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175

What's wrong with Dr Seuss he asked? To find an answer, I've been tasked. His books on cats are widely read, In libraries, schools, or just in bed. Is it because he writes such blubber that turns a child's tongue into rubber? Nonsense words and silly rhymes Confusing children at bedtimes. Or maybe it's the politics Of chicks on blocks and clocks on bricks? ...


110

There are lots of things you can do: Don't make it a chore. She loves reading so foster that, don't kill it. Keep reading to her. As you do, trace your finger along the words so she can begin to relate specific spoken words to their written counterpart. Start teaching what sounds individual letters make. Point out letters that go together to make ...


61

Since you're not thrilled about the depiction of violence in the book, but are reluctant to have your child singled out as different, maybe you could read it with him and discuss the violence and brutality. Use this as a teaching situation, where you can listen to his interpretation of the violent themes in the book and add in your own two cents.


56

Personally, I always saw them as actually helping the development of speech and language, in the same way practicing tongue twisters helps you improve. I have never heard of them being disliked or hated, and in fact a google search for any papers calling their usefulness into question returns nothing! That's just my opinion though. Wikipedia has this ...


32

You might consider that children are affected by violence differently than adults, especially violence in books. Their imagination isn't as horrible as ours. A lot of what makes the book impactful to adults will go right over a child's head, due to their inexperience and lack of maturity. If you've ever reread a book as an adult that you first read as a ...


32

I have personally tried this. The only difficulty that I've found is that once your child reaches "reading age", these books can offer some starting points. However, if your child has consistently heard you say "chat" on a specific page, but the letters written are "cat", it'll pose a hurdle. Incidentally, I also initially did this with all the books that ...


25

I'm a french guy who was reading at age 3. My father used the "méthode boscher", and it succeeded incredibly: I can vouch for it and the feasability. My son is currently learning to read (age 6) with a method called "lecture globale" where one learns to recognize the shape of a word. It feels like a bit of a gamble, since he approximates lots of words at ...


19

Your little guy will be back for more stories, don't worry, he's just exercising his independence a bit. My son is 3 and adores books, although less so now than a year ago, and he likes to flip through books on his own and act like he's reading them. I encourage that wholeheartedly, even though he can't read he is interpreting the story himself, making his ...


19

There are several potential advantages: Literacy: Being functionally literate is practically a requirement for modern life, and the greater your comfort with the written word, the easier it is to acquire knowledge. Reading to your child encourages them to think of books as "normal" things, and starts this process early. Entertainment: One of the key things ...


17

Whilst it helps to start early, it's never too late to start a habit :) I also have a very active toddler and the following helps: establish a routine: for example I read to my kids for about 10 minutes just before bedtime, every single day. They know it and expect it (big drama if we try to skip it) get him to pick the book he wants: at read-time, i ask ...


16

(Warning: Spoilers) Whereas the Hunger Games is a violent book, it is probably one of the few that shows the consequences of that violence. The death of Rue, the moral dilemma of kill-or-be-killed and the sacrifice of Katniss taking her sister's place all offer something for a child to learn. Even the death of foxface (I forget the character's name) was a ...


16

I'm not sure why the grandmothers would find them to be distasteful--You would probably be better off asking them directly for that. I do, however, discourage my own child's grandmothers from reading Dr. Seuss to my child. The reason has nothing to do with speech development or mental acuity, but because I find a number of the Doctor's characters to be poor ...


16

Very, very carefully. Seriously, one of the easiest ways of offending friends is criticizing the way they raise their children, even if you mean well. I'm sure that you have only the best intentions for these children, but so do they. Or at least I hope so. Being a parent is challenging in more ways that I would ever had though possible before I had my ...


15

I remember reading Lord of the Rings when I was 11. It opened my eyes to a whole world of wonderful literature that was genuinely interesting. Books with war and violence evoke strong emotions. While I agree that not every child is necessarily ready for dealing with those emotions at that age, I would say that it's up to parents and teachers to support ...


