171

I am a retired teacher and I am shocked that this teacher felt that was appropriate. I'd start by talking to the teacher -- but you hang on to the papers. IMO, and probably the vast majority of parents and teachers, we are trying to build up children and encourage them into enjoying the learning process. We are not there to tear them down. If the teacher ...


147

This teacher is carefully producing a future math-hater. I've worked with enough high school students to know. I've also worked with enough people in personal counseling to know that whether you care to face it or not, this sort of work is NOT accidental. This is a deliberate, even if unconscious, effort to sabotage your child's learning. At that age the ...


55

I agree with the other answers. This was not an appropriate way to correct the child's homework. From just this example, I would guess that the teacher was more interested in obedience than initiative, which is definitely not good. (He was asked to write from one to 30. He wrote from 2 to 50. Personally, I would have been pleased as punch, and said so.) I ...


51

...knowledge and mastery ought to be its own reward. Question: do you work (at your job) for free because it's rewarding and what you want to do? No, you work because you get a paycheck for it. (I did do some of my work - but not the majority - for free.) Ideally knowledge and mastery are its own reward, but that's not real life. Pardon my skepticism, but ...


42

When your child is at school the teacher is in loco parentis (literally "in the place of parents"): meaning that they should treat each and every child as if they were the parent, nurturing both their educational and more abstract needs (emotional etc.). This is not a role for everyone, and teachers should be held in great esteem for what they do, as it is ...


38

I'd like to add a different perspective: I assume that the red writing was done by the teacher. This would make the entire page a form that your child was supposed to fill in in a very specific manner. Each cell with a red dot was supposed to be filled with a single digit. You will notice there are three pairs of two columns with 10 rows each. Plus one ...


36

Consider the possibility of a learning disability, ADHD, or other obstacle that's interfering with his ability to either learn the material or express his knowledge. The issue may be a lot bigger than struggling with homework, and it's common for such children to see themselves as stupid or dumb — they know they're behind their classmates, and this leads to ...


35

I think a large concern here that has not been brought up is the destruction of evidence of progress. Even if your child should do it again, and even if they do do better, they will have no way of knowing they did so because the Original work does not exist anymore - problematic because one of the primary motivators at that age is visible progress. I ...


17

I would agree with you that this is not the right way of checking homework of a 5 year old. It can be very discouraging to the child. I do not think the teacher should erase the homework even if the quality of work was not great. Which is not the case - looking at the photo the work is done very well for a 5 year old. Firstly, I would like to make sure ...


14

There is a very simple reason why you should not do your son's homework: The results of homework assignments show the teachers whether what he taught was understood. Think of the following scenario: Teacher teaches subject A. Homework covers subject A. Most homework is returned mainly correct. ->Teacher assumes it to be understood and moves on to ...


14

I had similar issues when I was growing up. Let's break this down. Your son is affable and well-liked by his teachers - so it's not a behavioral issue. With increases in homework, it's possible that your son is getting stressed by his increased workload. John's mention of forgetting terms and shortcuts over the summer months is also probable. Help him by ...


14

I am retired now and have had two distinct successful careers. However I went through a lot of problems educationally. For several years (under the age of 9) I was short-sighted but undiagnosed. Whenever there was a school sight test I would go close to the chart and memorise it so that when it was my turn, I could pass. During class I would regularly ...


14

If this is pre-school, his teacher may not be an actual teacher that completed an elementary education, or early learning course. Many pre-school teachers that work in day care centers are very well trained, take course work on early childhood education, and may or may not be currently enrolled in a college level course. Some, however, are (or at one time ...


13

Try making sure it is fun, for younger ones, and works towards a goal, for older kids. I always enjoyed homework, and one of my children does too, so it is very easy to just steer her homework the right direction and offer support when there are difficulties. My eldest sees the value in homework as he knows what he wants his career to be, so for him the ...


12

I disagree with removing hockey. Why? I remember being in the exact same situation and how it affected me as a person. When I was that age, I had one thing: music. It was my passion. At 13 I was writing Manilow-like music (it was 1978) on our horrible piano and I was playing trumpet and french horn at school. Meantime, my grades in Civics, Math, etc, ...


12

The number one change we made that helped with this issue was eliminating all screen time (computer, television, tablet, everything except dedicated eReaders) during the week. This drastically cuts down on the available "more interesting" options, and if any homework requires computer use it becomes almost a treat because they get to use the computer outside ...


11

The first issue is that kids that age don't think that far into the future. Something that happens several hours away isn't motivating for them. It needs to be more immediate. Otherwise, it feels to them like they were forced to do things they didn't want to all day, then to top it all off on a completely unrelated note, they don't get dessert either. ...


10

I agree with the points in Stephie's answer. The first step is to stop doing his assignment for him: not only is it cheating, he simply isn't learning. The entire purpose of schoolwork, whether at school or at home, is to educate him through practice. However, that does not mean completely disconnect from his homework. Especially if you have always been ...


10

My sons went through hell and we became enforcers for pretty much no result. They both did well and are now both happy and enjoying life. School on its own can be tough for kids without home being like a labour camp. The comment about personal responsibility and understanding consequences is an important one but let home be a respite not a burden. The ...


9

While I don't think that the erasing by the teacher is the best policy, I feel that you are overreacting. It would be enough to explain your kid that sometimes disagreements happen, and that although the teacher didn't act in this situation in a way you (and him) like, she still needs to be respected. I would also mention to your kid what was wrong with ...


8

What kind of homework is it? Any kind of homework, or is it math? What you wrote reminded me of this blog: http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/2013/04/25/were-all-bad-at-math-1-i-feel-stupid-too/ - the frustration, the procrastination, the excuses, the avoidance... though this doesn't have to be restricted to math, math is just a very typical example. Changing ...


8

It's a difficult problem because you can lead a horse to water, but can't make him drink. Every child is different, but we've found the following to help our son: Give him what he wants, but put conditions on it. We have a quiet, distraction-free area upstairs for our son to do school work, but he really hates being alone. We let him stay downstairs with ...


8

By any chance do you normally praise him for being smart when he succeeds at something? http://www.parentingscience.com/praise-and-intelligence.html http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-secret-to-raising-smart-kids1/ In my opinion the 2 articles above go a little beyond what the evidence supports in their claims but certain types of praise can ...


8

Your kid has a better handwriting than I and many fellow software engineers I know. Furthermore, the instructions are unnecessarily terse and hard to decipher. Not to mention the abysmal handwriting on the instructor's part. I'm a 28 year old native speaker and I can't, for the life of me, figure out what "Write the numerals on own" is even supposed to ...


8

Two things first: There are things one needs to do, even if one hates it. I do not like documentation, but I need to write documentation for my code, so that others can use it/maintain it. This is a good work ethic to develop. Emphasize on this. Writing is a very important skill irrespective of what they do. Proper completion of school work is essential. It ...


8

my attitude is learning can't be forced, or forced learning is something else but not learning. Hmm. I think most teachers would disagree with you. Most of my Latin students weren't taking Latin because they wanted to. They were taking Latin because their parents thought it would be good for them in some way (college admission/other.) How many kids ...


7

I think your concerns are valid, but you're projecting a bit of your own feelings onto your children's experiences. While they may make it clear they do not enjoy doing homework, their reasons for feeling this way may be completely different than your own. So your attempts to address what you think are their blocks are actually trying to address what yours ...


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