New answers tagged

3

A kid (even younger) should know the basics of how to bluff in some sort of table-game. And it should do "I pretend to be a policeman/mother/lion who does xyz" in a game. Or doing magic tricks with a straight face. All of that helps with being aware of their own mimic and gesture, and it helps being more aware of simple inter-human "tactics&...


1

How can we (a) end this kind of situation quickly before harm is done and I can think of some things worth trying: A physical stimulus to help him calm down and/or snap out of it. Over on Reddit, several people claim to have amazing results with popsicle showers. No, seriously: the combination of a warm shower and a cold thing to suck on seems to have an ...


2

First of all, I'm glad you've realized that communication breaks down and that consequences have no effect. Now that you know they don't work, you'll realize they're only harmful. Please refrain from punishment for a behavior that is out of the child's control at that moment (full disclosure: I'd say always refrain from punishment, but that's besides the ...


6

I would've commented on your question, but my limited reputation allows me only to directly answer. There have been already a couple of other answers suggesting your daughter might be on the autism spectrum. Chances are, if she is on the spectrum, and she can talk, she's mildly affected (level 1 autism, very manageable with proper support), and you shouldn't ...


-3

It might be worth looking at different developmental disorders and matching what behaviours your daughter has with them. If you think that she might have one them speak to a doctor and see if you can get a diagnosis. It is possible that she is Autistic. My girlfriend wasn't diagnosed with it until she was 30 despite having shown very obvious traits from ...


38

It's pretty common for kids to lack (to some degree) resilience/distress tolerance, but fortunately this is something that can be taught. It starts with kids understanding what their emotions are-- being able to notice and name "I am frustrated" vs "I am sad" vs "I am embarrassed". Overtime they can delve into more nuanced ...


5

Young children often go through phases of fascination with random objects or phenomena. The fact that something flies is a pretty cool quirk or anomaly in the physical world they've come to know. My mom told the story of how when my eldest brother was a toddler, he would sometimes pull Kleenexes out of boxes for many minutes on end. With each Kleenex, a ...


5

Its normal. He's trying to make sense of the world around him. This should be encouraged. If you google for "preschool science air" you will find some activities that you can do with him. For instance: This page shows how to link what a fan does with breathing, music and the wind. This page helps show how aircraft use the air to fly.


0

I see that such situations are frustrating for my boy. What response shall I teach him? On one hand I do not want him to be aggressive, on the other hand I want to find a fair solution for him so that he does not only play [the] role of a fool who gives up and gets out of her way. I agree with another answerer that you need to get your child other playmates ...


3

It's not your son's fault - you need to control other people's children instead Especially if you've invited them around your house. And especially if they're doing things which are unfair on your child. As far as possible, you let their parents intervene - but if they aren't on hand, or they're distracted, or they just haven't noticed, then you can and ...


8

Get your child other playmates in addition to this friend. I am not suggesting to avoid this friend, but instead dilute their interactions with hopefully more positive ones. Talk to your child, ask him what he feels when playing with that friend. Listen and pay attention. Ask him to name the feelings. Acknowledge the feelings. This does not mean approve of ...


57

I think the first thing is to take a step back and consider that they are both acting normally for their age. It's normal at age 2 and 3 to have limited social skills, limited empathy for others, and very little impulse control. It's not likely that the little girl is intentionally setting your son up to get in trouble when she gets an aggressive response ...


-2

Use real consequences immediately and every time he does it. All this ' try to understand him" is bologna. If you're an adult who's responsible for him, discipline him. If his mom has a problem with it, she should stay a single mom and raise herself an asshole. You're a parent, not a friend. He doesn't have to understand that running off is unsafe and ...


-1

Consult with a developmental pediatrician and have him evaluated by an occupational therapist. If there is an issue, it is best to catch it at an early age.


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