5

This happened to our 2nd daughter. She's a younger soul, and took a long time to do everything, compared to her peers. Around the middle of autumn, third grade when she was 8, we started to place more responsibility on her, giving her some chores, getting her more grown up clothes (rather than little kid clothes that were pink, etc - nothing against pink, ...


3

I have searched the pediatric literature using every combination of words I could think of, and could find nothing recent (this century) about this. Most of the papers on belching were either associated with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux) or the willful swallowing of air (called Aerophagia) that is considered more of a psychological disorder in older ...


3

Hmm. My son asked me the same thing this week. I wrote him this. "Most children should grow out of thumb sucking and pacifier use between the ages of 3 to 4. As long as the habit is discontinued well before their permanent teeth come in, your child should be fine." source http://www.dentistry.com/daily-dental-care/pediatric-dentistry/the-effects-of-thumb-...


2

I would suggest they go to the dentist to determine if harm is being done, otherwise, don't worry about it. It isn't always a problem. My daughter sucked her thumb straight through to grade 2. Nothing we tried to stop her worked. Our dentist said that the way she sucked wasn't affecting her teeth. She never did need braces and has beautiful teeth. The ...


1

I would say it's a combination. It's not to say you are not burping him well enough. Sometimes after feeding air gets stuck and only comes loose after he has laid down for a while. I found with my own two kids that trying too hard to burp them directly after feeding might also make them bring up the feeding. In my own experience with my own children sucking ...


1

It can cause teeth to move in the wrong directions as they grow in, so in that respect I would say it needs to stop by the time permanent teeth start coming in or you may be looking at some pretty good dental expenses (braces). Aside from that, the biggest concerns would be getting teased for it once he starts pre-K or Kindergarten and chapping on his thumb ...


1

I know this is an old question, and is probably resolved. But in case anybody else finds this: Thumb sucking, nail biting, scab-scratching etc are often symptoms of something being wrong (but not always - treat it as a warning sign). The child might be under pressure or otherwise not thriving in some everyday context. In my case it was undiagnosed ASD and ...


1

From my experience sucking my thumb till about age nine. For the record - I wanted to stop sucking my thumb because I found it embarrassing, so certainly an aspect to stopping thumb sucking was a conscious wanting to stop, but I don't remember enacting any specific plans to stop (as I would any bad habit I have as an adult). You can buy that gross tasting ...


1

I sucked my thumb until I was 18 and I didn't have a problem with it, unlike the people around me. When my parents went about "correcting" it, I couldn't sleep, as I didn't feel safe, and then I would just feel bad that they had a problem with it. Mom eventually accepted it when I was a little older as a source of comfort and then eventually I was able to ...


1

I've known kids, including a very good friend of my 19 year old daughter who was still sucking her thumb in my eighth grade algebra class. Sure, you want her to stop, and she wants to stop, but in the grand scheme of things, this isn't that big a problem, and she will stop eventually. I wouldn't stress too much about it because stressing children rarely ...


1

My daughter had the appliance put on by the dentist. It cost quite a bit and broke apart within a month. The second appliance lasted less than 24 hours. We are going to try some less expensive methods to encourage her to stop sucking her thumb. Mittens, nail polish etc.


1

Personally, I'd advice you to discourage this habit when it starts. It's normal for infants to put hands in their mouth, complete natural behaviour. But in long run, this can become a problem when you want them to grow out of this habit. With my daughter, I discouraged this by putting mittens on her hands and actively plucking her hands out if I find her ...


1

The penny or m&m method: Give the child ten pennies (m&m's, raisins, whatever they like) at the beginning of the day. My Mom did this, and it worked wonders for the kids that were suckers. Each time the child was caught sucking, Mom would tell her (smiling) she owed a penny! For a five year old, the thought of being able to keep ten cents all for ...


1

Ask her what she thinks will help. We did this with our daughter, and she opted for putting a sock on that hand at night. Which works pretty well. I'm sure she's more willing to do it because she thought of it herself (with a little bit of gentle guidance).


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