5

The sudden step back might have a physical cause (tooth breaking through, coming down with a fever, stomach cramps from a change of diet, whatever), in which case the problem will be short-lived and go away once the physical cause disappears. If not, read on. Any advice? Yes: Do whatever works. Don't fall for all the parenting advice that tells you ...


3

My 5 year old son is very similar in his wake-up routine. I’ve found a few things that help keep him occupied for a bit longer in the mornings so that I and my daughter can get some more time to sleep. have easily accessible breakfast foods so he can spend about 10-15 minutes eating breakfast on his own. I have a basket system and also a designated “grab ...


2

I am in a very similar situation we live in a 1.5 bedroom apt, my younger daughter is 17 months old breastfeeding and co-sleeping. We have really started to enforce weaning and getting her in a crib to sleep, as a result she is waking up less and is better rested in the morning. My wife will breastfeed her at bed time (approx the same time every night), ...


2

Teething may well be the issue. And when it isn't, you'll surely be able to come up with another explanation that is equally reasonable. One of few things that are certain about life with infants is that it's ever changing. Whatever is terrible now is going to look different usually around when you're about to accept it. That realisation has offered us some ...


2

If she's falling asleep on her own and staying in her bedroom, I don't see the issue. If she is getting up, my first thought is that you might want a longer bedtime routine. Ours isn't perfect, but it looks something like this and has worked fairly well for the past two years: Bedtime snack Potty! Bath Floss and brush. She'll do a bit, then I'll actually ...


2

Patience in sleep training is critical. You're setting up a routine, and that takes a lot of time. My first note would be that sleep training at home is not necessarily related to sleep at nursery. My oldest was extremely difficult to train at home - we didn't have him really trained until more like 4 or 5 - but was the best napper at the nursery. They ...


2

Ours have been restless like this and it was due to some issues with reflux. Do you notice him making gulping noises or seeming to swallow uncomfortably? If you do, you could talk to your pediatrician about a Zantac prescription. Other safe alternatives that helped us and are over the counter would be: A soothing formula There is a product we used from ...


1

The good news is that waking up during the night is probably not doing her any harm as long as her total sleep amount is enough for her needs. My son is almost 3 and has never slept through the night, yet is meeting all his milestones handily. Many toddlers and young children experience night waking with no ill effects. Sweaty sleeping seems to be pretty ...


1

Maybe a late answer but i hope this give some insights to people reading this question I think the most important thing for your son to get more sleep is reduce the number of times he is fed. At age of 1 it is not uncommon for a kid to get 6-7 "feeding times" a day and none during the night. What worked for our son is that we made his last feeding larger (...


1

Our first child was a very bad sleeper until about 12 months when we did the cry-it-out method. It took a few days and since then he has been a fantastic sleeper. I think stopping feeding at night was important. Our second is about 6 months old and sometimes you can set him in bed and he'll go to sleep on his own. There's no right answer unfortunately. All ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible