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190

What's wrong with Dr Seuss he asked? To find an answer, I've been tasked. His books on cats are widely read, In libraries, schools, or just in bed. Is it because he writes such blubber that turns a child's tongue into rubber? Nonsense words and silly rhymes Confusing children at bedtimes. Or maybe it's the politics Of chicks on blocks and clocks on bricks? ...


110

There are lots of things you can do: Don't make it a chore. She loves reading so foster that, don't kill it. Keep reading to her. As you do, trace your finger along the words so she can begin to relate specific spoken words to their written counterpart. Start teaching what sounds individual letters make. Point out letters that go together to make ...


71

First, to make them enjoy books: Read to your children Without competition the most important aspect. Your kids enjoy spending time with you, so they'll love when you read to them. Make sure you read to them every day. Include it in the bedtime routine, but also read to them in the daytime, when the ambition isn't for them to fall asleep, but to listen to ...


61

Since you're not thrilled about the depiction of violence in the book, but are reluctant to have your child singled out as different, maybe you could read it with him and discuss the violence and brutality. Use this as a teaching situation, where you can listen to his interpretation of the violent themes in the book and add in your own two cents.


58

Personally, I always saw them as actually helping the development of speech and language, in the same way practicing tongue twisters helps you improve. I have never heard of them being disliked or hated, and in fact a google search for any papers calling their usefulness into question returns nothing! That's just my opinion though. Wikipedia has this ...


56

So it looks like you have two questions, how to foster a love of reading and how to get your son to start reading more reading-level appropriate books (that phrasing was chosen carefully, I'll get to that in a moment). As far as fostering a love of reading goes, it sounds to me like your son already has that. If he enjoys reading, no matter the book, that ...


42

Don’t worry. I have 3 kids who are now fluent in 3 languages... When the youngest was learning to count we were giving her the numbers in either of two languages - because she was also at nursery where she only got one language. One day she was asked to count so she did in French. Then her brother asked her to count in English - she did and then it seemed ...


35

Speaking from experience1, your child is advanced, very likely gifted - but it happens. Remember that “normal” is just a statistical distribution and doesn’t imply any value or sense of wrong or right. (You may need that image in a few years down the road when your child wonders why he’s “not normal”.) I am very sure that while your support and encouragement ...


33

I have personally tried this. The only difficulty that I've found is that once your child reaches "reading age", these books can offer some starting points. However, if your child has consistently heard you say "chat" on a specific page, but the letters written are "cat", it'll pose a hurdle. Incidentally, I also initially did this with all the books that ...


32

You might consider that children are affected by violence differently than adults, especially violence in books. Their imagination isn't as horrible as ours. A lot of what makes the book impactful to adults will go right over a child's head, due to their inexperience and lack of maturity. If you've ever reread a book as an adult that you first read as a ...


29

YouTube comments, phone auto-correct, someone looking over your shoulder ... all of these could definitely annoy someone. Think of how you would feel if someone did it to you. Don't treat this child differently because you feel they are still in a stage of "learning". Unless specifically asking about or being quizzed on the spelling of something, it's ...


26

Your son sounds like my son! A few years ago I went through the same struggle. Bright kid, reading way above grade level, but spends all of his time reading Dogman and Captain Underpants. Tried a bunch of books that I loved, brick wall. He'd read a page or two and then back to the Captain. By now, he reads "text" books all the time. Not ...


26

First off, I'd recommend you change your language some. "How do I make my kids..." never ends well. Your kids are their own people, and they'll choose to like, or not like, things; trying to "make them" like things is a fool's errand that will more often than not make them dislike that thing. However, I've been where you are. I wanted ...


26

In our experience, the main reading-promoting activities at this early age were limited to reading aloud to children. We used good quality books with lots of pictures, often board books. Having the parent engaged in reading is important, so we always had a good supply of children's books that were also interesting to adults. At its best, reading to children ...


25

I'm a french guy who was reading at age 3. My father used the "méthode boscher", and it succeeded incredibly: I can vouch for it and the feasability. My son is currently learning to read (age 6) with a method called "lecture globale" where one learns to recognize the shape of a word. It feels like a bit of a gamble, since he approximates lots of words at ...


