locks. This electric hair straightening tools make straightening quick and easy while treating the hair kindly. I use one myself and absolutely love it and I also straighten my daughter's hair for her from time ...


3

Our daughter initially didn't like getting her hair washed. It is rather invasive, like Michael said, but washing your hair is just a necessity of social standards. What I started to do was warn her. I'd let her know beforehand "I'm going to wash your head soon". At the same time I'd show her the shampoo and prep a wet washcloth just in case soap got into ...


3

A friend of mine had a 10 year old daughter who was losing hair and quite skinny. The family is Hindu and very vegetarian. When the daughter stopped eating enough then it was very easy for her to become malnourished. The mother would make her nice lunches that the child would just throw away at school. She would only have small meals at home. Being super-...


3

We struggled through a good half dozen haircuts with our son on our own. We always had to stop early* when he cried too much for us to bear. His most recent haircut (21 months) was by far the best yet. We actually used a Flowbee (yes, the as seen on tv product from the '90s!) He sat in front of the tv, we cut his hair with the Flowbee, and the vacuum took ...


3

My daughter is 2 and her hair grows "forward" as you described. My hair does not, but my husband's side of family has that trait. Her hair is always in her eyes, so we have to cut bangs. She sees an inexpensive stylist and I explain the issue. Yes, the bangs are fairly straight across and look "baby-ish", and even STILL, hair from the back of her head will ...


3

My baby was born with a full head of straight dark hair. At around 4-5 months it all fell out, he went bald for a few months, and then it grew back a pale golden blonde and slightly wavy! His doctor said there is an aspect of it rubbing off on the crib, the carseat, due to cradle cap, etc, but it's more of a developmental thing. Some children noticeably ...


2

Right now we are in the process of growing out my daughters bangs (She's 2). I usually do the same thing with her bangs everyday, which is basically a small ponytail with them, only with a pull-through. If I just put in a little rubber band (the non-pulling hair kind, usually comes in packages with lots of colors) it will fall out no matter how tight I ...


2

Why don't you take her with you and get her to select a nice colorful cloth elastic head band? In my experience it keeps the hair out of the eyes and gradually conditions it to grow or set in the other direction.


2

Hair loss can be an indication of protein deficiency. I have had many students (primarily girls) who, in an attempt to lose weight, have suddenly decided to go vegetarian or strictly limit their in-take of meat. While they understand that meat tends to be high in calories, they don't usually understand enough about being a vegetarian to know that they ...


2

If her hair is long enough, you could try French plaits - these give the hair a lot of friction, so when you put the hair band on the end it stays together quite well, usually for a couple of days before you need to remove it. If you do just want to stick with a pony tail or bunches, my technique is to give the hair a bit of a twist to hold it together and ...


2

While I rarely have time for doing elaborate styles, I've never found pony tails especially difficult. This is perhaps because I have two younger sisters, and perhaps also because I myself wore a pony tail for a number of years. I spend a few minutes brushing her hair first. (Somehow it's always a complete bird's nest in the morning — yet when my hair was ...


1

Seems like you're looking for Argan Oil. It wont straighten her hair, but it will weigh it down and tame it so to speak. Gives hair a wet look. Shampoos and conditioners with Argan Oil never really worked for me. Other than that only a flat iron will do. The flat iron didn't do anything bad to my hair, just takes 2 hours to do. Male with 3ft long naturally ...


1

As mentioned, you probably want to test for allergies first, this one requires more care but hands down the best thing I found was to take a dry flannel and put about half a teaspoon of 100% tea-tree oil on a small area near the corner of the flannel, then use the flannel to carefully work the tea-tree into the scales. Keep the dry end of the flannel handy ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible