11

Infants discover the world largely by their mouth. They put virtually everything in mouth, and whatever they can't fit there, they suck or lick. Fists are convenient. They are always close, they are large enough to fill the entire mouth, they are warm... And it's funny that when she puts them in her mouth, she feels something else, a tickling of sorts, on a ...


6

Look into babywearing. I have been doing this with my daughter since she was born. Nothing is more easy for me or her. I can still use my hands and yet she can be close to me and follow around with what I'm doing. As with all things related to babies, it took some time to get used to it.


4

Until babies do notice, the solution is just to gently remove the bottle, and either replace with another bottle if she still needs more, or let her suck on a (clean) knuckle or fingertip. You shouldn't let her just suck on air, as she will need to burp a lot, and until she does it could be uncomfortable for her. Have you looked at how much you are feeding ...


3

It sounds like he's had some stressful changes in his life. He has been using a method of self-soothing that's working for him, but working less well for you. Putting it into perspective a little bit, he can continue to bite the inside of his cheek, which not only predisposes him to canker sores, but can actually cause cancer (in a few decades, if he ...


2

We took my daughter's pacifier away when she was almost 3 (my son never got attached to one). We told her weeks in advance that we'd hang it on the Christmas Tree and Santa would leave an extra present in exchange. We reminded her frequently so it wouldn't be a surprise and she could mentally prepare for it. She cried a bit on Christmas Eve and missed it ...


2

Do you wiggle the bottle to get the last drops into the nipple? This alone can signal the end of the bottle, especially if you start wiggling occassionally before it needs to be. I would also hesitate to let your daughter suck air. In all likelihood, she'll burp it up, but in a less desirable scenario, some of it will make it to the small intestines where ...


2

That age can be tough. Both of our boys went through similar issues around two - they had a lot harder time going to sleep, went to sleep later, and were very hard to soothe. Some of it is, unfortunately, just time. We tried several thing, some of which were helpful: Consistent bedtime. Try to get it to be a very consistent routine, consistent time, etc....


2

My eldest did this, particularly at night. I remember spending many nights pacing around the house carrying my little one to soothe her, only for her to get upset when I stopped. Mine liked to be upright, with a gentle rocking motion and being able to stretch her legs (which I suspect is the main reason for the kicking when you stop.) There isn't a huge ...


1

I'll weigh in here and risk sounding like a terrible person. We had a very similar experience with our second, except maybe worse. We got some good sleep out of him for the first couple weeks of his life, but it quickly degraded into 30/45min sleep cycles all the time. For the next 3 months he never slept more than 45 minutes at a stretch, ever. I'm ...


1

Babies have a need to suck. It brings comfort. Breastfeeding has the advantage that it delivers milk & satisfies the need to suck at the same time. Drinking from the bottle, while requiring effort, does not satisfy this need enough. My daughter is a very fast drinker, so when she finished a bottle, she got a pinky or a pacifier. I do admit that for my ...


1

The cheek biting can be a transient tic. With tics, the more you try to legislate, the more entrenched it can get. When you get involved in a fairly pointless tug-of-war, it can be very effective to gently let go of the rope. There are a couple of ways you can turn this so that your son gets some aspects of maturation while still satisfying his sensory ...


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