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26

My wife stopped breastfeeding when our daughter was 3. She did it by repeating often the whole month before she turned 3 that when she will be 3, she will be older, and that she will stop breastfeeding. Bigger childs don't drink breast milk, that's part of the growing-up process, at by the time our daughter was 3, she perfectly understood that. Actually, for ...


22

This is a normal, age appropriate behavior. He'll get better with time and practice. As scary as it is, gagging from over filling his mouth is how he learns about appropriate bite size and chewing. It was frequent experience when my child was that age, and still sometimes happens, although far less often as he got older, and is rare now at 3. For my son, ...


19

Do not insist that your child eats a certain amount of solid food, or of anything else. The child will eat as much as they need. Keep offering your child solid food, but do not try to convince her to eat it. Have family meals. The child learns good eating habits from imitating the family members. Children learn by copying, and it helps if adults are eating ...


18

For those of us not in USA, "peep" is marshmallow candy: Wikipedia article. I had to look it up. As one user comments, infants can't chew food so they either spit it out, swallow it whole -- or choke on it! For this reason, infants should not be given food they can't swallow. If the parent feels that the infant really needs to eat a peep, then cut it up ...


15

The American Academy of Pediatrics no longer recommends avoiding citrus fruit explicitly; see this resource for more detail as to what they do recommend. (Largely, any food.) The primary concerns now are honey (botulism) and nitrates in food (spinach, beets, green beans, squash, and carrots are specifically called out as potentially containing higher ...


12

It is probably not good practice to let your 4-month-old eat a marshmallow for more than simply the fact that it's a choking hazard. A Peep is a marshmallow which means it's mostly sugar, but also gelatin, various dyes (depending on which color of Peep she gave her child), dairy products, and preservatives. My best friend's mother buys Peeps every year, ...


8

I recall having dinner with some friends either shortly before or shortly after our first child was born. We must have appeared shocked at something they let their toddler get away with, although I don't recall what it was, because they jokingly commented about how much more protective parents are of their first child compared to their youngest. At the ...


7

You mentioned the spoon, but does she eat without it? My youngest (now 10 months old) never liked to be spoon fed. She'd allow it but much preferred to feed herself. This obviously depends on the dexterity of your baby's fingers, but if she can do it herself you may have better luck. Mine loves puffs, tiny pieces of turkey (her favorite), ham, cheese, ...


6

My wife just started the process. We had some problem to put my son to sleep: he would fall asleep only sucking, and wake up couple of times during night for milk. One day my wife was away and I had to put him to sleep alone... Took me 1 hour, so I decided we had to stop. It's been quite easy actually: the first night it took again a good hour and he cried ...


6

A wise woman once told me that weaning is a two-way process. Whenever it is not right for either one of the people involved (the woman or the baby/toddler), it is over. Some signs that it is not right for your infant or toddler any more: Your infant or toddler refuses to nurse when clearly hungry. Your infant or toddler prefers another (age-appropriate) ...


5

Try a warm compress on the knot for a few days, several times a day. She can also try to GENTLY massage the knot towards the nipple; if it's a blocked duct, the warm compress should loosen it up, and then she can massage it out of the nipple. If she presents with a fever or pain, or anything that seems like it could be an infection, make sure she heads to ...


5

He's going to eat enough, barring substantial physiological problems that it doesn't sound like apply here. This was true at one month old, is true now, and will be true at 3 or 4. Kids don't starve themselves, whatever their difficulties with appearing to eat a normal meal are. As long as you're not replacing those calories with candy or potato chips, so ...


5

Ideally babies shouldn't be eating anything other than milk much before they're six months old. This is because they don't have the motor skills yet to move food around in their mouths, and their gut hasn't matured enough to be able to digest other foods properly. There is some evidence that early introduction of solid food increases the chance of food ...


5

Most kids will eat fairly well and self manage if you set the right boundary conditions and stop making a fuss about it, which makes it into a an attention-grabbing power struggle. Things that can help are Routine & Consistency: set fixed meal times every day. Sit down with the family and do a little fun ritual (sing, clap, yodle, whatever) Make sure ...


4

I have good and bad news, this can be done, but it isn't quick or easy. top tips Make waking up in the night dull Keep it dark, a nightlight is good for this keep it quiet and calm, so only person I used the method called slow withdrawl here is a link explaining it https://www.netmums.com/baby/sleep-training-techniques---gradual-retreat The seven steps of ...


