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10

There is no scientific basis to the idea that cold milk would upset a baby's stomach more than warmed milk. Per the CDC: Breast milk does not need to be warmed. It can be served room temperature or cold. However, the CDC recommends to Swirl the breast milk to mix the fat, which may have separated. Cold milk will release less of it's aromatics. For ...


10

For most children, cow's milk (organic or not at your preference) will be the superior choice. Whole milk is usually recommended from 1-2 years old, although there is starting to be some preference for 2% even at that age for children at high risk and who have good, healthy diets with plenty of fats and vegetables (like my second, who at 18 months though an ...


8

Ok, not from a professional, but from a parent's perspective: It seems you have built yourselves a nice battlefield with your son - I sense a power play and a lot of unnecessary tension. A vicious cycle. First step: Stop this right now. That means, no yelling, no fusing and, above all, no force feeding. Try to eliminate this battle ground completely. ...


6

Kids have all sorts of eating habits; any one particular difference isn't at all something to be concerned about. My oldest (3) drinks all the milk he can find, my younger (21 mo) doesn't drink as much of anything and relatively little milk. The one reason milk is something to think about is that milk is the primary source of calcium and vitamin D for ...


6

So long as it's only powder and not made up then that's fine. I can say that pretty confidently as when it is manufactured it is turned from a liquid product into powder using a process called spray drying and that even a 'cool' process will be quite a bit hotter than 40 deg! For a walkthrough of the facilities used to produce infant formula, GEA Process ...


5

Formula can be stored in the fridge for a short period of time, just as any other milk product; the general recommendation is to store it no longer than 24 hours, so that seems longer than the timeframe you are describing (I assume you will make it in the morning, say, and then use it throughout the day). Some references for that timeframe are kidshealth, ...


5

It's hard to tell from the info in your question whether this is a medical issue or a behavioral one, or a combination of the two. It's clear that force-feeding is backfiring and not getting the desired result. We've followed the advice of Ellyn Satter on The Division of Responsibility for Feeding Kids, and it's worked well for our 1-year-old so far. The ...


5

There are two reasons such a habit is bad for baby's teeth. I, as well as others, elaborate further on both problems in response to this question. The first is that prolonged use of a bottle can impact mouth shape and tooth position. The second has to do with the chemical contents of the milk and the propensity for tooth decay as well as gum disease. ...


5

Milk bought in stores undergoes a process called homogenisation which ensures that globules of different sizes, which naturally exist in milk, are split into smaller pieces, which in turn allows the fluid to not separate when left on its own. Breast milk is not homogenised, so larger fats will separate from smaller fats, all fats will separate from proteins ...


4

It's not uncommon, especially if your heritage includes anything other northwestern European. If you have any lineage from any of the cultures of the world that weren't historically herders, then there is a chance that her body will stop producing lactase -- the enzyme required to properly digest milk -- and she is becoming lactose intolerant. About 65% of ...


3

Obviously very hard to pinpoint the problem without being there to run some tests, but I had a thought. If you're using tap water to make the bottle and his grandparents live in a different neighborhood than you do, it's possible that the water tastes different there and maybe even hurts his stomach. Even though you add milk powder, the different taste of ...


3

At first glance this seems to be about the milk. I believe this is a red herring, and given the very small range of expression available to your very young child, demanding milk is the only way he has to communicate what he needs. If you step back and look at this from the perspective of developmental psychology, a different understanding is available. It ...


3

That's only helpful if your bottle is too full with the full amount of water, making it hard to dissolve the formula by shaking. If that's not the case (i.e., there's enough air above the water+formula), there's no need to fill the bottle in stages. Reading the company's instructions (pointed out by not store bought dirt) we can also see that they advice ...


3

She should be coming up on her 15 month visit in a few. See if she has fallen off her growth curve at that visit. You'll probably be surprised that she will not have done so. In the meantime, lots of kids show variability in their eating. Keep offering her baby foods (try some fruits), cereals, or pureed table foods (introduce with care; she's still young). ...


2

I have also a two-year-old child, and before bed-time she always take a glass of water, also if she doesn't really need it. In general I think that to respect a routine during bed-time is really important. I'm not sure if my suggestion will be right, but maybe you could try to introduce only little changes. For example taking the bottle of milk with you, and ...


2

As far as cold milk I wouldn't recommend that, especially for young babies. Their tummies are sensitive, plus their body does use energy to bring that fluid to body temperature to be used. Room temperature is fine but you do want to knock the chill off cold milk out of the fridge.


2

Dr David Ludwig and Dr Walter Willet published a 2013 opinion column in JAMA Pediatrics that questioned the value of recommending low-fat or skim milk for children. While much of the article is behind a paywall, I did find a discussion of the opinion column (and it was also discussed on Time). Ludwig and Willett argued in their paper that children who ...


2

There is nothing to worry about when feeding cold milk to your child. My daughter is three months four on the 7th of Sept. As soon as she started drinking cold milk I actually took every chance I could to do so because it took to long to make a bottle for my daughter. By the time I got half way done she would be screaming on the top of her lungs because I ...


2

Will your child drink water from a cup? And does your child like milk-substitute products like cheese, yogurt, etc? If so, you might want to just rely on those. It's never a good idea to turn mealtime into conflict situation. Eventually, your child's memories of drinking from a nipple will fade and you can reintroduce milk. In the meantime, make certain ...


2

The World Health Organization has created a handy pamphlet with fairly detailed instructions for preparing, storing and re-warming formula in care settings. There is no upper limit to the temperature when mixing the formula, but the water should be cool enough not to burn you. Boiling the water kills bacteria in the water, and a temperature of at least 70C ...


1

It seems like a change of environment, kids' diet and habits are impacted by surrounding. It could be temperature, number of people, other food options, noise, or lights. You need to simulate his actions and find out what he might like to eat otherwise. It should be his sleep due to a change in bed too that can impact his diet. Hope this helps.


1

I would not worry. Most cultures don't stress drinking milk once the baby has weaned. If you're not concerned about weight and your baby eats a nutrient dense and diverse diet, then I don't think you need to stress. There was a period where our baby did not want cows milk (recommended by doctors here after breast milk or formula) but she was tracking just ...


1

Drinking from a bottle on an ongoing basis can be quite bad for a child's teeth, causing tooth decay and other problems. On the other hand, cow's milk on a continuing basis is completely optional; your child can get equally high quality protein and fat from meat and calcium from green leafy vegetables. Unless you are talking about pumped breast milk, I ...


1

I am an old fashioned mother. Do you like your food cold? We learn from the time we are born. When I was a baby my milk was always warm. As I matured all meals were warm. Warming was a sign of love. A small baby should be given the benefit of having a warm bottle and not a cold icy drink. Warmth is associated with love.


1

I will post a different opinion. Children need calcium and Vit.D, and milk is a rich source of both (the Vit.D is added). Kids between 1 and 2 years old should have whole milk to help provide the dietary fats they need for normal growth and brain development. If a child that young stopped drinking milk, it would concern me a bit, because it's harder to get ...


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