New answers tagged

3

This is a normal, age appropriate behavior. He'll get better with time and practice. As scary as it is, gagging from over filling his mouth is how he learns about appropriate bite size and chewing. It was frequent experience when my child was that age, and still sometimes happens, although far less often as he got older, and is rare now at 3. For my son, ...


0

One thing to keep in mind that will help you not get frustrated with the child is that children biting at that age are not (usually) biting to hurt someone - most often it's biting to soothe the gums or fill another sensory need. I found some great biting toys (like this one) on Amazon that helped my toddler stop biting. Also, it showed people that I'm ...


4

Sounds like you have your answer. Guide her! She clearly already knows how to tell, she's just going through a phase - assuming there's no medical issue related to this, but it seems likely that would appear in the kindergarten as well if there were. (But, always consider phoning your pediatrician when things like this change just in case.) Set up a ...


-1

I really want to second dxh's answer, as I feel it's by far the best in this case. If your child has regularly handled video chats in the past without issue then I suspect the problem is not the video chat themselves. I suspect the covid-19 and quarantine is hard for her, the change of her normal, what's expected, and who she can visit can be confusing and ...


3

I've traveled with my son a few times between ages 1 - 2.5, some of them one-adult trips, although all were before covid-19. It's tough but doable. I did talk to my son about what would be involved in the trip-- going through the security, getting on the plane, sitting in our seats, going up in the air, etc. I think it was helpful to some extent, but ...


1

My daughter also went through exactly this at 2.5 years old. I remember opening the drawer with her shirts in it and asking her to pick a top. She would take one, immediately put it back, take another, put that one back, etc.… I would finally say, “Pick one or I will.” After another minute of this, I would end up picking one… whereupon she would cry out in ...


7

In America, this is referred to as "The Terrible Twos". You just got to start early, while some kids don't hit it until they're three or so. It's pretty normal behavior for kids that age. They don't understand the concept of sharing, fair play, or being nice. It's all about "What's mine is mine, what's yours is mine, anything I see is mine, I ...


14

This feels like very normal behaviour for an only child of 17 months; and the paediatrician is right that socialisation will solve most of the issues. That said, you're the parents, so while it's the school's job to handle this when the child is in their care, it's your job by default. To be honest, all you're seeing here is the standard impulse control ...


22

When a child does something that makes another child feel bad, whether violence or just selfish behavior (which is basically what you're describing), my go-to at any age is to show the child how the other child feels. Ask her to look at the other child's face, which is presumably sad, and point out why. This does two things. It helps to emphasize the ...


0

Poor quality sleep could be the immediate cause of this behavior. Has anything changed recently that may have affected sleep? Any recent changes in room temperature, noise, light? Any changes in the diet, such as lunch? Any changes in clothing (too itchy) or laundry detergent or fabric softener? Any new scary books or TV programs? Any recent other changes to ...


5

That is a phase like any other; I don't have an English-language reference on hand but I've seen it described in Isabelle Filliozat's "J'ai tout essayé", which is about child behavior and discipline between 1 and 5 years old. In that section she describes giving a child a choice of two pastries to buy at the store, and them choosing one, but then ...


1

Anytime there's a change in routine, it can be expected that a regression can occur. This would hold true even if you weren't traveling, but simply getting back to a regular routine of school/work, activities and home. Also there are a lot more distractions out and about than at home where everything is status quo. I would set a little reminder on your phone ...


1

My daughter who is now almost 3 used to cry every time we blew into a toy flute that we had when she was really small. She would blow into it all the time without an issue, but as soon as someone else did it would trigger something to instantly make her cry. As time went on, she forgot about the flute and found it again about a year later. She now loves it ...


5

Every kid is different, so this may not work in your case, but I got my (almost) four year old son to wear a mask (now required in my area for children over two) by turning it into a bit of a dress-up game. For example, my son LOVES Spider-Man and Batman, so I bought myself a Spider-Man themed mask and my son a black Batman mask for his eyes and a black ...


6

Unexplained/seemingly random toddler phobias are extremely common, and particularly with children that are more anxious or sensitive in general. I know of one small child who would cry hysterically when hearing anyone sing the Happy Birthday song, while my own son at a similar age was incredibly averse to anything with a motor noise like the vacuum, ...


8

Your comment that prior to the lockdown your child did enjoy these calls suggests to me that this is a reaction to the social distancing. Think of it, if you will, as seeing them on a screen being too painful a reminder of what she's missing out on, or as her rejecting a perceived attempt to substitute physical closeness with a video chat. I might be wrong ...


14

My kids (8 and 7) have gone in and out of interest of video chatting with Grandma (who they love seeing in person) over the years. We've not really stressed about it too much; we did at first, and then realized it wasn't always going to work out - and all parties learned to be okay with it, basically. To avoid adding too much stress, we just call Grandma ...


29

Calling someone or video-chatting is a quite abstract form of communication, and I would guess that her verbal skills are still rather limited, which makes a bilateral communication via screen challenging. She won’t realize the nice parts about having at least a semblance of social interaction. It took my kids a decade to independently talk with family via ...


5

Could you get one of the masks with a headband and clear plastic screen, and pretend it's a 'space helmet'? https://medworx.co.uk/


7

Are you wearing yourself? There is usually no problem to persuade children to do what both parents consistently do. Also you can simply explain what: She is unlikely to get sick seriously but she might bring virus to her parents who may. Talks that masks are not useful have been spread because of the need to reserve them for the healthcare workers (source). ...


22

The illusion of choice and of being in control are powerful with kids this age. Don't ask, or tell, her to put on a mask. Present her with a few different masks and ask her which one she wants you to wear. Then ask her which one she wants to wear.


24

In my experience, if the objection is due to the typical dislike of change, then simply being persistent and leading by example will win the day. Make it clear that she cannot go out if she does not have a mask, and be gentle but firm, reminding her why it's important - "This mask will protect you from getting sick, and will protect everyone around you ...


0

I finally found an answer to this, it seems like children under the age of 6-7 years old don't connect future consequences with their actions. https://www.baysideprimarycare.com/Discipline-and-Your-Child For children younger than 6 or 7 years, withholding privileges works best if done right away. For example, if your child misbehaves in the morning, do ...


3

Welcome to having a toddler. It's a lot of fun, but it does come with certain ... complications. This is one of them, and it happens for pretty much everyone. First: this is, to some extent, a phase. He's now able to move around and do things he wasn't able to before; so he's exploring that new freedom, and all of the stuff that comes with it. Be ...


1

My 13 year-old still doesn't respond to consequences that aren't pretty much immediate. At this point, he probably never will. Same for non-immediate rewards. After a while, trying to use incentives like that just felt mean. My 10 year-old does consider future incentives, but she doesn't really need them. You generally just have to set expectations with her....


5

TL;DR: Talk to your child often about their feelings and give them a rich emotional vocabulary/lexicon. Four years of age is a good time to start teaching a child to learn to handle their emotions themselves in socially appropriate ways. As you so poignantly pointed out, many people don't do this. In fact, the majority of adults often don't manage their ...


2

First, the best way to teach a child to handle his emotions isn't external consequences (i.e., punishment), but taking the time to teach him how to handle his emotions for their own sake. If he's upset and hitting you, taking away his television or making him lose some other privilege won't teach him to handle his emotions properly: it will teach him to ...


2

She had a serious regression, where she would take off her diaper and soil on the floor quietly Well, she's learned not to go in her diaper, which is good. She has the basic principle. Does she have her own potty, or is she using the toilet? Maybe she has sensory issues around the toilet? Too big, or too uncomfortable, or too loud when it flushes? ...


0

Great question! I have a 2 1/2-year-old and I am currently focusing on acting immediately after the behavior occurs. As far as a general rule, tbh I am going with the flow and seeing how far in the future I can I give a promise as a reward. As an example: if I make mention that if she behaves at her grandparent's house, I will promise her a popsicle when we ...


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