4

You can introduce citrus fruit to your baby after 6 months of age. But make sure that citrus fruits are prepared carefully - remove the peel, seeds and the membrane as they are difficult to chew and may cause a baby to gag or choke. Always cut the fruit into bite-size pieces so that baby can chew food well. After introducing any new food, wait at least for ...


4

I've been amazed at how much my 3 kids have learned by mirroring. Are you eating with your baby? It might help him to understand what he needs to do by seeing you eating face to face with him. Even possibly you could consider really exaggerating the chewing motion so he sees what to do. I wouldn't be surprised if he even started copying you without ...


3

What we did for a few days: I (the father) slept with the baby on a separate bed, with a water bottle ready. When he woke up, I cuddled him and gave him a bit to drink and he would sleep on. The idea is that when the baby smells the (still lactating!) mother, he/she gets hungry. As said, a few days broke the habit and weaning was relativly smooth. Of course,...


3

I strongly suggest that you reverse the feeding order: What motivation is there to struggle with something new (many babies are hesitant to try new tastes or textures), if she's already (semi-)full? In general, following Ellyn Sattler's "Division of Responsibility" is a viable approach, meaning at your stage you offer the food you deem appropriate, she ...


3

You've got it backwards. Introducing foods early reduces the chances of allergies. https://readysetfood.com/blogs/community/the-aap-s-new-guidelines-for-infant-food-allergy-prevention-what-families-need-to-know “In fact, parents should introduce allergens as early as 4-6 months according to the AAP and recent landmark studies. In addition, the AAP ...


3

It sounds like the hardest part for most parents (weaning off of the nighttime nursing) is done, so great job there! I would honestly recommend just taking things one step and day at a time. Start communicating with your toddler about the changes, shorten the amount of nursing that is done in each session, and then try to cut the number of times you do nurse ...


3

Breastfeeding is a mutual relationship. Both parties must want to, and if either one of you decides that it's the end, then that's it. If you give in to tantrums, you're reinforcing her behaviour. She knows that if she cries enough and throws enough of a tantrum, you'll let her have her way. A bit of crying and a tantrum is not going to do any damage to her. ...


3

One word: bananas. There are many different reasons why your baby will refuse solids at those ages - sometimes it is simply uncomfortable for them, it may be "false teething" (not sure if this is a thing with an actual name, but some kids show symptoms like teething months before teething starts), it could be strong tastes (did you change the way ...


2

I suggest a specific baby spoon. These are usually plastic or with a rubber coating. An adult metal spoon might hurt them if they flail, protest or bite down hard. That said, what is wrong with the bottle? Current advice is to leave weaning (onto solid foods) until after 6 months and if breast milk is not an option, the bottle seems like the best way to ...


2

The clinginess and lower appetite has absolutely nothing to do with night weaning, most likely. It is 100% normal at this age. Separation and stranger anxiety are very common in 11 month olds. This behavior may last, with some ebb and flow, until 18 months or even later. Also clinginess is associated with developmental leaps, and there is one around 11 ...


2

Weaning is a personal choice for you and him. There is no magical date, but if you feel like he's ready and you're ready, then congratulations: you've done a great job. If you're concerned about how much he's getting, you could give him known quantities of expressed milk in a cup or bottle-- but since you've been feeding him for so long, you can probably ...


2

We gave labneh, home made yoghourt, egg yolk, mashed apple, banana and pear when he was 6 months old.


2

Stephie is right, reverse the feeding order. Hunger is powerful. Keep the pouch and other favored items out of sight and start with the more solid stuff first. To be honest I wouldn't worry about it too much, but if you want to play hardball, make it seem like there's nothing else. Make feeding time over, and come back to it in 10mins. (10min is an ...


2

Breastfeeding is very good for children. According to the World Health Organisation, the average age, worldwide, at which children stop breastfeeding is 4.7 years. So it is not unhealthy for children to still be breastfeeding at 3 years: she's not even near the average. Having said that, if you want to move her away from breastfeeding, try to introduce ...


2

We had exactly the same problem, at almost the same age. The one thing that really helped us was by getting a completely different cup for bed time unlike any of her other day time cups. In our case this was a munchkin 360 cup with no handles and a different colour. (all her other cups have handles). I think the novelty of a completely different new cup ...


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