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128

Since you're talking about church, I take it religious beliefs should be on topic here. There are two commandments that supersede (and contain) all the others. One of them is You shall love your neighbor as yourself. If you have not put yourself in the shoes of the other parents, their children, and the nursery staff, that is where you should start. ...


55

We're fortunate to have somewhat older children, who need only short attention bursts followed by longer periods of working independently. However, with a 14 month old, you're not going to get that! What several couples that I work with have done is split the time of the day up between them. For example, one couple who both work at my office and have a ...


41

Don’t worry. I have 3 kids who are now fluent in 3 languages... When the youngest was learning to count we were giving her the numbers in either of two languages - because she was also at nursery where she only got one language. One day she was asked to count so she did in French. Then her brother asked her to count in English - she did and then it seemed ...


30

Calling someone or video-chatting is a quite abstract form of communication, and I would guess that her verbal skills are still rather limited, which makes a bilateral communication via screen challenging. She won’t realize the nice parts about having at least a semblance of social interaction. It took my kids a decade to independently talk with family via ...


27

Those providing child minding services have a duty of care to all the children in their charge. It is entirely reasonable that any child pushing or pulling the hair of another child be removed from that environment. Hopefully this phase will not last long. In the mean time, consider that your child needs to learn how to appropriately interact with other ...


27

This happens often and they will sort it. As you say they are always happy to see you so it is not something that lasts long with them. Have you tried telling them “Nana has to go shopping now and will see you later (or tomorrow) ” or other simple reasons. Had this when dropping kids off at nursery. Tough for a week or so then they got used to it - it’s ...


24

To add to Joe's excellent answer: One option I occasionally found helpful is what I'd call babysitting by video chat (or video conference). In our case, there are many people who have free time to look after children, but who cannot do so in person, because of the contact restrictions in place - grandparents in particular. In that situation, a video chat ...


24

In my experience, if the objection is due to the typical dislike of change, then simply being persistent and leading by example will win the day. Make it clear that she cannot go out if she does not have a mask, and be gentle but firm, reminding her why it's important - "This mask will protect you from getting sick, and will protect everyone around you ...


22

My husband and I work at home and have a two year old. We Have found the following to work really well for us. Setup a safe play area. We have a play area right by our office that is completely childproof and as large as we can make it in the space. Our daughter is happy to play here by herself. Depending on the day it can be between 30 min or 1.5 hours (...


22

The illusion of choice and of being in control are powerful with kids this age. Don't ask, or tell, her to put on a mask. Present her with a few different masks and ask her which one she wants you to wear. Then ask her which one she wants to wear.


22

When a child does something that makes another child feel bad, whether violence or just selfish behavior (which is basically what you're describing), my go-to at any age is to show the child how the other child feels. Ask her to look at the other child's face, which is presumably sad, and point out why. This does two things. It helps to emphasize the ...


22

This is a normal, age appropriate behavior. He'll get better with time and practice. As scary as it is, gagging from over filling his mouth is how he learns about appropriate bite size and chewing. It was frequent experience when my child was that age, and still sometimes happens, although far less often as he got older, and is rare now at 3. For my son, ...


21

We didn't have the exact same issue, but for what it's worth, before our 3 year old could make it through the night on her own, there were several months where we carried her to the toilet when we went to bed, a couple of hours into her sleep. We would put her on the toilet, and she would go, and we could carry her back to bed without waking her up. From ...


16

kids are very different so there is no single answer that would be the right one. A few suggestions are: make sure he drinks enough early in the evening, not directly before going to bed. make sure he uses the bathroom before going to bed (even if he says he does not need to, make it a routine, it is fine if only little comes out). If he does not want to ...


16

Fear of separation is something most parents will be familiar with. If it happens to you too, I can only read that as a sign that your relationship to them is working. Yes, it's heart breaking to all of us, but it'd be far worse, I think, if they didn't care whether we left. You can help them with their anxiety by introducing play into your departure, to ...


15

This feels like very normal behaviour for an only child of 17 months; and the paediatrician is right that socialisation will solve most of the issues. That said, you're the parents, so while it's the school's job to handle this when the child is in their care, it's your job by default. To be honest, all you're seeing here is the standard impulse control ...


