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34

It looks from your post that you have very good reasons not to let your mother stay at your place. It seems that in spite of seeing all the reasons why this is a bad idea you are still hesitant. A few points to consider: If your mother stays even for one night it will be harder to ask her to leave or not to repeat her visit in the future. Not everyone ...


22

I agree with Ola M. You have to draw the line and then stick to it. "Sorry Mum, you can't stay with me." If you make excuses, she is going to be able to find 'solutions', so the only way is to tell the truth. You said you father understands, so I'd tell him the unvarnished truth and see if he has a way of telling your mum that won't be as hurtful. Perhaps ...


16

It sounds like your mom and you need to work on your communication skills, together. This isn't uncommon in the teenage years; you're basically an adult now after all, and it's hard for both of you to work out exactly what that means for your relationship. One of the common issues you have in a relationship like this is escalation. When you were five or ...


13

That question and answer you linked said everything about why you absolutely should tell the child the truth. At seven your grand is perfectly capable of understanding the concepts of right and wrong; understands making mistakes and also understands punishment. The mother is paying for the mistake she made. If it is true, say that Mother is sorry and is ...


9

There is exactly one age when this should stop: When one of the individuals concerned is no longer happy with the sleeping arrangements. Assuming that your real question is somewhere along the lines of "Is this going to mess with the development of the five yo., sexually or otherwise?" - No, he will be fine.


8

Some people believe in attachment theory quite strongly, and would apply it to this type of case. If your child has an insecure attachment, the best approach is to try and secure that attachment. Make sure that you are not expecting your child to grow up too quickly. When mum has to go, she has to go, just step in there and try and comfort your little one ...


7

When she starts yelling at you, stop/pull over at the earliest point possible and tell her to get out of the car. Most people are taken aback by this because it's something they almost never hear. She will probably then ask why, which is your cue to explain to her that her yelling is distracting you and you do not feel safe with her in the car and are ...


6

There are a couple possible causes that children act differently for one caregiver. Kids are known to save their stresses for their primary caregiver. So much of the frustration they felt at daycare they release not there, but in the safety of their mom's (or dad's) presence where they know they will still be loved after throwing a fit. Parents magazine ...


5

I can reference my own experience here: Our 5-year sleeps on our bed. He goes to be in his own bed, and gets up and moved to our bed in the middle of the night. He is turning 5 shortly, and recently he has had nights where he doesn't go to our bed. Most nights he sleeps in our bed. We made the decision to neither encourage nor discourage co-sleeping with ...


5

For some reason driving seems to bring out the worst in a lot of people. It can be frustrating from the driver's seat and frustrating as a passenger hence road rage and "back seat drivers". I don't suppose that your mom is yelling on purpose so I don't think that trying to explain to her or asking her nicely to change her behaviour will work. Some people are ...


5

I agree with Henry, you need to make sure that someone is there that is compassionate towards the child to ensure he is comforted when mom isn't around. One thing that I did for my little guy was let him carry around a picture of him and mom together. When he would start crying I would let him know that mom had to go to work and would be home before he ...


5

Try a warm compress on the knot for a few days, several times a day. She can also try to GENTLY massage the knot towards the nipple; if it's a blocked duct, the warm compress should loosen it up, and then she can massage it out of the nipple. If she presents with a fever or pain, or anything that seems like it could be an infection, make sure she heads to ...


5

There is an art to breast-feeding and it takes a bit of learning but here are some things mom can do to help prevent challenges along the way: Make sure baby's mouth is all the way on when latching. To really get baby fully latched on, her mouth should be wide open and it will feel a bit like the breast is being shoved on her, but it helps her feed better ...


5

I think you're making this much more complicated than it really is. Don't worry about showering with your children, no matter what their gender. Your children will answer your question for you by phasing out co-showering on their own once they start getting a feeling for their privacy, provided you give them the opportunity to shower alone. For some ...


