New answers tagged

-1

Have you thought about taking her to a psychiatrist or psychologist? It sounds very clear that she doesn't do this to act out or get attention, she might just have adhd or another neurodivergency if it’s not a mental health issue. Sometimes it’s hard to understand that some people will never live up to your neurotypical standards because they just think ...


3

What you consider appropriate will be a personal decision, but Common Sense Media reviews for the movie based on the musical consider it appropriate for 14+ (by the website itself) or 10+/11+ (by parents/kids). They specifically mention low to moderate levels of violence, bad language, sex, and drinking/drug use/smoking. They also mention it's quite long. ...


1

I have a 5-year-old daughter and she would often get upset when it was time to get ready for bed, clean up her toys, etc. Time outs or taking toys away didn't motivate her at all to change her behavior, so we decided to implement a behavior chart. The idea behind a behavior/sticker chart is that people will do difficult (or even unpleasant) things if they ...


0

Obedience is not about respect, obedience is about fear. Fear of the consequences, even if it is just disappointing someone your respect. If you want obedience you have to make her fear. OTOH, if you want her to do it on her own because it’s the right thing to do, don’t expect her to do it just because you said so, and accept it when she doesn’t. Accepting ...


2

Follow the 3:1 rule. Attempt to have at least 3 positive interactions for every 1 negative one. And yes, that can be exhausting and isn't easy. If you need the kid to brush her teeth or comb her hair, having a huge supply of good feeling helps a lot. For brushing teeth, concretely: Talk to them about why you brush your teeth. Either because they are "...


9

When my kids went through this stage (they all do; you did as well, I expect) I had a good method. We did it together. "Now we'll all brush our teeth. Who wants green toothpaste?" "Time for shoes. I'll do your shoelaces if you do mine."


2

As all others said: a warm welcome to parenthood. Don't discount the possibility of not doing anything at all. You do not mention it in your question, but your sister may well be under pressure from the fact that your mother is away for a long time (maybe for the first time in your sister's live). Even if it's not obvious and she's not talking about it, that ...


21

As a father of a now 15 year old boy I have the following advice that seemed to work well: Don't enter power struggles. That's hard already for parents; it is probably harder for a big sister. You are the stronger one of two siblings, and when you both were younger you probably had to protect your stuff from her. But power struggles are pointless, annoying, ...


7

Welcome to parenthood, good fun, isn't it? Firstly, don't beat yourself up about "not being the best big sister". You'e probably doing just fine. I wouldn't go for the respect angle anyway. In fact, I wouldn't even try to be her parent, be her older sister, with emphasis on "sister". She probably looks up to you anyway, more than you ...


51

You're in a complicated position, but if it helps, so are most of us parents! What works will likely be the same sort of thing that works for me with my eight year old. Treat her like an adult, for the most part. Talk to her at your level — instead of acting like she's a child. There's nothing wrong with offering to spend more time with her to get her to ...


0

It may just be a fashion choice, she may be trying to figure out what feel like her it’s not always a bad thing when your child does something out of your comfort zone especially in her early and teen years, and if you do get a professional make sure it someone she feels comfortable with and that she can trust because otherwise it will make things worse, I ...


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