New answers tagged

1

At that age, I wouldn't be too concerned, if this is an isolated issue. Apologizing is a complex concept. It involves recognition of a wrong, a show of remorse, an acceptance of guilt, and preferably, an intention to avoid the same mistake in the future. A lot of adults don't get apologies right (e.g. the classic "I'm sorry you find that offensive")...


0

Teach him to fight. I know that's probably not a popular answer in today's snowflake world, but I can tell you from experience, fighting back works... and usually works very fast. Bullies pick on kids because the know they can. What I mean is that they pick on kids they believe to be weaker, more docile. Once that "weak" kid is no longer ...


1

...as I’m counting he takes over the control and opts to put himself in time out... There's nothing wrong in that that I can see. If the child feels better having a bit of control over this, fine! As long as they do the time out. "Negotiating" a time out implies, to me, that they start trying to get out of doing a time out or change it in some way ...


0

After a further 2 years (my daughter is 8 now) since asking this question I can answer what we did. We persisted. For about a year, because the lessons weren't going well with me, my partner took over the lessons. I then read the book behind the Suzuki method - "Nurtured by Love" by Shinichi Suzuki. It is one of the most fantastic books I've read ...


3

You should resolve the "Entity 303"-specific issue first and only then face the more general problem of him believing to everything on YouTube. I was personally involved in a similar situation some years ago. I got pretty scared of another creepypasta from the Minecraft world (Herobrine) and didn't want to play alone. I was able to overcome this ...


6

My children are still younger and terrified of anything remotely exciting, as stories go, so we often have this conversation, that some people like sad stories, some people enjoy suspense, while others may just want to be amused. It's all entertainment and we'll have to accept that there are genres that aren't for us. I think that's all that needs to be said ...


0

At such a young age, this is not a surprising reaction, for my kids around this age they were either overly curious or scared of these situations. I agree that this is a response pattern that you do not want to reinforce, or reward, but also you cannot use force and should try to avoid bribery/rewards as a mechanism to change this behavioural / emotional ...


2

In the absence of any kind of protection from the adults who are responsible for your child’s safety/well-being while at school, the only thing YOU can do is teach your child how to protect himself. Sign your child up for self-defense classes. Whichever type you find suitable/acceptable based on your beliefs and holds your child’s interest. There are all ...


2

This is a hard one. The only thing I can suggest, other than moving your child to a better school, is to become a major pain in the butt; its the squeaky wheel that gets the grease. Keep a log of incidents. Write up what you can recall of the history, and then keep it up to date. A litany of painful incidents packs a lot more legal and emotional punch than &...


3

I occasionally resort to comparisons to the workplace, to help parents reflect on how they're seen through the child's eyes. Many adults have a boss who is an authority over them, and that is in some regards the closest thing to a parent that they can relate to. Bosses, like parents over children, to some extent decide over employees. When we're yelling, or ...


1

Firstly, I'd like to echo Graham's answer to find out why. This is the root of solving almost all complex problems. It leads to a solution which is appropriate to the problem and its actual cause. However I wanted to add a few things either I think the other answers miss or on which I disagree. On the matter one user suggested of having a cookie after ...


1

A six year old is too young to have developed strong prejudices, and young enough to be confronted with new things every day. Therefore you should talk to the parents to make sure you don't step onto their toes, and unless they are strictly against it, you tell the kids the truth. So if you are a transgender woman, you would say that you are a woman. If they ...


0

Is someone in his life yelling at him when he has difficulties? Because that would cause him to react that way. "I'm maybe a little harsh on the kid telling him to just suck it up and keep going" That person doesn't happen to be you does it? Do not take his having difficulty personally. "...but the other family members are not as harsh on ...


4

If you are helping with homework during the Covid-19 stay-in-place, that is not mentioned and also may be a big contributor with anxiety that your child is experiencing in addition to the push to do homework. Parents need to step back during the pandemic and lessen the stress on children, not add to it. As an advocate for disabled students for over 25 years, ...


12

I’m gobsmacked. I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that perhaps in your efforts to be concise you were a little harsh on the way you portrayed yourself? Ok, firstly, homework at age 6? Yes, absolutely, it’s about learning good habits and demonstrating what he’s learned in class, and it should also be about bonding with loving parents over time ...


5

It is always worth discovering if there is a real reason for fear. It's possible this is not oversensitivity but a reaction to some past event. Do you remember when the behaviour started? Was it immediately, the first time homework was assigned? Or was it after the homework was first submitted? Adults can sometimes unwittingly use phrases that work for one ...


7

Well, here's some things for you to think about - a few slaps to warm your ears. Firstly, from your description it seems that you are far too harsh with your son, and you seem unempathetic. A child needs to know that their parent love and respect them, and that they can come to you with any problem at all and find comfort and understanding - and possibly ...


41

Find out why The first thing to do is to find out why he's running away and crying. I am deeply concerned that no-one in your family has apparently even thought to ask him that. If you had, then I would have expected to see that as a major part of your question. If in fact you have, then please edit your question to give us this crucial information. And if ...


2

Ask the teacher to give you one good reason based on sound pedagogical science why he/she is assigning homework to very young children? Hint: there isn't one. Then tell them you won't force yours to do it because it's not developmentally appropriate. Honestly, this breaks my heart. He's running away because it's hurting him. One thing I'd like to add as a ...


0

Maybe leave him with his biological dad for a week under some pretext of an emergency. He will be quickly disillusioned of him. At six, kids are much more judgmental and see things in black and white. You always acting cool and trying to emphasize the "grey" makes matters worse. Instead of the "grey", he sees it as "white" and ...


9

I think you should take a step back and perhaps put yourself in your son's shoes. As a six year old, his highest priority isn't these assignments. It's playing. It's running around and jumping or hanging out with his friends at a park. A mental shift has to occur to get in the mindset for doing schoolwork and it won't happen for a while - years even. This is ...


38

Your child is six years old, and what you’re describing is a normal, developmentally appropriate reaction. Your job as the parent is to help him learn how to approach difficult tasks, by being supportive and positive, by modeling good strategies, and most importantly by never dismissing his feelings. He feels like it is too hard, and that is okay; the ...


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