New answers tagged

1

I am a psychotherapy student. :) CAMH (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) is a leading institute that offers mental health research and advice. See their resource centre for mental health and COVID-19. They also have a section about how to talk to children. http://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19 I strongly advise looking for ...


1

Most answers focus on explaining why it is important that the virus is super infectious and what we can do to decrease the spread. These are incredibly valuable. For me, it helps if you understand what a virus is. I think the basic concept isn't that difficult. I use lego as a simplified analogy. I generally dislike simplified analogies in arguments because ...


-3

The question seems like the thing I'd write after having a big fight. The difference is that I would not post it and I know I'll regret posting it after a few days once both of us calm down. She's been like this for 18 years and you are still together, so no matter how bad it is, you tolerated it for 18 years and chances are you will collect yourself and ...


2

There are some great YouTube videos that have been put together by Michelle Dickinson aka NanoGirl. This one is explicitly aimed at kids: Coronavirus Explained! (For kids) as is this one: How to teach your children how hand washing helps prevents the spread of coronavirus This one is a round table with the New Zealand Prime Minister: Coronavirus COVID-19 ...


2

Thank you, Mr. President. It's not easy for me either. I also stay at home all the time. I don't shake hands with anyone, not in a long time. I wash my hands thoroughly, every day, as it should be, over and over again. We just have to fight this virus. It is more important than ever that we all help each other. Especially the older generation. The ...


2

I did this as a pen-and-paper game with my small child. It was dotted paper, I said "each of these dots is a person, now look I'm going to make this one sick." I coloured in one dot with a pen. "This is day one." "The next day this one makes two more people sick." I took a different coloured pen and coloured two adjacent dots, and crossed off the first. "...


1

To my 3 years old niece we have told that we have to stay inside because there are invisible "little monsters" which can make people badly sick, and we don't want to come in touch with them. The "little monsters" were more easy for her to understand than the concept of virus/bacteria, and she has been happy with that explanation.


3

The mother does not seem like she will change her ways. Some people might encourage you to try to talk to her about her treatment of the kids, to give her an ultimatum, but personally I think this could just make the situation worse. You need to get the kids away from her. The best way to do this would be the legal route, unless you greatly expect that she ...


14

To you and me, this lockdown is unprecedented. To a four year old child, everything is unprecedented. They are used to new things happening because new things happen all the time to them. “There are lots of dangerous germs around at the moment that can stick to your hands and make you sick if they get into your mouth, that’s why we don’t meet other people ...


1

You've already got some good and sensible answers, I think, but I'll my views anyway. I think we quite often can make too much of an issue of problems like this. My approach with my children (and now grandchildren) is more straight forward: I would simply ask directly, "Are you worried about what you hear about [...]?", and then take it from there. ...


18

Some great resources exist already for this. Here are a few my child's school has suggested, which I also think are fantastic. The CDC site on talking to children about Coronavirus focuses both on parents ("remain calm and reassuring," "provide information that is honest and accurate," etc.) and on facts that are presented in a way children can understand -...


60

First of all, recognize that your concerns may not be the same as your four year old's concerns. This has two implications: Your child may be worried about things you couldn't have thought of. Your child is likely shielded from or doesn't understand a lot of what's going on, and that can also mean that they don't have access to bits of information that ...


2

If she refuses therapy and wants to party lifestyle she is clearly not fit to be a mother. Child Protection seems to be your best bet because what else can you do? I don't know how it works in Hong Kong but here the child(ren) are often placed under supervision where a counselor comes by to talk tot hem and regularly keep an eye on them (asking how mommy ...


0

A very successful approach are picture books with many details (e.g. animals). The you show the baby: look at this, a little bear etc. then you ask: where is the little bear? And the baby shows. You ask: who/what is this? The baby says: little bear. Then you are describing what he‘s doing, what he wears, what he is doing and later you ask the ...


23

One classic trick that I've used in the past with my kids is to talk to favorite toy instead of the child directly. The goal is to bait the kid into either talking to the toy or best of all talking for/as the toy. The technique works because it can feel less threatening to talk indirectly about things. I've mostly used this technique when my children are ...


1

This very simple: You’re not allowed, you have to forbid yourself to use more than one adjective, more than one verb, more than one noun, more than on subject, more than one object or adverb in one sentence respectively in one phrase especially when you give advices, orders, instructions etc. etc. This will discipline yourself to be short and not long, ...


1

The way to promote functional literacy is to read to your child often about a variety of subjects on their level, like every. single. day. Since you're a bilingual home, both parents will need to do this in their own language. I started reading to my first child as soon as they were able to rest on my lap, at about 4 months. At seven months, they said their ...


5

I don't know but I have a feeling ;-) " So tonight I wanted to ask if they were feeling ok. But I didn't want to give them any leading prompts, in case I projected that worry onto them. I tried asking why they wanted mummy or daddy to stay next to them.. " As a kid from the above example I would get the feeling that my parent is worried or knows there is ...


24

A child that I am close to (7) has had some events in her life that made her a bit closed off, but she loves to draw so her mother taught her to express herself through drawing. She asked her to draw how she feels each day, and from the reoccurring themes she was able to see that on the days she seemed sad she often drew herself alone and the drawings ...


3

I think you may be trying to put too much pressure on him. While I doubt he would feel it now, he would in a few years. You don't know what he will like. You don't know what he will be good at. The same applies to every young child. His condition does not change that. However, since you mention that he may lose his hearing, I would definitely suggest ...


2

Three is very young to have any guess as to direction, in my experience. At that age, they're really experiencing everything, and only after experiencing many things will they have any sense of what is actually "for" them. That typically happens at six or later, from what I've seen. The most important thing, though, is to allow this to happen organically. ...


8

My 15 year-old has severe cerebral palsy. It's not technically progressive, but we had no way of knowing early on how extensive it would turn out to be, and it affects her differently as she ages. I'm going to tell you what I wish I understood when she was 3. I don't think I was ready to hear it back then, but I'm going to tell you anyway. Don't focus on ...


Top 50 recent answers are included