5

As someone who suffers from depression and anxiety and was finally diagnosed with ADHD in their 30's, I feel your pain on this one. What can you do to convince your mother you have them? Unfortunately, it sounds like nothing. You've tried that and she doesn't believe you. Whether it's because she doesn't believe that these things exist at all or just ...


5

If you have undertaken every measure that you know of to discipline your child without success, I would suggest visiting a child psychologist for help. A psychologist can help to identify factors affecting your child's behavior that you may not have considered, and may suggest further investigation if they suspect an underlying physical or neurological ...


4

This is the most beautiful feeling you will ever feel. All good and normal parents do feel protective. Just know that you have to balance this with your child's needs. It is alright to feel protective, but it will be wrong to keep him locked up. Let him explore in a good way. Know that feeling protective over your child will only add to your and his ...


4

You might try explaining it sometime when you're not in the middle of the situation that when we go potty or use the shower that we should have privacy and that she should respect that. Then try to show her the same privacy (within reason) while she is showering/changing/pottying. Also, a lock on the bathroom door might be in order.


4

You say, She agrees with my point of view, but seems to be unable to look at her own behavior in an emotionally detached way in practice. Thus she is unable to amend it. She still continues to think of him as a child rather than a grown up man. Your mother also sees you as a child (though she may not treat you in the same manner), and it's hard for some/...


3

In short, grow up, act like an adult and face the concequenses or let your mother dictate your traveling habits as long as you travel with her. You have two basic options, take what you want and no more and have her shout at you or take what she thinks is needed and be overpacking. If you feel the peace at home is most important, pack what she wants you to ...


3

Given it's only the nipple and not the areola that's affected, most likely the baby does not have a good latch. A good latch should be well up on the areola, with the nipple going into the baby's mouth far enough that the sucking comes more from the throat than from the mouth. This should also help cut down on the chewing and biting, and make them less ...


3

It's not normal having pain while breastfeeding. If she feels any pain, the latch maybe it's wrong. The nipple has, beside this oval shape, the tip like a lipstick? That sometime it is a sign from short tongue tie. If the baby's tongue has the tip like a heart when you see it, maybe it's that. Or your baby doesn't put enough areola in her/his mouth. When a ...


3

Trust your wife. If she has chosen to be a stay-at-home mom, don't micromanage her. If she feels up to the task of running your busy household (three small children) without help, let her thrive. If you insist on bringing in outside help when she says she doesn't want it, you are sending a vote of "no confidence" and undermining her in her domain. Let her ...


3

Being protective like this is completely normal. With my first child, I tried not to let anything happen to him and ran to him for every cry. I wanted nothing but the best for my baby. I now have three boys and my wife is pregnant again. The boys are always hurting themselves by falling down, running into things, fighting with each other. Children, and ...


3

You don't mention, but I bet when this was happening you were also experiencing some morning sickness. When your body feels like it's going to vomit, saliva production increases to help protect your upper GI tract from the acid. In late pregnancy when acid reflux can be a problem, you can also get a lot of saliva or mucus as a reaction to the irritation of ...


3

You are receiving some pretty good advice already but I'd like to point out my own perceptions. First, I don't think you're fully accepting who your mother is. This is a person who has caused you to have suicidal thoughts. Is allowing your mother back into your life worth your own life? I would hope you are answering a quick "no". If not, please seek ...


3

I'm sorry that you are experiencing this tough situation. I will give some examples of things that you can try saying, but it is important to remember these things: we can't change other people (I have tried a few times!) we can't "make" someone feel a certain way (younger children are much more vulnerable, so they are an exception to this... And violent ...


2

Well, I have no easy answer for you. Just remember that crying is only a child expressing his opinion. It's up to YOU to decide if that opinion is correct or not and whether it deserves attention. Of course, responding to crying is BUILT INTO us biologically and can't be ignored. But your logical brain should always trump biology. Your job as a parent is ...


2

My advice would be to get an au pair to assist with the childcare and household duties to give your wife a break. Either pay for an au-pair, use something like workaway.info to advertise for free room and board in exchange for duties, or try to encourage more involvement from family. When we did this it was truly a marriage saver and our child really ...


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