New answers tagged

1

This will be a guess, but from your description and the fact that it happens during a zoom class, I'm wondering if he might be hearing echoes of himself coming back from another participant's speaker? It can be incredibly difficult to speak when you hear a delayed echo of yourself, and it will often cause these prolongations or stutterings. There is even a ...


1

A common reason why a child may get overly excited, run around, and otherwise misbehave is due to lack of sleep. Try monitoring the total sleep time in hours (nighttime plus daytime), compare it to the recommended sleep time, and ensure that this common root cause of many problems is eliminated. REFERENCES: We can watch a child’s behavior during the day ...


0

Many years after asking this question my goddaughter is nearly 6 years old, and she still likes to turn her tablet upside down so I can't see anything, and laughs as I jokingly complain about going blind. She also likes to tell me she is going to hang up on me, then slowly hang up laughing while I, again jokingly, beg her not to; only to call me back a ...


1

Depending on how old said toddler is, I would try to give him some time during the weekdays to run around, to get that excess energy out. Aside from that I recommend closing and locking the bathroom door until you’ve applied the cream or maybe grab the book and the bottle and keep it with you so that he understands its time to relax.


3

After a while wondering why everyone on the internet seems to have such ineffectual advice, I came to realize my son does not react the same as most kids, and as such, the common advice won't work on him. My son is far more impulsive and heedless of consequences than other kids. I know because his younger sister responds the way people on the internet seem ...


1

I volunteer with young children regularly and have had to do research and training into child psychology as a result. Everything below should match the general conciseness from child psychologists about child sexuality, I'm sorry I don't have time to provide links to appropriate references though. As already said 'playing doctor' is a common behavior at ...


6

I have a 2yo and she does something similar. I try to minimize the opportunity for escape by closing doors and preparing everything beforehand, and then I lure her by encouraging to help me. I offer her the cream and ask her where she wants to put it on. They're usually really interested in helping, so framing it as something fun and exciting to help with is ...


0

The behavior you described is "learned"... meaning it isn't a natural development of them just playing together. I'd suggest talking to them to correct the behavior and then being very diligent about what they are exposed to. Kids will emulate what they see, and as a previous answer mentions, they see a lot! It sounds like you are already careful ...


10

Three strict rules --for me, not the kids --help me establish effective consequences with my children: Always make sure the consequence is directly and proportionally related to the misbehavior: If the child is misbehaving at the dinner table, the consequence could be that this meal ends early, even if they haven't eaten. But it wouldn't be losing tomorrow'...


29

Both in this question and in the linked question you write that this happens in the middle of the night. You seems to believe that the problem is that they are sneaking up and playing games; I think the problem is that they wake up in the middle of the night and don't go back to sleep for hours. What do you expect them to do if they are wide awake at 2am? ...


-5

In indigenous societies children older than about 6 will be learning the skills to survive in nature. Their brains are becoming ready for that, they will become sensitive to possible future problems having to do with their primary needs, like having shelter and enough food. Behavioral problems that are common in our society are extremely rare in those ...


3

To me this sounds either alike an early stage of addictive behavior - or some kind of computer obsession. As an autistic programmer myself, I can tell for certain that I've used my Super Nintendo whenever I wanted to and nobody could tell me when or how to use it (but some years elder and I had to buy everything from savings). It got particularly time-...


12

This event has brought us to the point where we can only think of some kind of "trigger event", to associate with the misbehaviour, such as physically breaking the DS in front of him. [...] We can't do much more than give them a smack and send them back to bed. I strongly recommend not to "give them a smack" (physical punishment is ...


54

Your relationship with your oldest child appears to be in a downward spiral. You seem to describe a power contest, where the only resort you have is to continuously up the punishments. This is never helpful. Something that might help: assume that kids are always trying their best. They want to succeed, and your job is both to teach them how, and to rig the ...


49

First: do not, under any circumstances, try to "trigger" them. That's a great way to end up in a reddit thread a decade or so down the line complaining about the child's mentally abusive parents - and they wouldn't be far off. Trying to "shock" them into good behavior would do nothing except make them fear you, which hopefully isn't your ...


0

Throwing food is a normal stage of development for 1 year olds. If i remember correctly it has to do with the stage of development when they realize their actions have certain outcomes. my tip is not to make a fuss about it, because then they do it more often to get a reaction. Rest assured they won't do it forever.


1

Consider baby-led weaning (Rapley & Murkett, 2011). In this method of weaning, the child is feeding herself by picking up small bite-sized pieces of solid food. The child is typically much more attentive and alert when she is in control of the feeding process, and is more interested in the food. She is also less distracted and less interested in side ...


3

Use the Kazdin method (Kazdin & Rotella, 2013): Identify the desired (positive) behavior. In your case, it is eating without throwing food. That's what you are trying to increase. Praise the desired behavior. From "Summer Review – Praise", by Alan E. Kazdin, http://alankazdin.com/summer-review-praise/ : Be specific – tell the child exactly ...


23

The good and bad news is that this is something that will almost surely pass on it's own with time. Your son is using throwing food on the floor as a way to initiate the "are you done?" interaction with you. This may be because he believes it's the right or best way to communicate this (it's been working for him so far) or because even though he ...


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