9

If there has been no allergic reaction then there is no need to test with two exceptions. Family history of a lethal reaction. For example if Grandma is allergic to fish, and Mom is allergic to fish, then be extra careful with fish around the child. Doctors advise allergen testing. I'm not one to say blindly follow doctors' advice, but if a doctor is ...


6

Use sunbutter or wowbutter and jelly. They are peanut butter substitutes that are supposed to taste exactly like peanut butter, but are both 100% peanut free! I have a peanut allergy and I eat it all the time.


5

One thing that has worked well for me with my middle child who has many food allergies is serving something that is a little bit 'everyone makes their own' like a salad bar or taco bar. So while everyone is having tacos, those who can eat black beans have black beans and those who cannot don't. This may meet your daughter's desire to eat the same thing ...


4

This should be a good introduction into learning how to do those things that you mention in your last paragraph. Explain to him that even though "X" is yummy to eat, it makes mommy very sick so whenever we eat it and, really, whenever we eat anything, we should practice proper hygiene and wipe our hands and mouth after we eat it. Teach him how to and help ...


4

The main consideration with infant sunscreens are they should be Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide based only; not only will these be much less irritating1, but they are considered safer. Infants absorb a lot more through their skin than older children and adults, and so the Oxybenzone and other organic chemicals in many adult (and even some child) sunscreens ...


4

If the dietary needs of your husband and your daughter are at odds, could you arrange it so that (it appears that) everyone at the table has their own very special meal? That way, nobody is singled out that they eat something different from the rest. And if your daughter still wants to occasionally eat some bites from your or your husband's plate, try to ...


4

These family mealtimes you now fondly look back at, are not memories from when you were two years old. Consider if this is a goal you can postpone until your child is old enough to reason about these things, and perhaps (I don't know if this is applicable to you) outgrow some of her allergies. Besides, if the value of these mealtimes was to come together ...


3

You've got it backwards. Introducing foods early reduces the chances of allergies. https://readysetfood.com/blogs/community/the-aap-s-new-guidelines-for-infant-food-allergy-prevention-what-families-need-to-know “In fact, parents should introduce allergens as early as 4-6 months according to the AAP and recent landmark studies. In addition, the AAP ...


3

I am not a doctor, but I believe so. I would call your pediatrician and do some google-ing in the meantime. And, keep your baby away from peanuts for now. I know people have varying degrees of sensitivities and I've known friends that can have a reaction from contact with someone else that had contact with whatever they are allergic to. I don't see why ...


2

It's important to distinguish lactose intolerance from dairy allergy. Lactose intolerance occurs when the body loses the ability to digest lactose. Someone with lactose intolerance can consume lactose-free dairy products (including hard cheeses) without trouble; lactose-containing dairy products will cause gastrointestinal upset, but no other problems. On ...


2

Normally everyone will start the solids food when the kid is around 6th month. It is the right time to start the food. I would like to share that you can start with the sweet potato it has to be smooth so that LO should have any difficult while having it. And you can give cereal rice(paste or grid it) smoothly. I think you can start with the single grain ...


2

I read this article and it explains well about the baby food in the first year. Baby Food Stage 1: Birth to 4 months What to feed: Only food for infants is breast milk or infant formula to meet all their nutritional needs. Recommended milk is breast milk only. You should start giving formula or any other substitute in case breast milk supply is ...


2

If by "local rash" you mean a red patch on the chin or something, odds are very high it's got nothing to do with the foods you are feeding him, particularly if it's something like rice that virtually nobody is allergic to. Most babies start drooling at the same age as they start eating solids (in fact, it's considered a sign of readiness), and most often it'...


2

The earliest recommended age for weaning is 4 months, and as you cannot feed him milk, there is no reason not to start on solid foods. Mashed up, or puréed fruits or vegetables - banana, apple, pear, carrot, potato, parsnip etc. These are very simple first foods, and while they are messy, babies rapidly learn how to eat them. Once they are happily eating ...


2

Like the comment above, the first thing we need to know is the age of the child. For example, a young child with a needle phobia is going to freak out when you use the epi pen (or similar). Those HURT. A lot. Expecting a child to be calm when you are shoving a needle in their leg (and holding it for 10-15 seconds) is not reasonable. In this case, remember ...


2

The best sunscreen is one that doesn't trigger her allergies. There's no "one size fits all" here -- for example, I'm allergic to a common ingredient (I don't know which one) in most "hypoallergenic" sunscreens. What you should do is test sunscreens as you get them: spread a small amount on the inside of her wrist (one of the places where the skin is the ...


1

(Granted this question is 6 years old and so the kid has grown a lot since then, but for others): I would consult your pediatrician and/or an allergist. My baby had his first allergy reaction at only 7 months and we found some unusual things for him to be allergic to, including garlic. I would not feed him any of the things you think he might be ...


1

As long as you can not see any obvious health issues (coughing, scratching, pain or worse) it is unlikely to be an allergy. If you want to be absolutely sure, you need to see a doctor, however I doubt your little one will love to get about 20-30 needles into his arms for the test. Alternatively you can try small doses of what you think might cause an ...


1

It is an ongoing struggle to get my 6 yo to wash up after eating things my 4 yo is allergic to. Be vigilant and help with washing hands and face after eating. You mention that you have kissed your partner and caused allergy issues. Until he learns to wash out his mouth, she might have fewer issues if your child kisses her only on the cheek instead of the ...


1

If there are no allergic symptoms you don't actually need to test it proactively. Yes if your child has running nose or constant cough or some ongoing allergic symptoms. it is time to find out what is the reason & how it can be handled. Know complete details about childhood allergies & treatment plan here. http://www.ssdhospital.com/childhood-...


1

I tend to use Trello to track all kinds of things. It's essentially a series of lists grouped into a board. The app (android) is great, as is the website and will allow for multiple users (Parents, grandparents, caregivers) to log in and make changes/add new entries. As an example you could create lists for foods eaten, and if there is a reaction to that ...


1

I'm using Feed Baby (Pro) to track feeding, sleeping, diapers and so on. I find it very user-friendly, for example you tap to log what is going on now, and you hold to log an event that happend in the past. You can just select and tap to add an event without details or add a short note. It has cloud backup, and you can synchronize accross devices. The ...


1

Trixie Tracker has a section for eating, as far as I can recall. You have to pay for that. It stores data online. I don't know if it will correlate data, but you can enter observations about meals. I has been 3 years since I have used it, so you may want to double check. Care Zone has tools for managing anyones health. It is mostly about medications and ...


1

This goes without saying, but for 1), talk to your pediatrician right away - don't wait for the next regular appointment. Take a food log, take pictures, keep notes on times, and then go in and show them what you have. Your pediatrician should be experienced at dealing with food allergies and be able to tell you if this is something to be concerned about ...


1

While life would be easier if you could always connect A to B, things usually aren't that simple. It's quite possible that the "bunch of red bumps" you describe were a) there already but you didn't notice, b) related to something entirely different, or c) essentially random (which describes most baby acne). If you want to make sure, I'd just dab some ...


1

try making your own tahini by frying sesame seeds till slightly brown. once cooled blend them till powder like and mix some olive oil to combine and salt to taste. im addicted to it!


1

We used Almond Butter, it looks and tastes comparable but contains no peanuts. But the camp might have problems with that too, although they are generally made specifically as peanut-butter substitute and are thus safe for peanut allergies.


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