14

I won't repeat the already existing, good, answers, but here are a few other options. Let them forget they're fighting you If a toddler has it in their mind to be contrary it's hard to get anything done with them; but luckily toddler's forget what they're doing pretty quickly. Sometimes just leaving the subject alone for a minute, while distracting them ...


14

My kids (8 and 7) have gone in and out of interest of video chatting with Grandma (who they love seeing in person) over the years. We've not really stressed about it too much; we did at first, and then realized it wasn't always going to work out - and all parties learned to be okay with it, basically. To avoid adding too much stress, we just call Grandma ...


13

I found with my kids they are much better if you tell them in advance when something they don't like (eg: bedtime, chores, putting clothes on to go out) is going to happen. Whatever you do, don't just spring it on them. So if you can only stay for a couple of hours, tell them that up-front. For younger kids, who might not have the best memory skills, its a ...


12

I think it's unrealistic to expect a 2 year old to be able to play by themselves for a long time. Some might, but not all. We tried the "cry it out" technique tonight but we know it'll take more than one instance to break this behavior. Is there a better approach than "cry it out" to break our son of this habit? Wanting to be with his parents ...


10

I don't think you'll find studies on this unfortunately, but the concern with screen time is a very different thing than the concern might be with the Roomba or whatnot. From the American Academy of Pediatrics' statement on Media and Young Minds: Children younger than 2 years need hands-on exploration and social interaction with trusted caregivers to ...


9

Not sure if it will work for a 14-month-old, but a 2.5-year-old can already learn to play themselves for 1-2 hours at a time without disturbing the parent. I've used this for extending the time I have available for work, as I've been combining working from home with childcare for about a year now. Of course you'll still need some alternating with the other ...


9

In America, this is referred to as "The Terrible Twos". You just got to start early, while some kids don't hit it until they're three or so. It's pretty normal behavior for kids that age. They don't understand the concept of sharing, fair play, or being nice. It's all about "What's mine is mine, what's yours is mine, anything I see is mine, I ...


9

I think 'punishing' for use of a loud voice, which is just normal toddler behavior as you noted yourself, will be unproductive. If she's happy, content, and playing but just being loud in a fun/rambunctious way, I think letting her do that in another (well baby-proofed) area is appropriate. If you have a video baby monitor, or audio you can put on the ...


9

At 20 months, my oldest was like yours - very physical. So, the main thing I did with him was to take him outside to play. Running around, climbing on the playground, climbing stairs; all of this within reasonable safety limits, though often a bit outside what others were comfortable with, but I knew my son's limits and how careful he was. Obviously this ...


8

Here are a few more. Of course none of these work for every situation. Explain things ahead of time. At breakfast "We're going to the shops this morning.". Then later on "We're going to the shops in five minutes." This lets the child have some sense of a plan. Without it stuff just seems to happen at random, pulling them this way and that without warning. ...


8

There is a great answer here but I would just add my thought. I would go to the church nursery and probably other places like playgroups. Keep an eye on your child, play and stop him every time while saying "don't hit" or "don't throw". After a while, (hopefully) the child will learn what is appropriate behavior. We had to repeat a good amount of time with ...


8

The birth of a child is an occasion where family often will pull out the stops to help, my mother and sister each came from NYC to London for a week and a half after my second was born, giving my wife and I 3 weeks of help, which was great. So you might want to have that conversation with them, there may be someone who would be happy to take the time. ...


8

Intense, short-lived random fears seem to be a pretty normal thing among toddlers. My son is almost 3, and already developed and then mostly overcome fears of bathing, thunder, the vacuum cleaner, bugs, and dog paws (the paws specifically, not even dogs in general!) Some of these are obviously related to loud noises, which is one of the most common toddler ...


8

Your comment that prior to the lockdown your child did enjoy these calls suggests to me that this is a reaction to the social distancing. Think of it, if you will, as seeing them on a screen being too painful a reminder of what she's missing out on, or as her rejecting a perceived attempt to substitute physical closeness with a video chat. I might be wrong ...


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