85

The center position is the safest for a car seat. Not only is that somewhat logical (regardless of what side the car is impacted, there's distance between impact and child), but it is supported by research. That same study also indicates there was no statistically significant difference in the injury risk between the two sides of the car, only between the ...


19

Although this is somewhat opinion-based as there are both minivans and SUVs which fit the bill, the advantages of the minivan over the SUV are: they are purpose built people carriers so they have features like sliding doors and removable and re-configurable seats that SUVs don't have, or at least not to the same level they are generally cheaper to own, ...


14

There really is no substitute for taking the entire family, including rear-facing car seat, for test drives. Go to a crowded parking lot, park with cars on both sides, then get everyone out and back in. Think about groceries. Think about vacations. Think about if a friend or relative comes with you. Try all the seats yourself, because your 12 year-old ...


12

First off, this is not medical or legal advice, and no answer from a site like this should be relied upon; ask your pediatrician for the best advice. It is never safer for a child to sit in the front seat. (Similarly, it is never safer for an adult; the rear seat is simply safer in general.) The recommendations of child safety organizations are generally ...


10

I did some research into this years ago which I can't easily get to right now. I think I used the CDC statistics. What I found was that the position behind the driver's seat was slightly less safe because turns towards the drivers side cross traffic, whereas turns away from the driver's side don't cross as much traffic - but both types of turns, if ...


9

These seats are designed to be newborn-friendly. Any of them causing any physical damage to a child is unthinkable. Such seat should never have been made and accepted for sale. Unless you bought the cheapest seat on a flea market, you're going to be ok. Long trips are discouraged because your child is restricted to the same position for their duration. If a ...


8

Nope. If you would be more comfortable keeping an eye on them, there are mirrors you can install that allow you to see them in your rear view mirror. However, you will be wise to watch the road instead of the sleeping babies in the back seat; every newborn I've ever met just sleeps in the car so you won't be missing much.


8

This is a problem we faced for a time with my now three year old; not exactly the same (we had a problem with him getting out of the harness/unbuckling it rather than loosening it), but works out to the same thing. By two and a half or so he was capable of both unbuckling himself and buckling himself. (This is with a new-when-he-was-1 Evenflo carseat that'...


7

We had both an Odyssey and a Pilot at the same time. I have to say, the Pilot was my dream car, but the back seat was only functional, i.e. not comfortable for long trips. Also, less room for said long trips. But the 4WD in the winter, the towing capacity, the visibility, etc., are a lovely memory. The Odyssey was a much more comfortable car to travel ...


6

New research warns that infants under four weeks shouldn't travel in car seats for more than 30 minutes. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-37947841


6

The minivan, in my opinion (Joe), is the way to go. I agree it is not the sporty vehicle we aspire to drive but when it comes to hauling (four) kids around, it is the easiest, most convenient, comfortable way to go. I recommend the Toyota Sienna with seating for 8. It has three removable seats in the middle so you can remove any of them for the ease of ...


6

Without seeing it's hard to say anything for sure, but based on how every car seat I have encountered is constructed I am inclined to ask whether your boy's belt straps are sufficiently tight. For his head to be that far back the seat would either need to Not have sufficient padding/bracing behind his head, which is a problem in and of itself Be letting ...


6

First: make sure you have the belt sufficiently tight. A tight enough 5-point carseat belt should not allow the child to remove his arms. Tight enough means you can get two fingers under it but not more than that. It's probably a lot tighter than you think it should be - and definitely will be tight for him. Second: talk to your child. Two is old enough ...


6

I sympathise with you. Our 1-year-old managed to slip out of her 5-point harness somehow the other week. There are after market products designed to prevent children from tampering with the mechanisms of various seat designs, but they are controversial and I personally would not buy them for the following reasons: They almost certainly have not been ...


5

Ericas answer hits the nail on the head regarding accidents. An additional concern is forgetting baby in the car. Add to all of that the fact that many of the children forgotten in cars are neither heard nor seen. Most of them have fallen asleep and are situated behind the driver in rear-facing car seats. Baby forgotten in the car While this is not ...


5

Am I being an overly anxious new parent or would I be justified in telling the new grandparents they need to come to us for the Holidays this year or just not see us this year? I'm a new dad to a newborn and every baby is different, but my son HATES the car seat. It doesn't matter if the car is moving, his favorite music is playing, he's well fed, and he's ...


5

I have a new motto for you. "Does (baby) care?" Should I stay late at work so my boss likes me better? No. Because baby doesn't care. You now make every decision with this motto. What's easier? For old people to drive 4 hours or for you to soothe a baby who just pooped all over herself and the car seat? I've said this to my parents. "There will come a ...


5

As it turns out, the rear latches / hooks have a red release button on the front of the seat. Pushing and holding the release button up while simultaneously pulling the latches from the rear of the seat allows them to be adjusted. No idea why that's not in the manual :/ As seen here: https://youtu.be/zfu6lME6gb0?t=196


4

The AA says: Extreme hazard warning You must not use a rear-facing child seat on a passenger seat where an active passenger airbag is fitted. The child's head will be too close to the airbag and severe injury or death could result if the bag is triggered. For forward facing child restraints it is acceptable to leave the airbag active and move the car's seat ...


4

With car seats for younger children (infants or toddlers), there are straps which hold the child into the car seat and then an additional system to secure the seat to the car. This used to be with a regular seat belt, but in modern vehicles is more commonly with LATCH. (Having once fed a seat belt through a toddler seat in a car without LATCH, it's quite ...


4

First of all, most babies love to travel. They sleep well in a baby carseat (assuming you have a safe and comfy one). It is recommended not to have your baby in a car seat for more than two hours a day. A baby has to change position regularly to develop good motor skills. But as you already mentioned, this trip you won't make everyday. So don't be afraid to ...


3

A one year old is too old for a carrying car seat, or will soon be. Most of those max out at 30 inches or less; in the US, a boy will reach 30 inches on average on his first birthday, with a 95% range of 8 months to 16 months, and a girl not too different from that, according to the CDC Growth Charts. We're talking about a sitting-up carseat here. The ...


3

The major reason not to travel with a newborn (< 3 month old) is not so much the carseat, but the immune system. A baby under three months old does not have a very well developed immune system, and so traveling to another location (particularly to be around new people) increases the risks that he/she catch an infection which is potentially much more ...


3

This seat should not be used - Period. Car seats are designed to do two things, restrain the occupant by not deforming and absorb/transfer energy by deforming in a controlled way. This seat is structurally compromised and will not perform correctly under load. The area below the break will not deform correctly and will absorb less energy than designed (...


3

I looked the model up and it said to contact them at this # and they will send you one in the mail. 1-800-544-1108


3

Family is in same dilemma we have a Traverse which is nice but with 4 kids cargo space is tight in the car and hard to have friends ride with kids. We are now looking at the Odyssey and Siena due to 8 passenger configuration, wish the T&C had 8 seats. Wife is now coming around that the mini-van might be more practical due to extra space and room for ...


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