Hot answers tagged

19

Do not insist that your child eats a certain amount of solid food, or of anything else. The child will eat as much as they need. Keep offering your child solid food, but do not try to convince her to eat it. Have family meals. The child learns good eating habits from imitating the family members. Children learn by copying, and it helps if adults are eating ...


15

The American Academy of Pediatrics no longer recommends avoiding citrus fruit explicitly; see this resource for more detail as to what they do recommend. (Largely, any food.) The primary concerns now are honey (botulism) and nitrates in food (spinach, beets, green beans, squash, and carrots are specifically called out as potentially containing higher ...


7

You mentioned the spoon, but does she eat without it? My youngest (now 10 months old) never liked to be spoon fed. She'd allow it but much preferred to feed herself. This obviously depends on the dexterity of your baby's fingers, but if she can do it herself you may have better luck. Mine loves puffs, tiny pieces of turkey (her favorite), ham, cheese, ...


5

When my girl was a baby, berries were on the "avoid" list because at the time, there were fears that early exposure would lead to allergies. More recent thought on the matter though, is that a lack of exposures might contribute to allergies so strawberries have actually been removed from the "no no list" and because they are so nutritious added back into ...


4

@balanced mama's answer covers everything I was going say, but, I would add that any time you add a new food, you should aim for the purest form of the food. As in, it should be by itself, or, at least have very few other ingredients. Strawberry Yogurt melts typically have several ingredients, many of them processed, and so IF your baby has a reaction to it, ...


4

Constipation in infants starting solid foods is not uncommon, and may not, in fact, be constipation. If your child is not uncomfortable (no obvious abdominal pain, crying, arching his back, attempting to pass stool without success), and is passing soft stool without difficulty every 5 days or so, it's fine. If, on the other hand, any of the above are ...


4

You can introduce citrus fruit to your baby after 6 months of age. But make sure that citrus fruits are prepared carefully - remove the peel, seeds and the membrane as they are difficult to chew and may cause a baby to gag or choke. Always cut the fruit into bite-size pieces so that baby can chew food well. After introducing any new food, wait at least for ...


4

He may just not be ready. It takes a lot of muscles and coordination to swallow, especially if you have to get the stuff from the front of your mouth to the back, and kids learn how at different ages. At 7 months, I don't think there's anything to worry about. I'd start meals with breastmilk or formula, then offer solid or semi-solid foods, and then wrap up ...


4

It's time to get rid of the bottle. I had a similar situation - not as bad - with my daughter. She had an attachment to her bottle also and eventually we told her it was time to let them go. Everything was done together so she knew exactly what was happening, almost like a ritual. We washed the bottles one more time, wrapped them up in newspaper to preserve ...


3

I really think you are overthinking this. There are millions of people who have grown up healthy without ever having a drop of breast milk. Because of medical issues, my first son did not breastfeed at all and my second son drank both breast milk and formula, until he hit about 9 months and decided to bite me because my breast wouldn't stretch enough for him ...


3

I strongly suggest that you reverse the feeding order: What motivation is there to struggle with something new (many babies are hesitant to try new tastes or textures), if she's already (semi-)full? In general, following Ellyn Sattler's "Division of Responsibility" is a viable approach, meaning at your stage you offer the food you deem appropriate, she ...


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

Almost certainly, since children at that age change their preferences constantly. My son has been running hot and cold on (eg.) avocados ever since he started eating solids: sometimes they're the best thing in the world, but -- usually after eating them often for a while -- he seems to get bored and refuses to touch them. We pause for a while, try again ...


3

I remember being sick worried thinking why my lo wasn't eating at that age, but that was just a phase. We used to think he was the only child who doesn't like to eat, but after talking to friends and reading online, I found out many babies go through the same stage at that age. Other things I tried at the time and they worked were, change the timings of ...


3

One word: bananas. There are many different reasons why your baby will refuse solids at those ages - sometimes it is simply uncomfortable for them, it may be "false teething" (not sure if this is a thing with an actual name, but some kids show symptoms like teething months before teething starts), it could be strong tastes (did you change the way ...


