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3

Leaving aside the moral issues (as hopefully you are aware of those), and leaving aside whether you should intervene (a very good question itself), in their mind, this is something between the other parents and their son, so why are they involving you? If they want their son not to go, that’s their call, but they should not abstain responsibility for that ...


2

I'm a younger person (in my 20s), and I think the definition of hobby is the issue when dealing with older folks. My parents also tried to get me involved in conventional hobbies like sports, dance, yoga, and crafts. While some of those I enjoyed eventually (like crafts) or not (like sports), I did eventually discover a hobby that is my true passion: fandom. ...


3

It's hard to say what's changed, but one thing you should recognize is that your son is (effectively) an adult. Just like any adult, relationships will ebb and flow, and they have to be allowed to change over time. It's entirely normal for children when they're right about at that point where they're adults, but aren't actually adults, to push away from ...


3

You are not immature. What you posted was a very serious case of sexual harassment. If it was my daughter, I’d hand everything to the police. Other parents would look for extrajudicial punishment. There’s really no way you can apologise for this. PS. If anyone tells you you were not wrong break up any contact with them immediately. You were wrong. The kind ...


4

Xavier - you're learning a hard lesson through this, but you are not alone. We all have made mistakes that have painful consequences that we wish would just go away. What I'm about to say comes from my own experience and lessons learned. You need to understand two things: Your choices that got you to this place did not take into account how others would ...


1

Sadly, there's not a lot you can do in this particular case to make things better. You can and should should apologize to all affected parties, including the friend's girlfriend and family. A good apology should acknowledge how you hurt the person's feelings and it should also show you sincerely mean your apology. But the best thing you can do is to make ...


1

This question takes courage to ask. I hope you're able to find help. Paul Johnson's answer is absolutely on the mark. He mentions some resources in the U.K., so I'm going to go into detail for some resources which may be available for you in the United States, if you're in this country. If you're in the U.S., then in all states (as far as I know), certain ...


5

Please tell us what country (and state if appropriate) that you live in. Different countries and states have different systems and rules. Many countries have helplines for people in your situation (e.g. ChildLine in the UK) who offer support and advice. If you tell us where you are we can point you in the right direction. The police are probably not the best ...


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