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2

I am in a very similar situation we live in a 1.5 bedroom apt, my younger daughter is 17 months old breastfeeding and co-sleeping. We have really started to enforce weaning and getting her in a crib to sleep, as a result she is waking up less and is better rested in the morning. My wife will breastfeed her at bed time (approx the same time every night), ...


5

Evidence seems to suggest a genetic component in both aggressiveness and access to self control. So that would suggest no. I don't have a reference at hand, but I know Steven Pinker argues in The Blank Slate that in the nature / nurture divide, parents provide almost only nature, and that influence from environment stem largely from age-matched peers. In ...


1

Maybe a late answer but i hope this give some insights to people reading this question I think the most important thing for your son to get more sleep is reduce the number of times he is fed. At age of 1 it is not uncommon for a kid to get 6-7 "feeding times" a day and none during the night. What worked for our son is that we made his last feeding larger (...


0

I think your "friend" is well out of order here. I understand people can go over the top with "discipline" but to take the exact opposite approach and not even try to address and correct that kind of behaviour is pretty lousy parenting. Two year olds can't really be reasoned with, that kind of stuff doesn't kick in for another couple of years but they do ...


4

Your kid has reached the age where children grow independent and adults get defiant. It is incomprehensible to me why you'd decide to put stubborn a two year old. Your taking what was an interaction between an adult and a toddler, and turning it into an interaction between two toddlers albeit with a power imbalance. I think standing your ground is terrible ...


2

I recommend using the Kazdin method (Kazdin & Rotella, 2013) instead of going back right after the tantrum to make the child do what you think necessary (which increases the likelihood of the tantrum). The child could still be in the "hot" (too emotional) state. Soon after the tantrum is usually not the best time to teach, offer rational arguments and ...


2

In practice this usually involves him sitting on a naughty step until he is done. Well, for one, I'd stop calling it the "naughty" step. Call it the "calm down" step. Once the tantrum has been dealt with, I go back to the disobedience. So if the disobedience is outstanding (i.e. he hasn't done whatever it was and it still needs to be done) then he ...


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Rewards Classically, you explain the rule to your kid and give them a reward every time they get it right. When you feel that the trigger is "embodied", you slowly but surely suppress rewards. The link between trigger and reflex disappears but the reflex stays: the trigger is learnt. Technically speaking, it's called classical conditioning (and no, it does ...


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