Hot answers tagged

62

Yes. Five years old is way too old for a stroller. I personally think a five-year-old should be completely stroller free, not just almost. Humans are animals, just like all other animals that roam the Earth and we were given two legs to use. As such, not using them for their intended purpose leads to atrophy, decay, and laziness. Walking is exercise thus ...


18

I've used them until what ever age we found them useful, same with carrying my kids. If your child is constantly asking, then I'd get a health checkup. Children by that age, in a fun place, will nearly always prefer the freedom of walking. I was only ever asked to push or carry if they were tired & we had a long way to go. While others have said, ...


17

Unless she needs them to protect her feet, never. In the words of the AAP: "Style is the only reason for a baby to wear shoes at all until the child begins walking outdoors or is taken out in cold weather." First, the idea that her feet will get too big is somewhere between ignorant and harmful. Wearing correctly-sized shoes will not prevent foot growth. ...


13

I don't think you're going to find a list of 'age appropriate distances', because it's so variable by kid. My not-yet-three year old can sometimes walk two miles plus with no problem, while I suspect the average two to three year old cannot. From a physical point of view, the biggest dangers are short-term (exhaustion, dehydration), and long-term (damage ...


12

Assuming your child's shoes fit well you will not cause foot problems by occasionally going on long hikes. (If her shoes are too tight, you might worsen problems like hammertoe, bunions, and so on, but the walking alone won't cause such problems and the real cause is the shoe.) Fatigue, blisters, and sore legs are temporary issues. The permanent changes you ...


12

I had taken a 'children camp carer` course a few years ago. They said there that while children can often walk a long distance - and are even willing to do it, they will suffer consequences of such strain in the evening or the day after. They supposedly may experience extreme tiredness, apathy, headaches, nausea and/or diarrhea. On the other hand, my ...


12

One way to look at this is to ask the alternative - would you have to carry her? If you are okay with carrying, then doing away with the stroller may be a good idea. But remember 5 year olds can get quite heavy after a few miles. My wife and I quite liked rucksack carriers for ours - reasonably comfy, and spread the load across the shoulders, so we could ...


9

You may have tried this already... get some toys/games that require her to stand up in order to play with them. One example would be a "music table" which has different buttons to push, levers to pull and things to spin around, each causing the toy to make different sounds and/or play music. In order to access each individual gizmo, she'll have to walk ...


8

While falling and getting hurt are part of learning to walk. Here are a few tips that may help: She needs furniture without sharp edges to pull up on and help her balance. Keep a close eye on her to prevent her grabbing onto unsafe or unstable surfaces. A carpeted surface (short nap so it doesn't trip her) is a softer landing spot than ceramic tiles. Keep ...


8

Watch her and catch her when you can, and comfort her when you don't. Learn how to judge the severity of the fall. Generally, if she cries, the fall isn't too bad. If she is groggy and does not respond, then you need to contact a doctor. Also carefully monitor the state of your child after a fall to make sure her condition returns to normal. If anything ...


7

Actually walking at six months is highly unusual, but "cruising", or walking holding on to furniture, is less so. The Denver II indicates that 25% of seven month olds can walk holding onto furniture (and while that test is controversial to use for diagnostic purposes, it can be useful to get a broad idea of when stages are likely to occur). My oldest ...


7

One of my 4 year old twins "doesn't have any strength left" whenever he is told to do something he doesn't want to. This will disappear the moment he's distracted by something or someone he does like, just like your son. He may be feeling this physically or not, but it definitely starts in the mind. For my son, it's most often that he was deeply engaged in ...


5

It's an interesting question and one we discuss often in our home. My kids and I have just returned home from our longest walk here in Sydney so far. My wife and I have been walking with the kids since they were born (actually right through both pregnancies) and before they could walk - on my back for probably thousands of kms. Now when given the option, ...


5

My 7 year old just completed a half marathon on Saturday, to raise money for her friend's charity, as it is one which doesn't get much attention. And this was all Lexie's idea - we just supported her. In training, she has walked between 10 and 13 miles each weekend with her mother, and on Saturday after the half marathon she then ran around a park with ...


5

Well, I think it might be better if you could accept it, because she's just being a kid - I think you understand that, but it just pushes your buttons. My kids push my buttons, they like to throw books on the floor and then needle the books with their feet. I just pick the books up and die a little inside ;) To me the 'risk' you run, is her digging her ...


