9

The following portions of this answer are aimed at helping mom get some social time too(this helps to set a good example, plus even homebody's such as myself need time away from time to time anyway): You might try determining a night or two each month for her to endeavor in an area she would like to "try." She has her career in hand, but has there ever ...


7

If you are in the US, you might suggest she check out your local public library. Most have many free programs for children. It's also a great way to connect with other mothers. Even if your wife doesn't go to the programs with your child, it's an outing to a safe place, educational for both her and your child. She will see friendly people, and she can check ...


6

I think the critical part to finding more time is to let go of the need to "just to look after your child". As parents we might think that doing constant activities with and for the child is our job, when in fact: The more we do (or toys do)… the less our child does the more our child thinks she needs us (or toys) to do for her the less ...


6

As the extremely asocial mom of the most socially capable ten year old in town, I will expand on one particular part of what balanced mama said: join a local playgroup, preferably one that meets once a week. See if your town has a family association that sponsors one; ask at the library; ask moms you see at the playground. Having a once a week play date ...


5

As a stay at home mom (of an almost 4 year old) who left the workforce due to relocating for my husband's job I can relate to your wife's situation. Being around other women in a similar life situation can be encouraging. Her feelings of isolation and being worn down are quite common, especially when one has a weak social support network in their life. It is ...


4

The best resource for this is IRS Publication 503, which covers all of your eligible expenses. The short answer: you can claim 100% of what you've paid so far for daycare, but once your wife stops working, you cannot claim anything at all (whether or not it would normally qualify). If you've paid over $5000 (the limit for the year), you're fine to claim ...


3

I'm a stay at home of a very active three year old, and a 3 month old. My husband accepted a job offer and we moved across country. We love our new home area. And we do have some family here. With that said, it's so lonely. True relationships take years to develop and can take even longer to find. Since moving I have joined a few groups to network and made ...


3

I had great success taking my kids to the local park. As regular visitors to the park, we would see some families repeatedly. I watched for kids who had a similar temperament to my children, and as our kids played together or side-by-side, I would chat with the mother. There was no commitment to make - unlike with a mothers' group - or expense involved. Over ...


3

Have you found any colleagues at work with kids? Ask them for suggestions. While they might not have kids of the right age for playdates, they may know of other families through their daycare, church, neighbors, etc. Also ask about free opportunities in the city for families.


3

Part of the challenge here is to not just use the baby's sleeping time. At 15 months old you should be able to get time for something like reading many times through the day, as they no longer need you 24/7. Reading should be something you can pick up and do at any time - even if it's just a page - so make the most of when your baby is occupied with a toy ...


3

I found that switching to e-Books (e.g. through the Kindle, iBooks, or Kobo apps on your phone, or tabled, or through dedicated readers) helps a situation such as you describe a bit, in that when you have a moment of time, you can immediately pick up your book at the exact spot you stopped before.


3

Trust your wife. If she has chosen to be a stay-at-home mom, don't micromanage her. If she feels up to the task of running your busy household (three small children) without help, let her thrive. If you insist on bringing in outside help when she says she doesn't want it, you are sending a vote of "no confidence" and undermining her in her domain. Let her ...


3

The best schooling for a two year old consists of reading to him and playing with him, and taking him frequently outside to parks and play groups where he can socialize with other kids his age. At two, some of the books he might be interested in that would also be very intellectually stimulating include photo books which consist of nothing but photos of ...


3

Your baby is a hobby! Your beautiful child is a commitment. At 15 months, you've been through the infant stage, one of the tougher ones. Your child is around the point where he'll/she'll be walking. This is the fun part! You're almost at the point where you can take your baby to the park. He'll want to take little walks outside, or get pushed in a buggy. ...


3

I 100% agree with all the posts above! A couple of things to add. First, I'm not going to advise regarding your disatisfaction with your mother-in-law because that's, like, a whole different issue. Second, it sounds like there's some stuff going on under the surface. Like, the lack of a hobby is a symptom of a larger issue at play. I don't play a therapist ...


2

Based on my experience Answering this as someone who decided to quit work and be a stay at home mum to raise my son. Leaving work can be frustrating especially when you know you're not used to being a stay at home mum. At first I thought I couldn't make it but I gathered courage by simply looking for a hobby like you've asked. In my situation, I did ...


2

Give the kid to the mother in law for a couple of hours per day, getting out of the house if necessary for some alone time. However, you will have to live with the mother in law taking care of the kid her way during those hours.


1

You need to not take care of the baby 24/7. That is NOT your job. If you spouse work, and you don't, it is your job to take care of the baby while he is not there (so maybe 10 hours a day?). When you both are home the baby is taken care of by both of you! It also sounds like you are unable to relax with your in-laws around. I sounds like the best way to ...


1

Would part-time child care be an option? Even if its just a few hours a week, it would give you time to get away from the house, your baby and your mother-in-law. Also, if you can find something that involves getting out of the house on a regular basis, like a class, then you could rope your MIL in as a baby-sitter.


1

It sounds like you're feeding him before his nap. Try feeding him something right after his nap, too. My daughter has always been somewhat sensitive to what she eats and would be cranky from the moment she woke up until she had eaten. Assuming it is a low blood sugar thing, what he eats will have a tremendous impact as high-glycemic foods cause insulin to ...


1

Is it possible your child simply craves more interaction with others? At this age, that may be the important missing part of their day. You could try going to the library, or finding a play group, to go to after the nap - that way, there is something to look forward to.


1

There is a general approach to these types of questions / problems, that eliminates opinion-based subjectivity that the initial comment points to. It's called "testing". First, avoid thinking about anything as an infinite commitment to trying something out, which generates a huge mental and financial barrier to trying something out. Look for incremental ...


1

How is your son's behaviour? And specifically, when he's just with your wife? Perhaps he is so demanding because of behavioural issues. Is your wife fit? Starting an exercise program may make her feel much better. Running is free. I suggest going to as many parent/child groups as she can. In the UK there are lots of these groups and they're cheap. Even if ...


1

Play dates and church activities are one way to go. Both parents and children get to mix and play dates are good if you'll aren't very social in groups. Enrolling them in a regular activity like sports or drama or a craft class might be a good idea too and fun for your kids. Organizing a carpool would also be useful. Generally when you have kids its easy ...


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