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Get his favorite characters on your side. What are his favorite cartoons? Video games? Movies? YouTubers? Look for material that meets yous standards in that crowd. Parents might have a blind spot for annoying characters which the children love.


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Speaking of my own scholastic growth and change in reading habits as a child, like all others have said, any type of reading is good, but I suppose I would add that you can certainly help to steer and culture his interest's, such as they are. For me, it was actually a love of taking anything and everything apart, curiosity, of how things worked. My ...


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Anecdotal evidence, perhaps, but lived experience nonetheles: I read almost exclusively comic books ("graphic novels" didn't exist back then) until I was 12. Reading was never something my parents, teachers, etc. wanted from me, it was something that I wanted because I enjoyed it so much. I moved to text-only children's books and "serious"...


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My son (who is now 14 and always has been a voracious reader) is adamant about letting children read graphic novels, and I agree. The most important thing is to not spoil the fun. I feel a certain anxiousness in your post, and it I see that you want to move him on to "better" reading. Be careful! Offers are great. I like the cliffhangers, they are ...


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I wanted to suggest also examining his reading from a wider vantage point of how it fits into the rest of his life and routine based on my own experiences. I'll give three areas to consider as a departure point: Is this reading part of a fixed bedtime routine (eg, late at night for him)? How is he doing with the parts of his school curriculum which involve ...


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I want to maybe touch on something else, that kind of ties into expanding reading avenues outside of "text" based novels, but I've not seen covered. Have you tried getting your son interested in any non-fiction? I was a child who struggled to muster interest in reading books, and my parents managed to get around this by buying me non-fiction in ...


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This addresses only one aspect of @Becuzz's excellent answer, and @Paul Johnson suggested it (albeit very briefly.) So, nothing new here, just fleshing it out. My first child was reluctant to move from easy reads to more demanding ones. This is how the problem was dealt with: I bought a series of books in a subject that I knew he would love. (I knew what he ...


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Your son sounds like my son! A few years ago I went through the same struggle. Bright kid, reading way above grade level, but spends all of his time reading Dogman and Captain Underpants. Tried a bunch of books that I loved, brick wall. He'd read a page or two and then back to the Captain. By now, he reads "text" books all the time. Not ...


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You say you already read to your son at night. One option would be to read to him, but then say you've had enough and put the book down just as its getting exciting, and leave him to read on if he wants.


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Continue with your practice of encouraging your son to read, and have patience. Reading to him, buying books and going together to the library to borrow books are all great ways to help develop reading skills. Just be patient. Your child will "graduate" to books with text content when he is ready. To encourage reading books with text content, cast ...


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So it looks like you have two questions, how to foster a love of reading and how to get your son to start reading more reading-level appropriate books (that phrasing was chosen carefully, I'll get to that in a moment). As far as fostering a love of reading goes, it sounds to me like your son already has that. If he enjoys reading, no matter the book, that ...


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