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Stephie hit it spot on. At 5, his world is entirely created by your choices. Screens and the media on them triggers strong hormone responses in humans, specially young ones, they are carefully crafted to. Creativity, problem solving and internal motivation grow from necessity, and boredom is a fantastic and safe motivator. Choose some small weekend time for ...


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I have a child with some mild executive function disorders, their impulse control falters under certain conditions. We spent about a year thinking it was deliberate, obstinate, and/or intentionally defiant behavior. Once they went thru a neuropsych evaluation and we got to working with a pediatric psychologist, it was a huge eye opener. Understanding it not “...


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On resources, the LeapFrog "Letter Factory" and "Talking Words Factory" videos are excellent (links are to short clips on YouTube). They also do a range of electronic toys, which were very good back when my son was 3 (but that was a long time ago).


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He’s five, so his TV (and iPad and game console and...) time should be minimal and you still have the authority to simply cut it. Of course, there’s school work and remote lessons, but I see no reason why he should have unlimited access. The next step for me would be to make sure that there’s a good selection of “material” available, ranging from his usual ...


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I have a 3 year old son that can spell out / read slowly - so I would say you can start whenever you want. My son could sing the alphabet at 2½ year old and what I've found is that singing is the best way for him to learn things he should memorize, like the alphabet, weekdays etc. I just make up a song for the occasion if there is none already, and soon he ...


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I recommend the book Nurture Shock. It has some very interesting things in it about child development that would seem to be of interest to you. About whether what your child can do is normal, my answer is that it doesn't matter. The focus should be on developing your child in all areas at whatever skill level he exhibits, regardless of whether any of that is ...


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I'm not a child psychologist, but I have 9 children. Every one of them is as different from the rest as you can imagine. One of them learned to read by 3. Another didn't start reading until 8. The rest were in between. The one that learned to read by 3 progressed very slowly. The one that didn't start reading until 8 was reading JRR Tolkien within a year. ...


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Beware the non-blind test. Your child may well be above-average intelligence. However it's also important not to forget that you aren't running blind tests here. For starters, you have a definite interest in the outcome. You may be seeing things because you want to. This is massively significant in everything to do with childcare. More seriously though, ...


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You child is probably gifted, but you need a specialized test to tell that (impossible to assess over the internet by strangers). It seems like he is hitting developmental milestones a few years ahead of the average for his age (see CDC's developmental milestones). There are several tests available for testing gifted children starting from as early as 2 ...


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Speaking from experience1, your child is advanced, very likely gifted - but it happens. Remember that “normal” is just a statistical distribution and doesn’t imply any value or sense of wrong or right. (You may need that image in a few years down the road when your child wonders why he’s “not normal”.) I am very sure that while your support and encouragement ...


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