10

Infants discover the world largely by their mouth. They put virtually everything in mouth, and whatever they can't fit there, they suck or lick. Fists are convenient. They are always close, they are large enough to fill the entire mouth, they are warm... And it's funny that when she puts them in her mouth, she feels something else, a tickling of sorts, on a ...


5

Based on your comments, I would still focus on trying to get him to teeth on teething rings or other similar toys. Get that redirection going and pretty soon he won't be interested in your fingers anymore. In the meantime though, there are some steps you can take to make sure he understands it's not OK. Nobody laugh. It's funny. Everyone gets that; the baby ...


5

A lot of people recommend cold carrots, but the problem with carrots is that the baby can break a piece off that is just the right size to choke him. If you try carrots, you should watch carefully, and preferably only allow him to gnaw on the fat end where he is only likely to get scrapings rather than chunks. It is difficult to come up with a "natural" ...


5

Give her a teether. Just make sure it's one suitable for her age, but teethers are useful for babies who want to use them and will help her with sore gums.


4

Are you giving your baby iron or mineral supplements? It may be deposition from that: Medication use. Infant medications containing iron, such as supplemental vitamins, may cause dark stains on baby teeth. Taking the antibiotic tetracycline during pregnancy can cause a child to have discolored baby teeth, too. If you're very concerned, take him to a ...


4

Some suggestions you could explore: Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


4

I had the same problem and corrected it. Let me give you the insights I learned during this process and some things I tried to get the biting to stop, which it eventually did: The gums rise significantly before the teeth come out and affect the way a baby latches (to a bottle or breast). At 6 months the baby starts eating more solids, which means they need ...


4

I know you said you wanted something edible but how about a frozen, clean washcloth? My kids LOVED this. I'd wet it, tie it in a knot, and freeze it. Not totally, just until it was stiff. They'd gnaw on it for hours. The thought of fabric in my mouth gives me the willies, truthfully, but as long as they r happy (and safe) I'm happy. I also used to give them ...


4

You could blend a fruit puree into an ice cube tray, freeze them, then put them in the fruit mesh bags like these. You would have control over the recipe and the mesh bag would prevent the baby from getting more than they can handle. This would be messier especially now that it's not a whole fruit and actually a dripping ice cube. Strawberries/cherries/...


3

This may be way too simple an answer, but it's the one that keeps recurring to me: could it be that your son is waking up because of his gums, but staying awake because he's hungry? In other words, is he getting enough to eat during the day? I'd try to increase his daytime intake. If and when he wakes up in the night, you could try giving him a refrigerated ...


3

Babies have been doing this since the beginning of time. They are flexible little beings, and any discomfort will likely be minor and short-lived. But if you are concerned, keep a burp cloth (cloth diaper or nappy) over your shoulder whenever you hold him. It protects your clothes as well!!


3

As per the recommendation of the other answer by Mary , we tried crackers(biscuit) as teethers and it worked quite well since if some piece broke while gnawing then it instantly disintegrated with the infant saliva. Also carrots worked well but we had to monitor it. Also our baby loves to gnaw a ripe jackfruit bulb. It seems to be the closest teether ...


3

We had a similar problem and it took a long time to go away. Firstly, consult a doctor. Our doctor suggested the anti-fungal cream Daktarin, but a type without hydrocortisone. Secondly, we made sure her bum was always clean and dry after peeing and pooping. Thirdly, we made sure she had as much time as possible without a nappy on, even though this was risky –...


3

So on the next day I checked the tooth and there was no black/blue color on it. Gum was bright red color and tooth was barely noticeable. An it was ok color. Doctor said it was a little hematoma there. Either my baby bumped into something, or the tooth while growing touched some capillary in the gum.


3

I took these signs from my favourite and well trusted source: Biting: Biting acts as counter pressure to relieve discomfort caused by pressure from poking in teeth via under the gums. Teething makes the baby gum whatever he or she sees or finds, right from fingers to teething rings and to your nipples that can get sore if you are ...


