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42

Kids, even well after toddler years, tend to enjoy a hike in different ways than adults. We like taking our three out for walks in the woods, and have done so from infancy (some great baby pictures of Daddy carrying daughter in a sling!). One possibility is that shorter outings will improve her outlook. Having small expectations was the hardest transition ...


31

This pamphlet, put out by the South Carolina Department of Health, suggests it is safe at one month. You should avoid large crowds, but the fresh air and stimulation is good for baby. You should probably not allow people to touch your baby's hands (since baby may put them in his mouth). Your greater concern in going outside is the weather - keeping baby warm/...


20

The guideline I've been given by our pediatricians was to avoid anybody with an easily transmittable disease for the first six weeks. The main reason to stay away from crowds and/or strangers is that you don't really know who in the area is ill or contagious. You don't want somebody to sneeze in your kid's face at any age, really, but a newborn is more ...


18

Unfortunately the specific answer to your question is "yes the law might forbid children from being out and about without supervision, but it depends on the state". I believe the section of law most applicable to this question is "child neglect", and for the most part the definitions of child neglect are left to the states. There is a very wide variety in ...


14

At three or four years old we had this same issue with our oldest daughter. She would get used to me carrying her during the hardest parts of the hike, or when she got tired. Our solution was that I would put her back on her feet when we came across trail markings, and she could only ask for me to pick her back up after two more trail markings have passed. ...


13

I have never heard that strangers are to be avoided with newborns, and I certainly wouldn't recommend staying inside to avoid them. You need to get out for your own sanity, so get out and go for walks as soon as you can. Exposure to new environments and people is good for babies development, keeping them cooped up indoors and away from social contact is not ...


13

Welcome to the club. I think there's not much more you can do besides the things you're already doing. The good news is that the phase where kids stuff things in their mouths doesn't last forever; it will pass. It is also normal behavior. You'll just have to pay close attention while it lasts. The most problematic thing seems to be the running around with ...


11

Could it be that those "few hours walk in the woods" exceeded her range (both in physical endurance and attention span) pretty much from the get-go, so you ended up always carrying her towards the end of the hike? (I got kids age 12 and 8 who get bored of a "hike" in much less than "a few hours". They can run around the playground, and do visits to the ...


11

I don't think there is any connection to indoors/outdoors and introvert/extrovert. However, a 18 month old is really developing very fast, and should be developing social, motor and language skills. it is not clear from your question if your child is cared for in a nursery/daycare or if he/she is at home with you while you work? Do you mean going 'out' ...


9

Somebody asked the same question in a new parents support group we were in after the birth of our son. The answer given was, "You already took your baby outside when you went home from the hospital. Find something else to worry about." Being handled by random people is a different story, but merely being outside the home (assuming adequate clothing and sun ...


8

We took our newborn daughter out to a crowded shopping center, on a busy Saturday, at 3 days old. And being our first child, we were being overly careful with her as only a new parent is! Shock/Horror nothing happened. She grew up fine. You should be careful with newborns, they're immune system may not quite be at full power yet, but equally they don't need ...


8

It's super common for parents and children to disagree about what a child will need to be wearing in the immediate future (eg, when we get outside.) Anyone who lives in a place with a cold winter has had this argument about coats, hats, gloves, scarves, boots and so on. My approach: say once that I think you should wear this. Take your word for it when say ...


8

I haven't seen that movie myself, but Common Sense Media recommends it as not being appropriate for under 16, and the parents and kids reviewing it on the site recommend not for under 13, so I'd be a bit leery about showing it to a 7 year old. There are generally better options for trying to keep your kids safe rather than scaring them, though there ...


8

If you want your son to become more confident around dogs, get a dog or keep visiting the owners of dogs you like and who are good to him. Do not trust a strange dog to be gentle with your child. There is no reason to put your child at risk, and there is always a risk. Even the goofiest Golden Retriever who never bit a soul should not be on the loose near ...


7

I've been camping with a small toddler, and that worked reasonably well. The biggest problem was that he moved around a lot while he slept, so we had to be inventive to keep something soft under him. I will say that camping is generally child-safe as long as you take reasonable precautions. Here are some considerations for you: Kids can sleep anywhere, ...


