25

According to the study titled The possible role of human milk nucleotides as sleep inducers published in Nutritional Neuroscience, a link was found between certain levels of nucleotides contained in breast milk over a 24 hour period. The conclusions portion stated the following: Conclusions The assay of nucleotides in the breast-milk of the study population ...


15

The current scientific consensus is: No. It is not necessary to sterilize bottles, not even for newborns. The only exception are bottle teats made of rubber - the rubber can become porous over time, so occasional sterilization is recommended. However, most bottle teats are made of silicone, which is not affected. The primary safety measure to take with ...


13

The deposits from hard water are just calcium carbonate, aka chalk, and magnesium carbonate. They are completely harmless. This report by the World Health Organisation gives a good overview of what is known on the subject. The main conclusions from studies are in section 3.3. Assuming you are getting enough calcium and magnesium from your diet (which you ...


11

I've never seen an establishment prevent parents from giving bottled (as in baby bottle) milk to their kids, whether that is breast milk or formula. Very few places (none?) will be prepared to correctly prepare a baby bottle to force you to buy it directly from them. Think of all the issues involved in that. I would be extremely surprised if they gave you ...


11

Absolutely! This is how babies learn at this age - by testing things out and seeing what happens. They don't understand why - but they also don't understand why their feet stick to the ground when they stand up, and that doesn't keep them from walking :) Do be careful that he's not sucking too much air - that can lead to gas, which might be uncomfortable! ...


10

Children need to learn to eat and it is slow and difficult work. At 6 months or so the food they get by spoon or hand may or may not serve any nutritional purpose, but is part of that learning process for them (and for the adults trying to get it into them.) As time goes past between that first mouthful and say the one-year mark so much happens: the baby ...


9

Breast milk is, essentially, water with a bunch of other nutritious stuff in it. Water intoxication can be a concern if an infant drinks too much plain water in addition to breast milk or formula, but that requires a significant volume of water: Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid healthy babies need. If a mother feels her baby needs to take ...


8

I'd say as long as she's not having an excess amount of gas pains then she's fine. There will always be some bouts of gas pain to deal with (at those times we found that moving my wee girl's legs around in a slow bicycle motion and tummy rubs tended to help). As babies age their digestive systems change. Her little stomach will grow and strengthen, she'...


7

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


7

5 months old is far from "extended" use of the bottle! Now that I've seen this question, your other question also makes a lot more sense. There is evidence that indicates babies fed with breast milk are less likely to develop early childhood caries (cavities), as well as a number of other diseases. Many breast-fed babies also use bottles while mom is ...


7

In general, while I would be surprised if they did not let you in, the best way to find out is to ask them. Contacting the establishment in question is the appropriate and most accurate way to clarify policies that you are unsure about. So, you could probably just go with the bottle, but to be sure find some contact info (perhaps they have a web site or a ...


7

No, this is probably nonsense. Did the people telling you that cite any sources? As you pointed out, any air trapped in the milk will quickly bubble out. If you wait a minute before feeding, there will be very little air left. As to vitamin A, it is true that it is broken down by oxygen, but I don't think a bit of extra air due to shaking will make much of ...


6

I have a few suggestions based on my own experience and the experience of friends: Stay hydrated; dehydration will negatively impact your milk supply. Sleep (safely) with your baby. Increased access to night nursing will help maintain milk supply. Even if you only keep the baby in your bed part of the night it will help. Ideally you will become so ...


6

My baby had reflux so hiccuping was especially problematic for her as it churned things up EVEN More. So we had to work hard at getting all the gas out for her. We found the traditional burping position didn't actually do this. It was easier to burp her by placing her in a seated position on the adult's knee, with her legs dangling inward. Since I am ...


6

If your daughter is gaining weight well, I would just let her self soothe back to sleep and consider it a blessing that she is able to do so. I would not wake her up to feed. I think that if she was really hungry, she would eventually cry. My own daughter (second child) was also breastfed and began sleeping through the night at 2 months old. She also sucks ...


6

Sorry, but twelve hours without feeding is way too long for a baby. You also can’t (and probably shouldn’t, if you want to save your own sanity and ability to function) reverse the day/night cycle, because even if you were able to do so, you’d be giving up sleep. And most babies at that age will feed at least once during the night, so this wouldn’t solve ...


5

Talk to your doctor about her nighttime habbits. Also I would think that it is probibly time to say bye bye to the bottle. Again, double check with the doctor but they need to get all their nutrition during the day. We stopped night time bottles with my son around 8 months if I remember correctly. It was hard for all of us. He would wake up and cry for a ...


5

It is difficult to assess bottle risk as separate from formula risk, because formula is delivered by bottle, where breast milk generally is not. Therefore the results of studies on either may or may not be generalized to both. Some points to consider regarding bottles in particular: Some germs are not killed by boiling. Sterilization may not be enough ...


5

My son was born at 24 weeks and he would only burp after every second or third bottle. The NICU doctors and feeding specialists all said it is normal and that some babies just do not burp like people expect since burps are just air in the stomach. If you are really worried that she is swallowing too much air and for some reason is not able to burp then I ...


5

See WebMD: In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is ...


4

What we were recommended, and found incredibly useful, was to use ice cube trays. Then once the milk has frozen in cubes you can put as many as you need into bags, clean and sterilise the trays and make another set. This meant we could easily take the amount we might need for that half-day, day, weekend or however long.


4

We had a similar problem. The solution was for us was to put a leakage-proof water bottle into her bed. She would wake up at night, take a sip, lie down again and continue sleeping. The bottle would just lie beside her ( It was a NUK Easy Learning Cup ). That gave her the comfort she would need at nightly sleep interruptions. After we got a bigger bed for ...


4

I had the same problem and corrected it. Let me give you the insights I learned during this process and some things I tried to get the biting to stop, which it eventually did: The gums rise significantly before the teeth come out and affect the way a baby latches (to a bottle or breast). At 6 months the baby starts eating more solids, which means they need ...


4

Some suggestions you could explore: Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


4

Sterilization using solely water or steam would indeed take more than five minutes. Steam that is just at 100°C would take close to an hour and a half to completely sterilize the vessels - and a better process is to repeat it several times (Tyndallization, referenced in that article as well). However, you're not just using steam here; you're also washing ...


4

Until babies do notice, the solution is just to gently remove the bottle, and either replace with another bottle if she still needs more, or let her suck on a (clean) knuckle or fingertip. You shouldn't let her just suck on air, as she will need to burp a lot, and until she does it could be uncomfortable for her. Have you looked at how much you are feeding ...


3

If you currently can't keep up with demand, supplementing with formula will not change the amount of milk you produce. You will still produce what you currently manage, but will also be able to top up baby. We did exactly this - giving all three of ours a bottle of formula as the last feed at night. Benefits: I got to be useful at the nice end of the baby,...


3

The guideline is that you can add fresh milk to frozen milk as long as the amount of frozen is greater than the amount of fresh you add. Otherwise you raise the temperature of the frozen milk into a risky range. The usual strategy is to use breastmilk storage bags such as Lanisoh's, Medela's, Ameda's, or I am sure there are other options. Since breastmilk ...


3

Most brands recommend replacing the nipples on a regular basis usually 3 months I think, however I've found they tend to last longer than their recommendations. Usually by the time the baby is ready to move to the next flow the nipples are still working fine. It helps to take good care of them and not use brushes to clean them. As to how to tell if there's ...


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