5

The best thing to do is to stop trying to help, and stop anyone else who may be around from trying to help too. That doesn't mean don't engage with them or play with them but that they just don't need the distraction. Also fixating on it can become a problem. Stop being there to catch them, they're probably picking up from a parent that falling down is ...


5

I have a few suggestions, and from how his behaviour is described when he sees his friends, there isn't an issue at school. It seems like he just doesn't want to walk, but instead of getting it done he wants to resist the activity. Bribery rarely fails; Children are usually very happy with even the simplest of rewards and little/often is the key. I can ...


5

I'll add to SomeShinyObject's mention of disability because I have specific experience of a non-obvious medical condition that can cause this issue in older children. If she has lower body hypertone, or hyper flexibility, and it can be quite subtle, she may be genuinely suffering after a while. This isn't a judgement you can make purely on the basis of age; ...


5

This may be normal for your child, but it may not be; we can't say. For that reason, I recommend speaking about this with her primary care provider, who can see the whole picture. This PDF is a chart in common use as a quick first look at developmental milestones in language, social skills, fine motor skills, and gross motor skills. If you look at the 15 ...


5

I’m a big fan of child led learning, and by that I mean let the child find what interests her and do that. Are you worried she’s not developing right? If so, ask her pediatrician. Otherwise, she will decide to stand (and then walk) when she decides that she has a reason to do so! Let her do what’s interesting for her, and trust that she’ll get around to ...


4

There are two types of walkers: the roam free kind ( baby on the loose!) and the "stationary" kind where the baby can only go around a center post. First, we'll look at the "roam free" breed. Pro's: 1) babies LOVE these walkers! 2) They are pretty easy to transport from one room to another (in fact, baby will usually just follow you), 3) these are ...


4

Short answer is yes, but that is not a hard yes all the time. I have a 5-year-old child who still occasionally begs to ride in the stroller when we go out. Usually I just say no, even if his younger brother is getting a ride. Sometimes I allow it. If I allow my 5-year-old to ride in the stroller (we have a two-seat stroller), it is usually if one of two ...


4

If your child has reverted to cruising and crawling, you're probably right that something happened to make him more cautious, though that's a bit surprising, as toddlers who fall usually don't much care, just getting up and trying again. You might ask of the daycare folks if your little one had a significant fall while there, and explain that he's likely to ...


3

Do you wear shoes indoors? If so, perhaps the baby should too. I would choose very soft shoes, moccasins or slippers. Nothing hard-soled or stiff sided. Whatever "support" a foot or ankle needs should come from a child's own muscles and ligaments. If, like me, you don't wear shoes inside your home, then get the baby some shoes and keep them by the front ...


3

I have a 13 month old daughter who has been sitting perfectly since approximately 6 months, but she refuses to crawl, walk, or even stand either at furniture or with my support. She recently had her 1 year review with the health visitor who has advised me that this is nothing to worry about as long as she is developing appropriately in other ways (i.e., ...


3

Push walkers acctually delay walking. The child is not balancing on their own and instead of spening time crawling, which helps develope balance in a natural way, they are soending time relying on a push toy, wagon, or walker. The best way to encourage walking is to give your child lots of tummy time. Do not help them sit up, let them figure it out when they ...


3

Baby walkers are dangerous and harmful. They are dangerous because the child suddenly has a lot more access to dangerous items. They are harmful because the child is using an unnatural foot position which risks damaging the Achilles tendon.


3

Please consult you paediatrician before buying one. When my son was 6 months he was already trying to stand up. We loved to play with him holding him up and helping him "walk". I've taken him to an orthopaedist due to an unrelated problem and told him about it. He told us not to do it. That when the child tried to stand up supporting somewhere, we should ...


3

Walking is not something that needs you to 'push', unless your child is substantially behind (and 11 months is ahead, not behind). Looking at the Denver Developmental Screening chart, the 50th percentile is around 12 months, and many children take until 13 to 15 months to walk. In my opinion, you're better off continuing as you have: give your child the ...


3

He doesn't walk yet because he's still gaining his balance. It's normal. Any time before two years old is perfectly normal. My eldest started at 20 months, and her sister at 12, and they're both fine. The only advice any parent needs before the child is two is this: Relax, and let them get there in their own time. Then relax some more.


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