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2

What I'm doing is I keep doing whatever I want, but put the boy near me. And then I speak and explain in loud what I'm doing. "Opening eggs, mixing, boiling..." Then, he is with me. Learn to speak, to listen, I'm more focused on what I'm doing, and on him.


1

I work with people of all ages who have confidence and emotional issues and I created a valuable tool that works almost every single time: Create a situation in which yo make her feel at ease while paying attention to you. It could be a moment you are reading a book or cooking with her. Ask her about how she felt during her birthday party at the moment of ...


10

I think it's unrealistic to expect a 2 year old to be able to play by themselves for a long time. Some might, but not all. We tried the "cry it out" technique tonight but we know it'll take more than one instance to break this behavior. Is there a better approach than "cry it out" to break our son of this habit? Wanting to be with his parents ...


4

Your son wants interaction because you're the two people in the world that he cares most about. It is often boring playing on his own, and he isn't getting as much positive feedback by himself — he doesn't know if the thing he's done is worthwhile. There is no silver bullet to address anything with children because every child is different, and every child ...


2

Anecdotal: we newer got our child to play independently when we are around but grandma did. She would give him a wooden train set to play with. Then she would play with him for a while and show him how to and then tell him she would go and cook. The cooking happened around the corner in the same room. I think it was a combination of 1) the interesting toy ...


3

Toddlers are very social. We also had difficulties cooking while the children wanted to be with us. Having lots of toys and books helped somewhat. Another big help was a toy kitchen with a toy stove, sink and countertop. This, plus a set of toy plastic dishes and metal cookware and a set of plastic fruits and veggies occupied our children while we cooked. ...


2

My son went through a similar and very difficult period at daycare around the same age. Anecdotally, it seemed to be related to three factors: When he changed classes, he went from a very strong attachment with his teacher, to a teacher he didn't know and didn't 'click' with. (She was a perfectly fine teacher, they just didn't have a strong rapport, he ...


1

You are introverted Honestly this sounds more like you are an introvert than an issue with your child. I am introverted as well and I can tell you from experience that having children makes finding a balance an incredibly difficult struggle, but not impossible. Without "me" time, quiet time, and time to yourself to recharge your social meter you will ...


5

First consider that your child might have ADHD. Read about it here (search ADD and ADHD or find the tag and click on it.) If it's likely, have the child tested and take things from there as well. Mind you, I'm pretty proud of his loquacity. It sounds as though loquacity may (consciously or unconsciously) have been encouraged by you. This is no different ...


3

Generally, I find that most children, or indeed most people, are quite capable of adopting different sets of behaviors with different individuals. What I more frequently see is that children are superficially more well behaved with non-immediate family (or less comfortable expressing their true feelings, depending on how you want to look at it). So I find it ...


-1

It is usually mothers that cause this.. They do not give space to dads to have one to one time with their kids..Mothers are.more attached to their children than the opposite..


1

I strongly suggest you don't try to fight this. Your toddler will grow fast. This is just a phase. It will pass before you know it. Like most things in the early child age, it is probably better to endure and find the comedy in everything than to make an uncomfortable spectacle of your home life based on minor incidents you will almost positively forget in ...


2

Your son wants attention, your attention. It's the primal behavior of (younger) children. The only way you can take a break is by talking to the adults. If your wife plays with your son that's probably a time he won't follow. If he is left on his own he will go look for you. Some things you can do with your son (he can go color while you study). Same applies ...


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