19

There are several potential advantages: Literacy: Being functionally literate is practically a requirement for modern life, and the greater your comfort with the written word, the easier it is to acquire knowledge. Reading to your child encourages them to think of books as "normal" things, and starts this process early. Entertainment: One of the key things ...


18

I'm not sure why the grandmothers would find them to be distasteful--You would probably be better off asking them directly for that. I do, however, discourage my own child's grandmothers from reading Dr. Seuss to my child. The reason has nothing to do with speech development or mental acuity, but because I find a number of the Doctor's characters to be poor ...


17

(Warning: Spoilers) Whereas the Hunger Games is a violent book, it is probably one of the few that shows the consequences of that violence. The death of Rue, the moral dilemma of kill-or-be-killed and the sacrifice of Katniss taking her sister's place all offer something for a child to learn. Even the death of foxface (I forget the character's name) was a ...


16

Very, very carefully. Seriously, one of the easiest ways of offending friends is criticizing the way they raise their children, even if you mean well. I'm sure that you have only the best intentions for these children, but so do they. Or at least I hope so. Being a parent is challenging in more ways that I would ever had though possible before I had my ...


15

I remember reading Lord of the Rings when I was 11. It opened my eyes to a whole world of wonderful literature that was genuinely interesting. Books with war and violence evoke strong emotions. While I agree that not every child is necessarily ready for dealing with those emotions at that age, I would say that it's up to parents and teachers to support ...


15

A Tale of Two Children I have two boys, both grown now, but they were very different. We read to them every night, multiple books, and they both loved being read to. However, when the older one came to reading age he simply wasn't interested at all. We sat with him incessantly, reading with him, taking him to the library, doing everything we could. In ...


14

There's a developmental stage called phonemic awareness that's a precursor to reading. It's a recognition that words are made of separate sounds, and a skill in manipulating those individual sounds. Some kids develop it very early, but others don't. You can test it with your daughter by asking questions like, "If you have 'pat' and take away the 'puh' and ...


14

I have not ever heard of any research suggesting there is "too much," however there are some sensible guidelines that could give you a practical upper limit: when your child gets tired, don't force them when they get bored, try different books, but sometimes they will just not want you to read sometimes you'll need to do other things. In the early years ...


13

From personal experience: I started reading at 3. I was 4 when I read a book on my own for the first time (Winnie the Pooh - the original, not some dumbed down Disney version). So to the "is it feasible" question - yes, it is. But something you need to consider: there will be plateaus. This is usual for any human learning curve for any skill, but they ...


13

when to start reading books to a child As soon as it's fun for everyone involved. 11 months is fine if you and your daughter enjoy it. and attempt teaching reading? Too early. At 11 month you should focus mainly on spoken word. Don't make it a chore or something with a learning goal. Cuddle, tickle, talk, look at pictures, play around with words, be silly....


12

Obviously, the first decision is to determine if the individual child is ready or not for the book in any one form of reading it - alone, with a teacher and class, and/or with a parent. That really is a personal and individual decision as the answer for any given child will depend upon that child's particular sensitivities, reading abilities and moral ...


12

You may not get a choice, particularly as your child gets older. Mine has lots of books in both English and her mother tongue. When I pick up a book she will often request demand it be read in one language or the other, regardless of what language it's written in. This is fine for picture books, but becomes more challenging with more advanced texts. I can ...


12

Like Ian, I would also urge you to think of how you would feel in the kid's place. Personally, I would be really annoyed and embarrassed if it turns out someone has been letting me make mistakes without telling me! This may well be colored by my experience living in countries where I didn't speak the local language natively, but I always appreciate it when ...


11

I think that comprehension doesn't come until reading is more effortless for the child. Early on, they're expending all their effort just reading letters and figuring out the words. As a point of reference, I noticed that my oldest daughter seemed to have very poor comprehension through Kindergarten and first grade. It seemed that in second grade the ...


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