25

According to the study titled The possible role of human milk nucleotides as sleep inducers published in Nutritional Neuroscience, a link was found between certain levels of nucleotides contained in breast milk over a 24 hour period. The conclusions portion stated the following: Conclusions The assay of nucleotides in the breast-milk of the study population ...


15

The current scientific consensus is: No. It is not necessary to sterilize bottles, not even for newborns. The only exception are bottle teats made of rubber - the rubber can become porous over time, so occasional sterilization is recommended. However, most bottle teats are made of silicone, which is not affected. The primary safety measure to take with ...


13

The deposits from hard water are just calcium carbonate, aka chalk, and magnesium carbonate. They are completely harmless. This report by the World Health Organisation gives a good overview of what is known on the subject. The main conclusions from studies are in section 3.3. Assuming you are getting enough calcium and magnesium from your diet (which you ...


11

I've never seen an establishment prevent parents from giving bottled (as in baby bottle) milk to their kids, whether that is breast milk or formula. Very few places (none?) will be prepared to correctly prepare a baby bottle to force you to buy it directly from them. Think of all the issues involved in that. I would be extremely surprised if they gave you ...


10

Children need to learn to eat and it is slow and difficult work. At 6 months or so the food they get by spoon or hand may or may not serve any nutritional purpose, but is part of that learning process for them (and for the adults trying to get it into them.) As time goes past between that first mouthful and say the one-year mark so much happens: the baby ...


9

A six month old can sleep up to eight hours without feeding. We had the issue that I had to work (+ commute) while breastfeeding and was getting utterly exhausted by having to wake up for night-time feeds. A pediatrician told us that our then six-month-old son is asking for his night-time bottles because of the comfort and company and not out of hunger. We ...


9

Breast milk is, essentially, water with a bunch of other nutritious stuff in it. Water intoxication can be a concern if an infant drinks too much plain water in addition to breast milk or formula, but that requires a significant volume of water: Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid healthy babies need. If a mother feels her baby needs to take ...


8

I'd say as long as she's not having an excess amount of gas pains then she's fine. There will always be some bouts of gas pain to deal with (at those times we found that moving my wee girl's legs around in a slow bicycle motion and tummy rubs tended to help). As babies age their digestive systems change. Her little stomach will grow and strengthen, she'...


7

5 months old is far from "extended" use of the bottle! Now that I've seen this question, your other question also makes a lot more sense. There is evidence that indicates babies fed with breast milk are less likely to develop early childhood caries (cavities), as well as a number of other diseases. Many breast-fed babies also use bottles while mom is ...


7

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


7

I think you can talk to your child at any time, keeping in mind that it may be distraction, especially when it is time to go to sleep. During breast-feeding, the child will be focussed on feeding, and will generally be in a quite relaxed state. Talking gently during this time is likely to be good for the bond with the child, but it could also be distracting....


7

Boiling water Leaving bottles and nipples in boiling water for a certain time is the "classical" method for sterilizing bottles etc. However, I found this relatively impractical as it is very difficult to get the bottles out of the pot afterwords (I usually took clean (unused) barbecue tongs) you have to put them somewhere to let the water drip off (I ...


7

In general, while I would be surprised if they did not let you in, the best way to find out is to ask them. Contacting the establishment in question is the appropriate and most accurate way to clarify policies that you are unsure about. So, you could probably just go with the bottle, but to be sure find some contact info (perhaps they have a web site or a ...


7

No, this is probably nonsense. Did the people telling you that cite any sources? As you pointed out, any air trapped in the milk will quickly bubble out. If you wait a minute before feeding, there will be very little air left. As to vitamin A, it is true that it is broken down by oxygen, but I don't think a bit of extra air due to shaking will make much of ...


6

This Parents article recommends only sterilizing baby bottles once: when you take them out of the package before you use them for the first time. The exception to this is if you have well water you might want to sterilize more frequently. Initial sterilization can be accomplished most cheaply by boiling water. If you plan on sterilizing more frequently, ...


6

I have a few suggestions based on my own experience and the experience of friends: Stay hydrated; dehydration will negatively impact your milk supply. Sleep (safely) with your baby. Increased access to night nursing will help maintain milk supply. Even if you only keep the baby in your bed part of the night it will help. Ideally you will become so ...


6

My baby had reflux so hiccuping was especially problematic for her as it churned things up EVEN More. So we had to work hard at getting all the gas out for her. We found the traditional burping position didn't actually do this. It was easier to burp her by placing her in a seated position on the adult's knee, with her legs dangling inward. Since I am ...


6

If your daughter is gaining weight well, I would just let her self soothe back to sleep and consider it a blessing that she is able to do so. I would not wake her up to feed. I think that if she was really hungry, she would eventually cry. My own daughter (second child) was also breastfed and began sleeping through the night at 2 months old. She also sucks ...


6

Sorry, but twelve hours without feeding is way too long for a baby. You also can’t (and probably shouldn’t, if you want to save your own sanity and ability to function) reverse the day/night cycle, because even if you were able to do so, you’d be giving up sleep. And most babies at that age will feed at least once during the night, so this wouldn’t solve ...


5

The American Academy of Pediatricians recommends stopping bottle useage at age 1. Many pediatricians recommend making the switch away from the bottle by 15 months. Others set the limit at 18 months. A few say the switch is not necessary until 2. The concerns with extended bottle feeding are: Children who were still bottle feeding at age 2 were more likely ...


5

It is difficult to assess bottle risk as separate from formula risk, because formula is delivered by bottle, where breast milk generally is not. Therefore the results of studies on either may or may not be generalized to both. Some points to consider regarding bottles in particular: Some germs are not killed by boiling. Sterilization may not be enough ...


5

Talk to your doctor about her nighttime habbits. Also I would think that it is probibly time to say bye bye to the bottle. Again, double check with the doctor but they need to get all their nutrition during the day. We stopped night time bottles with my son around 8 months if I remember correctly. It was hard for all of us. He would wake up and cry for a ...


5

My son was born at 24 weeks and he would only burp after every second or third bottle. The NICU doctors and feeding specialists all said it is normal and that some babies just do not burp like people expect since burps are just air in the stomach. If you are really worried that she is swallowing too much air and for some reason is not able to burp then I ...


5

See WebMD: In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is ...


4

With our firstborn, we started with a couple varieties of microwave steam sterilizer. These come in two basic flavors; disposable and durable. The durable kind is basically an enclosed drying rack with a tray underneath for water. Put water in the tray, fill up the rack, place in the microwave for 6-10 minutes, and viola, sterilized bottles. The disposable ...


4

We've gotten by with two children using soap, bottle brush, and water. I think the main risk for contamination is in handling raw foods, meats and vegetables. Make sure to clean your hands, counter tops, and put away contaminated wash cloths after handling raw foods and before you touch baby's food, bottle, or nipple.


4

I think baby bottle addiction was much more of a concern before the advent of sippy cups. There are many good reasons to break your child of a bottle including Dental hygiene Drinking from a bottle all day and/or all night can cause tooth decay even in teeth that haven't emerged yet. Both breastmilk and formula have lactose in them which provides food ...


4

What we were recommended, and found incredibly useful, was to use ice cube trays. Then once the milk has frozen in cubes you can put as many as you need into bags, clean and sterilise the trays and make another set. This meant we could easily take the amount we might need for that half-day, day, weekend or however long.


4

Some suggestions you could explore: Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


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