2

The only thing I'd add is that yogurt is great for kids, yogurt melts less so because they are usually very sweet. Why are you wanting to give these? If it's because they're good for teething, I'd say that is okay, although odds are you can come up with something better - plain crushed or smaller cube ice is excellent, for example, or any of several (...


2

If by "local rash" you mean a red patch on the chin or something, odds are very high it's got nothing to do with the foods you are feeding him, particularly if it's something like rice that virtually nobody is allergic to. Most babies start drooling at the same age as they start eating solids (in fact, it's considered a sign of readiness), and most often it'...


2

My boy has gone a few days without pooing once or twice in his 8 months of life. I think up to 4 days at most. We've asked doctors about it, and they say it's not unusual, and everything should be fine as long as they are still passing liquids regularly. If you think about it for a moment, look at how fast your baby is growing, that size is coming from ...


2

Stephie is right, reverse the feeding order. Hunger is powerful. Keep the pouch and other favored items out of sight and start with the more solid stuff first. To be honest I wouldn't worry about it too much, but if you want to play hardball, make it seem like there's nothing else. Make feeding time over, and come back to it in 10mins. (10min is an ...


1

Can we just increase her solid intake in place of breast milk? There should be no problems doing this. While it's true that breast milk is best for babies, the benefit declines as the baby gets older. The official WHO recommendation is exclusive breastfeeding for six months: On a population basis, exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of ...


1

As nobody posted a definitive answer on this, I'd like to share my own experience at this point, two months after posing the question. Warning: this post includes images of actual baby stool! If I recall correctly, my daughter's stool began to change only about 3 weeks ago, so about 5 weeks after I posted the question. We have been feeding her pieces of ...


1

You might not like my answer, no-one does, but it works! instead of asking her to eat "offer" her to eat, put some great food around her, keep it there all the time, and let her worry about her hunger herself... I would put food on the table, if it's something new I would say aloud, "it's delicious, would you like some?", she: "no", me: "oh! who cares! ...


1

I transitioned my son off "baby foods" by giving him the baby cereal mixed with vegitable beef soup (concentrate). He got a variety of (soft) vegitables with well cooked meat. If your daughter is full from solid foods, she is less likely to be dependant on milk. I would like to add, when she wakes and you think she only wants milk, she might really want to ...


1

You won't know for sure until it happens, unfortunately. It's probably worth pumping a bit more to start with. However, most likely the total amount won't change very much. The baby is still eating the same amount of milk, right? The presence of cereal doesn't change that (until it becomes enough to offset the milk needs, anyway). Normally, babies on ...


1

When we first started our children on semi-solids, my wife expressed some breast milk and mixed this in. It worked extremely well. It has a familiar taste then, so they know what to do with it.


1

Something I've always done with my little one is to say the word "Chew!" in between making over emphasised chewing motions with my mouth, and then "Swallow!" and making a big gulping swallow so he can see my neck moving. It often amuses him as if it's a bit of a game but does seem to work as it shows by example. Also it helps if he's choking a little bit ...


1

It sounds like she is ready for something more substantial/textural than just purees. With my son the nutrition specialist had us switch from purees to pastes, from pastes to disolvables, and then from disolvables to soft chewables. The specialist also said until a baby is on to chewables the progression is development based and nutrition should still come ...


1

In general: My first baby loved food. Spoon fed from 5 months, devoured anything. My second baby was not really interested in food until 11-12 months old. He is mostly interested when he can feed himself. In the end, babies are different, and start eating at different times, and there is no one 'right' approach. Not opening mouth: Does she maybe not ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

(Granted this question is 6 years old and so the kid has grown a lot since then, but for others): I would consult your pediatrician and/or an allergist. My baby had his first allergy reaction at only 7 months and we found some unusual things for him to be allergic to, including garlic. I would not feed him any of the things you think he might be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible