Hot answers tagged

129

Since you're talking about church, I take it religious beliefs should be on topic here. There are two commandments that supersede (and contain) all the others. One of them is You shall love your neighbor as yourself. If you have not put yourself in the shoes of the other parents, their children, and the nursery staff, that is where you should start. ...


100

From everything that I can find online, it is a positive thing to show affection in front of your kids. It models affection to your children, and it makes them feel more secure https://www.whattoexpect.com/news/first-year/how-much-pda-okay-front-baby-kids/ My own experience agrees with what I have read. I don't think I ever even saw my father and mother ...


73

Summary Grapes are round and larger than a child's airway and may lead to occlusion. Food with a smooth, deformable surface can form a tight seal. Grapes are "the third most common cause of food-related fatal choking episodes". Children below 5 years of age don't chew as good yet. Grapes should be cut up for children. This is mostly about grapes, not ...


66

I don't like using strength or force to do things, and I am afraid to cause fear or trauma on my little one This dislike of using force speaks for you. However, in this case, it might be the only thing that is guaranteed to be sucessfull in getting her to take her medicine, and it's in her interest, even if she doesn't understand it. This is what parents ...


39

If anything I believe it would be positive, although I don't know of any studies on the subject. Children learn how to be adults from the adults around them, so seeing what real romantic relationships are like can only be a good thing. Two caveats: What happens if they copy you while playing house? That should give you a clear idea of where to draw the ...


32

Let her moan, cry, and delay the inevitable, showing respect for her feelings, but set a timer for these activities. When the timer goes off, it's time to take the medicine. Refusing medicine necessary to get better is not an option, just like playing in traffic is not an option. But respecting her feelings about it is an option. The following is a very ...


28

Those providing child minding services have a duty of care to all the children in their charge. It is entirely reasonable that any child pushing or pulling the hair of another child be removed from that environment. Hopefully this phase will not last long. In the mean time, consider that your child needs to learn how to appropriately interact with other ...


13

About 1 in 10 children discover masturbation before puberty. And the majority of those discover it in infancy or as toddlers. It is almost never a sign of abuse or sexual misconduct, and there is no research that suggests that this is unhealthy or that it leads to longterm mental or sexual damage of any sort. I know it seems counterintuitive, but it seems to ...


13

I won't repeat the already existing, good, answers, but here are a few other options. Let them forget they're fighting you If a toddler has it in their mind to be contrary it's hard to get anything done with them; but luckily toddler's forget what they're doing pretty quickly. Sometimes just leaving the subject alone for a minute, while distracting them ...


12

It sounds like your son is given a mobile phone or put in front of the TV because the adults around him don't find the time to engage with him. Your problem is only fixable if you fix this. You need to provide an alternative to the mobile and TV. Spend more time playing with your son, reading to your son, looking at picture books with him etc. This may be ...


10

As far as I understand your are struggling with several things at the same time. If I read you correctly... After a long day at work you want to disconnect for some time You are concerned that your kid is watching to much TV You want to catch up with what happened in the world during the day You also feel bad as you don't spend too much time with your kid ...


8

I don't live in Sydney, but I live in New Zealand which has similar cultural standards. I think it is perfectly fine to let a child play in a fountain park with just a nappy on. I even occasionally see children playing in a fountain park with nothing at all on. There are a couple of things to consider: A regular nappy is going to absorb water like crazy, ...


8

While every child is different, most 3-year-olds are not ready to independently initiate and perform cleanup tasks. Instead, success is often found when a routine is established with a cheerful adult. When playtime is over or when you are changing activities, start doing cleanup with your son. Say "alright, we're done with this, so let's put it away," and ...


8

Here are a few more. Of course none of these work for every situation. Explain things ahead of time. At breakfast "We're going to the shops this morning.". Then later on "We're going to the shops in five minutes." This lets the child have some sense of a plan. Without it stuff just seems to happen at random, pulling them this way and that without warning. ...


8

There is a great answer here but I would just add my thought. I would go to the church nursery and probably other places like playgroups. Keep an eye on your child, play and stop him every time while saying "don't hit" or "don't throw". After a while, (hopefully) the child will learn what is appropriate behavior. We had to repeat a good amount of time with ...


8

The birth of a child is an occasion where family often will pull out the stops to help, my mother and sister each came from NYC to London for a week and a half after my second was born, giving my wife and I 3 weeks of help, which was great. So you might want to have that conversation with them, there may be someone who would be happy to take the time. ...


7

My reaction tends to depend on my child's reaction. In the case you explain, it sounds like the pushing was relatively minor, and your daughter doesn't seem to have been too bothered by it. In that case I probably don't make a big deal out of it either - she presumably learned that the other child didn't like her touching their scooter, but beyond that is ...


7

You're trying to convince your child that TV is not good, while you sit and watch TV yourself. That's not going to work. You need to practice what you preach. If you want him to watch less TV, then you need to do the same. Instead of feeling guilty and giving him the mobile, you could try just turning off the tv and spending quality time with him, playing ...


7

Dr. David's 4 steps: Feel it. Don't try to push away your child's negative emotions, but validate them. Show It. Directed against rules about hiding some emotions, like "Boys don't cry." Label It. Enable children to name or otherwise identify emotions (the older they get, the more you can talk about it.) Watch It Go. Teaching them that emotions ...


7

I took a different approach but probably not very different in age with my kids. I left an ipad in plain sight and let them do whatever they wanted with it. It had restrictions for in app purchases, but left open otherwise and treated as though it was exactly what an ipad is - useless garbage. I'm exaggerating a little, but in my experience the tablets ...


7

Parent: "It's time to take your medicine." Kid: "Charlie should not take medicine." Parent: "No it's time to take medicine. First we'll take the medicine, then we can go do < fun activity>." Kid: "Charlie should not." Parent: "You can take your medicine, or you can go to time out." Kid: "No medicine, no time out." Parent: "Okay, time-out it is. Wait ...


6

My question here is that in such situations should I: pretend to be deaf and blind and let the toddler learn the lesson that everyone may not be friendly towards her even if she is towards them? or jump in the situation to heal the toddler's hurt feelings? In this particular situation, you encouraged your child to say hello to the boy and ...


6

You might try the "cleanup" song, and singing with him as you help put toys away. That has always worked with preschoolers in my experience. When my son was younger, we had a one toy at a time rule and had all of his toys in open bins. That always helped unless we had a mob of kids over, in which case we always helped cleanup after.


6

At 3 that is a very tricky demand. He almost certainly will be tired after playing, so that won't be just an excuse. So you may find that until he is older you just need to tidy yourself - this is part of parenting responsibilities until the child is old enough (Even at 16 it can be an issue...) One of the ways that seems to get most success around that age ...


6

To directly answer your question, here are some statistics. This childproofing checklist seems about right to me in terms of age. 3-5yo are old enough to usually not swallow things inappropriately, depending on the child, but not to always behave in that regard. So I'd set a minimum age target of 5; and I'd point out that children develop differently, so ...


6

The other answers give great points of view, I just want to add an important fact: Kids will see a lot of adult behavior in media and around them Kids will be exposed to a lot of input on behavior. The most important one will usually be of their parents. But they will also sometimes see things on TV, the internet, talk with other children or just see ...


6

Does the child go to daycare/school during the week? If so, see if they give him free reign and allow the behavior you are trying to correct. I don't think the church is out to get you or anything, but they are likely frustrated if this is the norm on your child's part. I would set up a meeting with the pastor, talk about everything and see what can be done ...


6

I'm sort-of sorry for the answer I'm going to give, but mostly I think it's justified. Discipline your child. He's not behaving like an unruly little monster ONLY in church daycare, I guarantee it; he's doing these things at home, too, and you're obviously letting him get away with it, otherwise he'd know not to do them. I'm not, by any means, saying you're ...


5

You are not the first (set of) parent(s) to use too much screen time to entertain a child, and you won't be the last. The problem is that it works, and for tired or stressed parents, it's like a "pause" button: it stops the child from demanding something. However, that much screen time is not good for the child, a fact I think you're aware of. To get a ...


5

Use a PVR to record the news, then watch it after your kid is asleep. Added bonus: you get to fast-forward the commercials. Now that you’re not watching TV, there are many things you can do with your child. Anything from colouring, to building, to some simple board games, to story telling, to arithmetic, ... really, the sky’s the limit. Or you could get out ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible