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Our baby is 7 months old, we never had any major problems in feeding him but in latest month, he is refusing almost to drink any milk or water. Currently he is drinking probably around just 20-30 ml a day.

Baby looks healthy and behaves normally and is putting on weight. Currently we are adding some water in his food.

I would like to know:

  • Do you have any ideas why he has this behavior?
  • How to help him to drink more liquid?
  • Could be connected with toothache?
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Some babies do refuse the bottle because it hurts. If your doctor is not concerned, adding liquids to food sounds like a good idea. There is a lot of info out there -- just Google "teething baby won't drink" and you'll get lots of information.

I understand this is scary, but your medical professional can help. Please do not allow dehydration to be a problem -- go to the doctor if you suspect dehydration,

Livestrong

Dehydration and Teething in an Infant by ELIZABETH WOLFENDEN
Jul 26, 2011: Dehydration and Teething in an Infant The teething process can cause infants a great deal of pain. Sometimes the pain is so intense that infants refuse to feed, which puts them at a greater risk of developing dehydration. Dehydration occurs when an infant takes in less water than the amount leaving his body. Since getting early treatment for infant dehydration is important, you should take the time to learn how to spot the signs of dehydration so you can seek treatment when necessary.

Signs of Teething

When your baby begins to feel a tooth coming in, he may be fussier than usual. Some babies may simply whine a bit more than usual, while others may be much more vocal. Babies who are teething often gnaw on whatever they can get their hands on, which may include their own fingers or toes, their toys or even you. You may notice that your infant wakes more often during the night, has bulging gums or is drooling more than usual. Infants may also develop a low-grade fever, diarrhea or a cough when they are teething. Some babies refuse to nurse or bottle-feed, since the sucking pressure may worsen their teething pain. Refusing to nurse or bottle-feed may lead to dehydration.

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