79

This book works differently for people at different stages of their lives. The lesson for young children reading this book, I believe, is about unconditional love. Children need to know and trust that their parents will always be there for them, loving them without question, even if they need them their whole lives. You could say to your young child, "I'm ...


53

Of all your suggestions, only one really says “it’s not ok to kick the dinosaurs”. The other are sending a different message, which can be summed up as Don’t do it when [some else with more power] sees it, because there may be undesirable consequences. The logical next step for some clever kids is to do exactly what you don’t want them to do the moment ...


50

Am I the only person who thinks that it's entirely trivial for the next person to use the toilet to correct the seat position for their needs? I don't see why this is worth complaining about. Just teach your kids to make sure the seat is where they need it to be so that they can do what they need to do, and leave it at that. The whole "men must be the ...


47

Rest assured that science and religion are not neccessarily a contradiction. Some of the best scientists of past and present time were deeply religious - and came from different religious backgrounds. As one commenter wrote, Georges Lemaître being one relatively modern example. The question of how to connect religious beliefs and teachings and scientific ...


38

My personal opinion is that there are no sites I would consider appropriately curated. This is something you should watch with them, discuss with them, and if needed, change channel. I don't know of any unbiased news channels, either on television, or via the internet (so your comment about not allowing TV news but allowing tablets doesn't really help you)...


35

Speaking from experience1, your child is advanced, very likely gifted - but it happens. Remember that “normal” is just a statistical distribution and doesn’t imply any value or sense of wrong or right. (You may need that image in a few years down the road when your child wonders why he’s “not normal”.) I am very sure that while your support and encouragement ...


30

I would try modeling the behavior you would like to see in her. I suspect you are correct in your assumption that she learned her current behavior from observing you. Which means you will probably have success by modeling helpful behavior. So when you ask her to pass you a napkin and she responds with "o self", ask your wife if she will pass you a napkin. ...


27

Most parents try to do it that way when they can. The main thing you're missing is that children live in the moment, to a much larger degree than most adults realize until they have kids of their own. The further removed the consequence is from the decision, the less influence it has on their next decision. For your bedtime example, it would take a ...


27

Something that hasn't been addressed is why the child is kicking the dinosaur. They are bored with the park or this exhibit ("Hey, don't damage the exhibits. If you're bored let's go and see the XYZ.") They are imagining fighting a dinosaur (Acknowledge the story. Compliment their bravery etc. Engage the imagination by talking about fighting a ...


26

It's a common issue at around that age, both ours had issues with '6' for some reason and skipped from 5 to 7 and the younger one later got stuck with '13' for a short while. The best thing to do is practice with them and they will get there. Practicing counting as a song / rhyme (like 1-2 buckle my shoe) is one good way to help them to remember the ...


26

In our experience, the main reading-promoting activities at this early age were limited to reading aloud to children. We used good quality books with lots of pictures, often board books. Having the parent engaged in reading is important, so we always had a good supply of children's books that were also interesting to adults. At its best, reading to children ...


25

This is very dependent on the child, as are all questions of this sort, but 5-6 is certainly possible. My children, now eight and nine, were first exposed to programming in a meaningful way at around the age of 4-5. We started with simple games that are "programming lite", which basically involve the child creating a "program" either to ...


22

I personally don't think that science is inimical to faith and faith-based values. It can be a magnificent way to explore the intricacies of creation. You're probably versed in Ancient Near Eastern culture. There is nothing deceitful about a God who communicates with His people in a way they can understand, and in the ANE, that was through stories. ...


22

I'm a fan of building up a programming mindset without even needing to use a computer. One good example is the peanut-butter sandwich game. You pretend to be a robot, while the child gives you instructions which you execute with painstakingly literal precision. Child: Put the peanut butter on the bread. Parent: [puts the unopened peanut butter jar onto ...


21

Just to add to what other posters have said, this can be a good time to give a child a lesson in empathy as well. Something like "Well, that dinosaur belongs to someone. Would you like it if someone kicked your <favourite toy, games console, etc>?". They would most likely say no, so then the obvious next question is "Why not?"


