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When my daughter was about 4, I started driving home the position that actions have consequences. If she accidentally hurts me during roughhousing, a "sorry" is typically enough to defer the consequences. However, if she continues to do so intentionally (or even borderline maliciously), I start to refuse to play that particular game with her, ...


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Thank you for the helpful answers. For anyone who is wondering about this for themselves, I post how this worked out for us. I stopped lifting based on the feedback I received here and put him back on diapers at night. Also, I didn't proactively encourage him to stay dry by any other method. Around the age of four he started to stay dry at nights on his own. ...


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It's pretty clear to me that the boy's behavior isn't about the dog. It's about YOU. He's testing boundaries and trying to see what he can get away with, and has discovered that hurting the dog pushes your buttons in a big way (understandable). It's an endless well of interaction with you! You need to stop with the 20-30 no-real-consequence reminders a ...


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I think demanding an apology is generally a terrible idea. An apology should convey that you understand that you have, and are sorry for having, wronged someone. You cannot force someone to feel that way, and without true meaning, the words "I'm sorry" have no inherent value. I wouldn't want to teach that an apology is something you can give ...


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