7

We have a bag that is always packed with diapers, wipes, food pouches, crackers, sippy cup, a bowl, fork & spoon, and a couple of small toys. Before leaving the house we do a quick survey of the bag and make sure that it includes enough of everything for the trip we are taking which only takes a minute or 2 to replenish anything running low. Keeping ...


7

I had the same problem with my four year old and was surprised that just letting her pick out a new colorful pair of running sneakers to "go super fast" was all it took to get her going much further without me carrying her. Maybe I just lucked out, buy you might try making a big deal out of a new shoe purchase. Another idea is grab another kid to go with ...


7

This isn't a terribly surprising thing for a two year old to do. After all, catch games are fun, aren't they? And in the appropriate environment at the appropriate time, there's nothing better to do than simply play along. However, obviously many times this isn't acceptable. The best way I've found to deal with this was to clearly explain to my son what ...


5

I don't think a specific amount is really definable, in particular because each child is different. However, the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) endorses "Caring for our Children", a set of national standards for childcare environments (ie, daycares). Their recommendation: Outdoor play: Infants (birth to twelve months of age) should be taken ...


5

Great question, we have the same problem. What we came up so far: Singing songs, playing games ("I spy with my little eye") etc. Simply telling her that she is too heavy to be carried. Promise a reward if she manages it without carrying.


5

It could be the rough feel of the fabric or a tight fit in some parts that she finds uncomfortable. If she doesn't like the tight waist, she may like bib-overalls. I have also seen jeans lined with sweatpants type of material that she may find more comfortable, although it is significantly warmer and probably only appropriate in winter. In summer you ...


5

One trick which worked marvels for me was, saying to him: if you are tired, you can run and wait for me under that tree over there, sit down and relax. My son was often too tired to walk, but not tired enough to run to a shade under a tree where he can sit and look at me as I was walking.


5

The two options we used when camping with babies that age were: Baby wipes - useful in all cases, but especially so for short camping trips, as you don't need to deal with water, heating, disposal etc., and can simply carry out the wipes along with nappies and other waste. Cloth wash - as long as you can heat water, you can then dip a cloth or sponge in it ...


5

No, you should be fine. People think of babies as extremely delicate, and they are a bit fragile, but they aren't THAT fragile. I think some of this impression comes from "shaken baby syndrome," but people don't realize the degree of force with which those babies get shaken. A bumpy ride isn't going to damage the nervous system, or else they'd never let ...


4

Where to put babies in the tent is something that varies from baby to baby and over time for the same baby. We took our kids camping (with a car parked next to the tent) at two months of age or so, and canoe camping after 11 months. That's where all your stuff is in the canoe and you paddle all day then set up camp, repeat for several days. Of all the ...


4

An extra-large saucepan is excellent for washing a baby while camping. You can heat the water (not too hot!) on a gas burner and then take the pan off the heat, check the water temperature, and add the baby. I resisted the temptation to add carrots and onions and take a picture. :)


4

It's not clear where you're located, but even in a semi-rural area, it's inappropriate to have a dog off leash. For the safety of others, as well as the dog. If you're living in an area where it's acceptable to have dogs running free, my answer does not apply. At 5 years old I would not expect my son to be able to handle a large dog coming at him, ...


3

Try an alternative to carrying her the rest of the way. Instead of having her be carried the rest of the way for the hike, start taking short (15 minutes or so) breaks to let her rest for awhile, before continuing on the trail. This will mean that it will take longer for you, and you may have to shorten the full length of the trip, but it will give her ...


3

My daughter also refused to wear jeans, until the kids were told they had to as part of their fifth-grade nature's classroom field trip. (Actually they were told they had to wear long pants -- no shorts allowed -- but thinking of all the hiking through the rocks and woods they would be doing that fall week, I insisted it had to be jeans.) After winning ...


3

While Torben's ideas are all pretty sound, clear and complete, it is actually not a good idea to make such cards too visible. Slapping something on his back with his name on it actually makes it easier for someone who would take advantage of children to do just that. Still, put the cards in his backpack, shoe etc. but avoid making it really easy to find ...


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