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1

I think one key here in addition to the other great answers is to focus on whether you need the task completed now, and having different approaches based on that. Tasks that need to be completed now would be something like putting on clothes/shoes before going to school/church. You have a deadline, and it's necessary for the child to accomplish the task ...


4

Such "regressions" in behavior at this age are very common and often pass without any substantial efforts on behalf of the parents. I would start with asking yourself the question that, sadly, parents rarely ask: "Is this task even necessary?" Sometimes it turns out that the it is not. To use your example, it is sometimes not necessary ...


5

I think my first question would be: why are they refusing on this occasion? Has something changed recently? Are they scared of something? Did they get hurt on a previous occasion? Without knowing more about the task in question I can only speculate, but these are the kinds of questions to ask. (Since you mention "getting changed", I'll add that the ...


0

Regardless of age, there are health benefits from regular meal times: reduced risk of the metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risk factors, including BMI and blood pressure. Regarding children, having regular meal times is one of the strategies to make family meals more frequent. More frequent family meals are associated with greater consumption of ...


1

I am thinking there may be a general issue of establishing appropriate routines in general, as it is impossible to have any consistent routine if meals are all over the place (unfortunately I know this from experience). Ultimately, habits define the kind of person we are, and routine can be thought of as the basis of or even synonymous to habit. Routines in ...


6

I suspect that the most important thing your son wants to hear as a response is That I spend a lot of time working is not a rejection of you; I love you and I cherish the time we spent together. That said, one important reason why people work is to be able to buy stuff is a basic fact about the how the world works. The question of how to chose a fulfilling ...


3

Your child sounds like he could've been me as a child. I had exactly the same problem, and the same way of thinking about it. I didn't know how to go to sleep, and my parents largely couldn't help me. I just knew that lights-out was a certain time, but when lights-out happened I usually would lay in bed for an hour or more. For me, I didn't really figure ...


5

I think you need to start with the original context, which was that this was a punishment for criminals. It was meant to be a very painful and public death, so that other people would see it and be afraid and not break the law. I don't know if she understands death yet, so you might have to spend a bit of time there first. Then you can explain that Jesus was ...


2

Beast Academy has books and online materials for teaching math to kids 8-13: https://beastacademy.com/ . From what you wrote, your 5-year-old brother could be at the 9-year-old level or higher. For our child, Beast Academy worked really well. Their program is very fun and engaging for the child, and teaches math concepts in a systematic way starting from ...


3

Yes, he will learn to moderate his tone over time. He feels safe with you, and so expresses his excitement (which at four is basically everything!) by being louder, while he has some anxiety that makes him be quieter with others (as most kids do that age). As he gets older both of those things will reduce while he also becomes more aware of the social ...


1

One piece of advice I received from a friend, who is a teacher, is to lean on books to help with the conversation. So I invested in new books focused on diversity and inclusion. Lots of multicultural stories and stories that emphasize how we all have differences and that they should be celebrated. That could be a way to have a very natural conversation ...


1

When I was young, I had a cousin the same age, and one a year older that I went to school with. I don't remember if we had any classes together..... There were no issues.... it is quite common for people from larger families to have siblings, cousins or other relatives in school together. There was even two half brothers the same age.... the father had been ...


4

Me and my cousin were same class from 3rd Grade to 8th Grade. His home was just walkable for me. We were't not very close in school even though we were in same class. It was a bit awkward when we see each other family gathering. I studied little better so his parents got worried sometimes. If we were just simply cousins rather than school mates our mutual ...


7

Family or close friends can be a boon or a barrier in school. They can help provide needed confidence, social inclusion and make going to school fun. They can also be a source of stress, keep the child from broadening his social circle or be a distraction. While I would generally see that the upside trumps the risk here it really depends on one thing: How is ...


16

Father of 11 year old twins here. Our kids were in the same group in pre-school (ages 0.5 to 6), then in different elementary schools (ages 6-9; there was a girls' school nearby that the girl liked and that wouldn't take the boy), finally they started out at different middle schools, but the girl joined the boy in his school & class halfway through 5th ...


22

Outside of competition, do you have any other concerns? I know many parents may prefer splitting up siblings like twins in school so that they can each open up with other students and not isolate themselves, but I don’t think this would be an issue with cousins. Competition happens naturally with friendships and family so I don’t think splitting them up ...


0

Consider issues of core strength or consider issues with motor planning. Or, maybe whatever he is playing is better suited to be played in a prone position.


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