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I might just be showcasing my ignorance about the topic (gifted children), but I'd like to propose a frame challenge for your question. Why do you need to know so early? I second the accepted answers that it might be too early to tell. As you also are saying, it might be too early to disentangle the effects of early, loving exposure and her liking of the ...


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Consult with a developmental pediatrician and have him evaluated by an occupational therapist. If there is an issue, it is best to catch it at an early age.


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If your country (Italy) does not have resources for testing and teaching gifted children, consider checking out the neighboring countries. There are other countries in Europe, including Italy's neighbors France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia, that have resources for testing and teaching gifted children (Mönks and Pflüger, 2005), see below. There are ...


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Firstly, no "distracting" activities will help him "outgrow" what is potentially ASD. If your son has ASD, he will not outgrow it. You need to know that no matter what you do it is not your fault or under your control whether your child is on the spectrum, but as a parent you can help accommodate your child to help him navigate the world. ...


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At 20 months, my oldest was like yours - very physical. So, the main thing I did with him was to take him outside to play. Running around, climbing on the playground, climbing stairs; all of this within reasonable safety limits, though often a bit outside what others were comfortable with, but I knew my son's limits and how careful he was. Obviously this ...


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I’m a big fan of child led learning, and by that I mean let the child find what interests her and do that. Are you worried she’s not developing right? If so, ask her pediatrician. Otherwise, she will decide to stand (and then walk) when she decides that she has a reason to do so! Let her do what’s interesting for her, and trust that she’ll get around to ...


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I think that setting a limit, or even a goal to a babies carb intake is much more likely to cause damage than benefit. The amount of food that a person needs differs very much from person to person, some people eat twice as much as others without getting too heavy. With babies the difference is even much bigger, because they grow in phases and because the ...


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For 1-year-old children, the adequate intake is 95 grams per day of carbohydrates (which includes both complex carbohydrates and sugars), according to USDA. This also includes 5 grams of fiber per day. There are no specific USDA guidelines for sugars that I could find. Note that 1-year-olds get sugars mostly from breast milk or formula, and, to a lesser ...


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