2

While teething is absolutely a possibility as are a number of things (including just a developmental change or difficulty with self-soothing), I wanted to throw this one in the mix. Apparently, this answer is rarely the solution, but when it is the solution things change very quickly. My sister had the same problem and wondered if it was a problem with ...


2

It may well be that what you're seeing is an eruption cyst: It may look like a black tooth, but it is just a small collection of blood under the gum surface that sometimes persists for a bit before the tooth (normal, white) erupts. Most articles (like the one below) state that eruption cysts occur most commonly in the upper jaw. They most commonly occur ...


2

You're in a very difficult situation. My suggestion is to move his bedtime up to 5:30 pm so that he gets adequate sleep before getting up with his mom. Of course that leaves you in a tough predicament. Ideally, your sleep schedule changes as well, or you may be forced to break up your sleep pattern.


2

I had this problem as my little one had poor suction anyway, especially when he was teething. Chewing is soothing to sore gums. Rather than putting the bottle in baby's mouth, I put it to his lips so he had to suck it in. I would also stroke his chin at the same time. However, this only works if baby is hungry. As he was feeding, if he began to chew, I ...


2

If it's really intense then you can consider using child-appropriate pain relievers (acetaminophen or ibuprofen) but, naturally, consult a doctor first. Orajel is the go-to for 2+ but not appropriate for a 7 month old and we never had any success with any of the natural remedies that are available. With our daughter, when it was worst, her favourite ...


2

I would agree with you that "crying it out" seems cruel. You have had a blessed course over the first five months. Most parents find babies to be exhausting. Also teething alone doesn't explain all of his behaviors. You have several other options: 1) Move his floor mattress into your bedroom. Most children are legitimately frightened not knowing where ...


2

According to this article from healthychildren.org (an American Academy of Pediatricians site): Around 3 months of age, babies will begin exploring the world with their mouth and have increased saliva and start to put their hands in their mouth. Many parents question whether or not this means that their baby is teething, but a first tooth usually appears ...


2

Teething may well be the issue. And when it isn't, you'll surely be able to come up with another explanation that is equally reasonable. One of few things that are certain about life with infants is that it's ever changing. Whatever is terrible now is going to look different usually around when you're about to accept it. That realisation has offered us some ...


1

If your housing situation allows it, you might work around the escape problem by making it safe to escape. Our daughter sleeps in her own room. That room has her cot in it and a regular size mattress on the floor, and not much else, except some books and toys. So there's no harm in her escaping from the cot. Such a setup would also mean you don't have to ...


1

Isn't rusk supposed to be dry? Just wondering, if the baby is 8 month's and no teeth definitely this will make it difficult for him and rough, maybe you should try to see if he will like the small smooth biscuits for beginners; and maybe try those at 13+ month's when he has some teeth. Not an expert but I introduced fruits to my boy at 8 month's, I'd cut ...


1

I have two children, one who was VERY slow to night wean, and one who was a breeze (in that regard, only!). If you set aside your anxiety about the future... can you and your spouse live with one night nursing for the time being? In another month or two, you could try night weaning again. Night weaning is hard on the father. The baby can smell the mother,...


1

I think you may be overlooking the possibility of her beginning the teething stage. The most obvious way to get them sucking is to help them learn to enjoy a dummy. My almost 6 month old son has finally taken to the dummy after ~5 months of spitting it out. As a result I think he complains less and has gained stronger suckling power, making feeds quicker in ...


1

Coconut is a good option. A long piece of coconut after Smoothing the edges can bring relief. However, the coconut flesh should be sufficiently hard so that child cannot bite it off and swallow it.


1

A half a corn on the cob. It's soft, pliable (you can make it as soft as you want), but I find a few minutes is enough so that it remains crunchy, soft, and malleable for baby. Our son loves it.


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