23

(I'm going to focus on how to help her, rather than determining if she's gifted according to an external set of criteria.) Whether your daughter is considered "gifted" according to the person/methodology used to test this, go ahead & TREAT her as if she's gifted. In other words, do what you're doing now: spend time with her, help her find things she ...


14

She can discern that she's different from other kids her age. She's expressing this in a way that's heartbreaking for me to even read, let alone to deal with as a parent. As hard as it is, the time has come to validate her suspicions. If she didn't need some sort of validation, she wouldn't be asking you. At the risk of sounding chiché-ish, it's time for her ...


14

It's most likely too early to tell. If you could tell, it would depend greatly on how she is learning the things she knows. Children's brains at that age have an extraordinary capacity for repeating things they observe, but mere remembering and repetition doesn't mean true understanding is happening. For example, if she is learning to read new words from ...


13

I'm not sure the difference between gifted or not is important to your actual question, which seems to be how to keep your girl learning and wanting to learn. Your primary concern, that she will be bored of school and hate going, happens even with non-gifted students. Right now, everything she learns is fun - like a game. Learning is "playing", and she ...


12

Aliel, this is obviously very painful for you and for your son, but I think you might be over-reacting to the situation. From what you've written above, these are some of the assumptions you seem to be making, which I think may not be justified: That your 5-year-old son's perception that his teacher is victimising him means that the teacher actually is ...


11

Welcome to the world of special needs parenting! First, to address your immediate concern, my mom learned to read braille as an adult as part of her occupational therapy assistant job to teach it to a blind child. It wasn't terribly difficult to learn it well enough to teach the child at the same pace he was learning it. You don't have to memorize it, do ...


10

I was "gifted." By the second grade, I was so bored with school that my teacher thought I was learning disabled! Fortunately, my school principal was wise. She tested me, then immediately skipped me to the next grade, then a few months later transferred me to the hardest teacher (the "mean" teacher, LOL). That helped a lot (for a few years, anyway -- ...


8

You are not going to get an accurate report on the day's activities in the classroom from a five year old. In fact most 13 year olds don't report accurately on what's going on. I arranged to spend two full days in my child's classroom. I sat at the back, and had a laptop, and tried to work, although I actually found the noise and chaos made working ...


7

The widely used WAIS intelligence test has a version for children that can be taken from the age of 2 and a half; any professional psychologist should be able to administer this test. Also, if there are no special schools for gifted children in your area, try to find a school that allows bright children to skip a year. It's a simple but apparently effective ...


5

As you have not provided much info, this answer is somewhat based on conjecture. It sounds as if your child is neuroatypical. Whatever the condition, he does not like the feeling he experiences (either physical or psychological) when someone hugs or touches him. For some reason, he doesn't welcome touch, and he 'fights back' when someone violates his space. ...


5

My daughter seems to like shoving her hand down her diapers. She is a scratch fan so she just tears up her skin unless we block her with a onesie. They make them for larger kids too: www.special-need-products.com They look like normal shirts so he shouldn't appear strangely to anyone. Just that when he does decide to give the toilet a try he will need extra ...


5

If you can afford counseling, that might be a good idea. Be sure to find someone with experience with transgender and gay issues. It sounds to me as if your child is having anxieties due to gender and disability issues (something (s)he can't control) and is transferring to something (s)he can control. It will be important to find a place where (s)he can ...


5

It sounds like you might be leaning toward homeschooling. If that's the case, bear in mind that you don't have wait for the end of the year. For our son, we didn't even wait out the week, let alone the semester. We had been pondering homeschooling for a while, but one Wednesday he had a particularly bad day with a substitute teacher, and that Friday was ...


4

One thing that struck me when reading your question is whether or not the bad teacher knows that your son has a speech impediment? My younger brother has some minor physical and perception-related handicaps that are not immediately visible, and people often react with anger because he's clumsy and seems to never notice other people around him, crashing into ...


4

This sounds very strange, so strange in fact that I think there might be some kind of misunderstanding involved. I think the only sensible thing to do is to ask for a meeting with her and confront her with what you've told us here. Then see what she says. If she denies it, asking the school administration for a joint meeting might be the way to go. If she ...


