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1

I would recommend it, having grown up in a household where several languages were spoken, including languages my parents speak fairly fluently as well as some that were only dabbled in. It gave me both something general and something specific. The general advantage it gave me was an appreciation of different languages and language itself: how people use it, ...


1

Should I speak German with my child given I am not a native speaker but C1 level? This depends on how "good" your German really is. "C1" isn't a particularly great metric for this. Small kids are great at learning multiple languages if it happens in a "natural" context, i.e. through daily interaction with a native speaker on ...


2

Speaking from personal experience. We are a Russian-speaking family living in England. We wanted to ensure that our children speak Russian (we had twins). What we did was speak only Russian to them at home. When they went to nursery (kindergarden), they knew virtually no English words (other than their names maybe). It was an absolutely shock to them - ...


4

Teach your child as much as you can! There's no "risk" at all for her development. You might notice though that your child uses one language as "main", i.e. if you talk to her in Russian you might get a reply back in English. This is quite normal though for bilingual children and she will progress to full fluency and dual speech when she ...


4

There are a lot of answers to the general question of how to raise a bilingual child, but I haven't seen anyone mention singing along to music which would be great at this age. Songs stick in memory longer and the repetitive nature of songs gives you that small vocabulary without getting boring. Anything that you can do to make Russian fun will help her ...


2

We live in a somewhat similar situation, though both parents are Russian-speaking with children born in another country. We were advised to make a subconscious geographical boundary while they were young, with only Russian spoken at home (which is easy to do when everybody speaks it) - in particular with the goal that kids can communicate with their ...


3

It would be an advantage for your daughter to learn Russian language as early as possible. You should concentrate on teaching her Russian, and broadening her vocabulary. She will learn English by herself in school. It's no problem. But she has a unique chance to learn a second language at home, that not many kids have. I would suggest reading Russian poetry ...


6

We live in Finland, have two kids and one of the parents speaks Finnish natively, the other one Spanish. We also speak each others' languages and English. Our policy is that both parents speak only their native language to the kids, maybe translating individual words if the kids previously know the word only in a different language, or to be very certain ...


14

There is no harm in broadening the second language (e.g., Russian) vocabulary. Numerous studies have shown that bilingual and monolingual children have similar overall vocabulary sizes (see, for example, De Houwer et al (2014), and Pino Escobar et al (2018)). REFERENCES: [...] our study finds no evidence of consistent differences between young bilinguals’ ...


46

is this approach going to help her build connection with a basic vocabulary Yes should I try to broaden it as much as I can and as soon as I can? Yes. Progress the Russian and English vocabulary at the same pace and at whatever pace feels "natural". First of all, it's great that you are trying raise a bilingual child. This will be a great ...


1

Consider baby-led weaning (Rapley & Murkett, 2011). In this method of weaning, the child is feeding herself by picking up small bite-sized pieces of solid food. The child is typically much more attentive and alert when she is in control of the feeding process, and is more interested in the food. She is also less distracted and less interested in side ...


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