New answers tagged

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There are so many options you can explore! Of course continue to read to your child. I often read while my child eats, paints/colors, etc. They do not need to be paying full attention to still experience books and listen. I am unsure of the exact age of your children, but books that engage my child the most are ones that are interactive- tabs to pull open, ...


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On resources, the LeapFrog "Letter Factory" and "Talking Words Factory" videos are excellent (links are to short clips on YouTube). They also do a range of electronic toys, which were very good back when my son was 3 (but that was a long time ago).


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I have a 3 year old son that can spell out / read slowly - so I would say you can start whenever you want. My son could sing the alphabet at 2½ year old and what I've found is that singing is the best way for him to learn things he should memorize, like the alphabet, weekdays etc. I just make up a song for the occasion if there is none already, and soon he ...


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I recommend the book Nurture Shock. It has some very interesting things in it about child development that would seem to be of interest to you. About whether what your child can do is normal, my answer is that it doesn't matter. The focus should be on developing your child in all areas at whatever skill level he exhibits, regardless of whether any of that is ...


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I'm not a child psychologist, but I have 9 children. Every one of them is as different from the rest as you can imagine. One of them learned to read by 3. Another didn't start reading until 8. The rest were in between. The one that learned to read by 3 progressed very slowly. The one that didn't start reading until 8 was reading JRR Tolkien within a year. ...


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A lot of good answers here! In my experience, if a house if full of books and the children see that their parents enjoy reading, chances are, they will pick it up themselves. Just make sure that they are offered books they enjoy. If one child hates reading in a family where everyone else is a reader, I would book a visit to the optometrist for a vision check....


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Just to answer the comic book question: Yes, embrace comics! Comics are such a rewarding low-threshold introduction to reading. One can start "reading" comics without being able to read text but I remember that as a little child I wanted to understand the story better and understand what the characters said. This desire is a strong incentive to ...


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Beware the non-blind test. Your child may well be above-average intelligence. However it's also important not to forget that you aren't running blind tests here. For starters, you have a definite interest in the outcome. You may be seeing things because you want to. This is massively significant in everything to do with childcare. More seriously though, ...


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I'm assuming your children are 6 and younger, but even if they are older, these tips still apply (though it might be harder to get their attention at first). No matter what age they are, read to them. Because they may find reading difficult (especially if they are very young), reading to them helps introduce them to the worlds they can find in books, with ...


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There's more to reading than 'fun'. It is a social (in the early stages) and cognitive journey. Words in written form are likely to come to your children well after TV cartoons and audio. Turn off the TV Turn off the TV Don't turn the TV on. Get excited about turning ABC into dragons and princesses and space rockets and things that lurk behind the fridge. ...


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Pedro has a good point and yes, I am TheBigJoe. This is my school account that I rarely use and I agree with everything he says.....Almost. Even though I dont agree that reading is lazy, I do agree that pushing kids to do something, is like adding fuel to the ¨I dont want to¨ or ¨I dont like it (Even though they havent tried it)¨ fire. If they dont want to ...


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You child is probably gifted, but you need a specialized test to tell that (impossible to assess over the internet by strangers). It seems like he is hitting developmental milestones a few years ahead of the average for his age (see CDC's developmental milestones). There are several tests available for testing gifted children starting from as early as 2 ...


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You can make your kids read if You can read them books let them try graphic novels if they want tell them if they read a 'hard' chapter book, they can get a prize. (Toys, games, etc.) lastly you can get them to the library, let them chose a book they want. Hopefully this works!


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You can put a lock or a timer or a scheduler on the TV to make sure it's only on for a few hours per day, say 1. Make a game of it, call the cupboard the goggle box and put a lock on the cupboard. House rules are house rules and kids respect that as long as they are told why cartoons lower attention when watched more than 5 hours per week or perhaps even ...


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Just going to contribute my personal experience. I'm a heavy reader and started as a kid in primary school. Like others said, some kids might be more disposed to reading than others, but here's what jumpstarted it for me: Our local library had a program where kids would earn prizes for reading certain amounts of books. Everytime you would borrow a book (or ...


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Speaking from experience1, your child is advanced, very likely gifted - but it happens. Remember that “normal” is just a statistical distribution and doesn’t imply any value or sense of wrong or right. (You may need that image in a few years down the road when your child wonders why he’s “not normal”.) I am very sure that while your support and encouragement ...


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The other answers are very good, I would like to make the screen-time/reading contrast even clearer. A printed page is never going to be able to compete with a glowing rectangle. Screens are just too attention-grabbing. (If you would like to test this, find the most boring YouTube video you can, set it up in the room, and see whether your children choose to ...


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I had a hard time learning to read at first. Here's what my mom, dirt-poor but college-educated, did for us: She read to us every night when she put us to bed. Not just kids' books; she read some Stephen King and other pop fiction (skipping parts we weren't ready for). She found a place that printed customized books with our names in them, and we got a ...


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A Tale of Two Children I have two boys, both grown now, but they were very different. We read to them every night, multiple books, and they both loved being read to. However, when the older one came to reading age he simply wasn't interested at all. We sat with him incessantly, reading with him, taking him to the library, doing everything we could. In ...


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I'm a librarian. I think it should revolve around "fun". There is so many books with so many diffrent contents. There is better chance that children like reading if they find something they like in a book. So, the first thing should be find out what kinds of books children can love. MY suggestion is, to bring them to a public library, let them just ...


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I can't beat the existing best answer! But to add a few more points... Don't underestimate the value of pictures If your children are too young to read, the pictures help the child stay with the story, whilst you read the words. The really good ones, like Axel Scheffler for Julia Donaldson's books, add extra depth to the story. And you can involve the child ...


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I am not a parent, but I was a child who loved to read. Below are the factors that led to my love of reading: Limits on Other Forms of Escapism Video games were banned and television and movies were allowed within reason, but limited. I was allowed to read as much as I wanted. This helped me preserve my attention span for reading. Now that I'm an adult and ...


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Ok, So I am 16, I grew up watching TV and reading books and I can tell you from past experience with having a 6 year old sister that try and allow them to read, (or hide their electronics and tell them that the book pet hid them and wont give them back until they have read a certain amount of books). But usually if you act like you cant read it, then they ...


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To answer your first question, comic books are fine to introduce your children to reading. Our approach was "whatever works best" and we used a variety of book types and reading-related games. In general: Reduce screen time to a minimum. This will free up some time for more productive activities, such as reading and free play. See also ...


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Well, what Joe said is almost my point of view but more organized. First, how could reading be less "lazy" than social media or TV? The thing is what the content is, and when the kid gets his autonomy he will watch or read whatever pleases him... I personally think that a way to combat lazyness and keep kids/people healthy and interested in ...


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First off, I'd recommend you change your language some. "How do I make my kids..." never ends well. Your kids are their own people, and they'll choose to like, or not like, things; trying to "make them" like things is a fool's errand that will more often than not make them dislike that thing. However, I've been where you are. I wanted ...


10

Children see, children do. When they hang out with you, or even nearby you, read a lot of books. When they look interested, show them what you're reading and talk to them about it. Make silly faces and voices as you read the books out loud. Name one of the characters after your children or anyone they know well. Then, to capture their interest even without ...


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First, to make them enjoy books: Read to your children Without competition the most important aspect. Your kids enjoy spending time with you, so they'll love when you read to them. Make sure you read to them every day. Include it in the bedtime routine, but also read to them in the daytime, when the ambition isn't for them to fall asleep, but to listen to ...


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