14

There's a developmental stage called phonemic awareness that's a precursor to reading. It's a recognition that words are made of separate sounds, and a skill in manipulating those individual sounds. Some kids develop it very early, but others don't. You can test it with your daughter by asking questions like, "If you have 'pat' and take away the 'puh' and ...


14

I have not ever heard of any research suggesting there is "too much," however there are some sensible guidelines that could give you a practical upper limit: when your child gets tired, don't force them when they get bored, try different books, but sometimes they will just not want you to read sometimes you'll need to do other things. In the early years ...


13

From personal experience: I started reading at 3. I was 4 when I read a book on my own for the first time (Winnie the Pooh - the original, not some dumbed down Disney version). So to the "is it feasible" question - yes, it is. But something you need to consider: there will be plateaus. This is usual for any human learning curve for any skill, but they ...


12

Obviously, the first decision is to determine if the individual child is ready or not for the book in any one form of reading it - alone, with a teacher and class, and/or with a parent. That really is a personal and individual decision as the answer for any given child will depend upon that child's particular sensitivities, reading abilities and moral ...


12

You may not get a choice, particularly as your child gets older. Mine has lots of books in both English and her mother tongue. When I pick up a book she will often request demand it be read in one language or the other, regardless of what language it's written in. This is fine for picture books, but becomes more challenging with more advanced texts. I can ...


11

I think that comprehension doesn't come until reading is more effortless for the child. Early on, they're expending all their effort just reading letters and figuring out the words. As a point of reference, I noticed that my oldest daughter seemed to have very poor comprehension through Kindergarten and first grade. It seemed that in second grade the ...


11

I actually had a similar question a couple years ago. What I've learned since then is you mostly just need to wait. Kids don't really hit the developmental milestones for fluent reading until around age 7 or 8. Schools are teaching it earlier now mostly due to political pressure, not due to that being the best timetable for the way kids naturally learn. ...


10

Don't worry too much. He is demonstrating how much he likes to read by wanting to do it himself. You can help him by giving him some basic tools to start working it out on his own. This will make his time "reading" more productive as he learns to recognize the important parts of text. Show him where the words are on the page. Point to the words as you ...


10

When she runs into words that confuse her, just say the correct word quietly and in a neutral way. She needn't stop, but it's best that you get the sense that she registered the meaning even if it's just the tiniest pause that demonstrates it. As you go along, you will become better at knowing when she wants to work out a word on her own, but my experience ...


10

You are trying to give your son 2 boring options and hope that the boring option which requires more effort to be bored will win out. Honestly, I don't see that happening. If you want to instill a love of reading, give him something he'll love to read. I love reading, but only when it's something I'm interested in. I remember reading a book once that was ...


9

This may not be the most scholarly article devoted to the subject, but it has been borne out again and again in well-developed studies: reading to your child id one of the most beneficial activities one can do with children after the obvious basics (food/shelter/love). Above and beyond the child gaining confidence that she matters to you (because of the ...


8

Let him learn that when he damages a book, he's left with a damaged book. Taking it away from him shows him that you don't want them damaged; whereas leaving it with him shows him why he shouldn't want that. If he gets upset, show him how to fix the book (another valuable lesson), but the easiest way, possibly the only way to really teach someone to care ...


8

It is true that most children have letter identification down by 5 years of age, and some know basic sight words and the sounds letters make. Sounding out words can be helpful, and I think it is probably what most parents remember about learning how to read, but it comes after some other important steps. When we learn to read, we learn how to decode text....


8

I asked a friend of mine who is a literacy education professor this same question. (My son just started kindergarten and tested in the middle of second grade for reading, and is moving up rapidly.) She offered this professional advice: Congratulations! What it amounts to is that your son already has strong skills for decoding text and has many strategies ...


8

In addition to the literacy, entertainment, bonding, and language, I would add: values. Whether you read stories that actively tell stories of your religion and culture, or just ones that have the same "backstory", the books you read help to centre your child in your values. To use a North American example, if you read a story where one of the actions in ...


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