3

The first important thing is obviously to move the tone of the conversation from "What is wrong with me?" to "In what ways am I different from neurotypical people?". The latter then is not something where you tell her, but rather where you assist her in figuring out the answer (and listen to what she says about it). It may already be ...


3

I hope someone can give you a better answer than mine. I assume you've tried the usual: tempting him with his favorite foods/drinks? The fact that he's deaf and blind without other neurological conditions means he probably can't override his body's regulatory mechanisms of drinking when thirsty. It takes an incredible will to go on a hunger strike (and yes,...


3

I've referred to my own answers a lot in this Answer. That's somewhat because there are a lot of people with similar concerns, and it's come up before. It's also because I have an ADHD son, and we've tried a number of things that did and didn't work. But I am not going to claim I'm the only expert out there: plenty of perspectives and ideas are available. ...


3

You may or may not consider me "gifted". I was halfway through the fourth grade curriculum when I finished first grade (I had an awesome first grade teacher who encouraged me to work ahead. My family is still friends with her 18 years later). The school wanted me to skip straight to the fourth grade, but my parents decided to keep me with my age group so I ...


3

Unfortunately, there still isn't a lot of understanding ab out the causes of SPD. which is probably why you are getting conflicting information about it. Having only been defined in the (70's I think), not a lot of testing has happened (studies in behavior psychology just take longer. There are limitations to what this science can do - particularly when ...


3

If your child is able to, I'd suggest a "third wheel" style, where you attach a second full seat and a third wheel behind your bike with a pedal and everything. "Trail-a-bike" is one brand, but there are others. This worked well for me with my five year old who was learning to ride but also wanted to go on longer trips with me; he was ...


2

First of, I feel bad for your son going through all this at such a young age. I agree with CreationEdge regarding your first question. "look into the school district's complaint policy. It's time to go over the teacher's head" but you should first make sure(I think you really are) that your teacher actually having mean behaviour towards your son and that ...


2

It kind of sounds like your child might feel a bit out of control and needs a bit of help forming structure around their life. Something you can do is to sit down with them and discuss solid achievable goals. They need to differentiate between achievable and useless goals. Tell them that having goals, such as being "not good enough", aren't achievable and ...


2

I'd like to help her in dealing with her giftedness. I can relate. As you discovered, as a child, a little boredom in school won't kill anyone is not true. Being chronically bored in school can be excruciating, and the feeling of isolation can be permanently damaging -- hence, the tremendous anxiety you feel, and the loving desire you have to help her ...


2

I don't know if this will help but I have a daughter of a very similar age with some similar characteristics. What strikes me about your daughter is reading and arithmetic. I've certainly not witnessed any children either reading or doing any form of arithmetic at this age. My daughter is currently 2 years and 5 months, she can: Count from 1 to 10 in ...


2

How can a child who is in 3rd grade with ADHD/ADD enforces himself to do his homework without relying on his mom? 1.) Be as sure as you can about the diagnosis. I want to take a moment to tackle a difficult topic first. ADD is real, but there is a concern by many people that there are a number of false diagnoses for ADHD and ADD. You can read these ...


1

Sounds like my son. Still can't swallow pills. Thankfully from my own breakdowns, I have experience with the right medication. Half a lorazepam tablet quickly disolves on the toungue. Within 30 minutes there is calm from the anxiety attack. If my son has a presentation that he is having anxiety about, he will take it before that class so his nerves are in ...


1

This is not an authoritative answer, by any means, but I'd guess that, especially for kids' books, you would have the lines of Braille right under the lines of visual text, so you could read it aloud at the same pace as your child is following with their hands. It would almost have to be done that way, actually, because if you learned Braille, yourself, how ...


1

Plenty of good answers here, but I didn't see this mentioned, so I'll add: A lot of people of all ages (with or without other disabilities) have a hard time keeping track of what their real priorities are or should be. Obviously teenagers are often more vulnerable to this, but it really is quite common. They can get into a "tunnel vision" mindset that ...


1

Counseling as well as behavior therapy would help a lot with the anxiety. The therapist should be working on coping skills especially as it relates to transition times from preferred activity. Make a schedule and make her stick to it. Make a time for everything including leisure activities. It will be a fight and her behaviors will increase but it will get ...


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