20

As a person with ADD, I can tell you what helps with me. Post-it notes! Put a post-it note or a bright colored sheet on the wall reminding everyone (don't single him out) to "Please close the toilet seat when you have finished your business". Bright colors! I use neon yellow post-its to remind me of things I have to do consistently.


20

To agree with several of the above non-answers, and actually answer the question, as posted: the healthiest, smartest, most sensical means of teaching him to either not raise the toilet seat or to at least return it to closed would be ...to be a good example. For the several reasons already mentioned about gender roles, health, toddler safety, etc, just ...


20

The more people know about computers the later they appear to let their kids near them. This Business Insider article has a few observations and quotes: Gates, for example, didn't let his kids use cellphones until they were 14. Jobs, the inventor of the iPad, prohibited his own kids from using the tech. To safeguard their kids, tech worker parents often ...


19

I feel for you, I had a bad relationship with my father for a long time. Fortunately we managed to patch it up but that's not always in the cards. I wouldn't sugar coat too much or lie to your child. He's asking a fair question and it deserves an answer. Life doesn't always work out how we want and he's going to have to learn that sometime. That doesn't ...


19

One of our jobs as parents is teaching; using the internet to help with this task is fine, but before you do, teach them how to be safe when they're online. Teach your kids about online safety (posting/chatting in threads or forums, responding to contact requests, how to safely use passwords, keeping personal information safe and secure). It's never too ...


19

If you're aware of the mistakes, and conscious of when you make them, that's a big step already. The next step is to develop alternatives, and have them ready, so that as soon as you recognize a behaviour that you don't want to be doing, you pull out the alternative. Let's say your parents always smacked you on the cheek when you did something wrong. ...


19

3.5 is on the young end to learn to ride a bike, but not impossible certainly. The challenge a 3.5 year old will have is pedaling strength; you can help a lot here by having a lighter bike (most of the "Walmart specials" that 3.5 year olds tend to get are made from very heavy materials, not many people want to spend $200+ on a bike for a kid to ...


18

Before the days of the internet, parents tended to have a kind of God-like image in their child's mind and would be trusted to provide the right answers on a range of random topics that the child would be curious about. I often wonder how this works now with answers and information that is so easily accessible to everyone. I think part of the answer to ...


18

Quietly and politely, tell the child to please not kick the dino and give the best possible (age-appropriate) reason. Something like "Please don't kick the dino. The dinos in the park are not for kicking. If other kids start kicking them, the dinos will fall apart and then next time we come to the park, there will be nothing to play with." ...


17

Do children homeschooled by those without professional teacher training or specific teaching qualifications have worse outcomes in life than those schooled by professional, trained, and qualified teachers, as found in public education? ... I'm specifically interested in research or studies show or demonstrate this. Studies cost money, usually supplied ...


16

WWooowww... Mirror image of my own situation, see my post. I have no answer, but I have suggestions. I came to the conclusion that puberty, social trailblazing and the change in the properties of school all kind of combined to make this kind of "what the hell is going on in my life!" soup for my daughter. The thing that seems to have worked to a point ...


16

The lesson in The Giving Tree is not from the tree's point of view. It is from the boy's. The reader will more immediately identify with the boy, after all (if a child, in particular) - and so the lesson is to be aware of people giving to you, and be grateful for it, rather than continually demanding. The boy doesn't feel happy, after all, until the end - ...


16

My son is 8, and I haven't taught him to use google yet, despite him having his own computer, but I have shown him many times. My main reason is that getting a good result on a general search engine is a relatively difficult skill. Getting a result on an appropriate level for an 8 year-old is even more difficult, especially on topics that schools typically ...


14

18 months isn't an age to be worried about "teaching" so much; it's an age to be giving interesting experiences and allowing him to grow into his own. Take him outside, let him play on the playground regularly. Take him out to see other kids. Talk to other adults around him, so he can learn words from you. Keep the TV off - entirely if necessary. Read ...


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