7

For the most part, what worked for us with our child when he was a bit younger and had particularly dry skin was a combination of ointments (like a petroleum jelly, even) on exposed skin, humidified air, and being a bit more circumspect with hand washing. It didn't seem to matter how much water he drank; I don't know that drinking more than 'normal' ...


6

Dry skin is the leading cause of itchiness during the wintertime, and @Joe hit every point. I just want to reiterate the high points and add a couple of things that might give you good results: Don't use detergent (e.g. body gel/wash) or regular soap; both strip the skin pretty significantly, the first because they often use sodium laurel (or laureth) ...


6

Yes, it is a valid concern. There is no reason to put camphor oil on any infant. There is no clinical benefit, and there is a risk of respiratory damage, seizures, liver damage and even death. Every camphor-containing over-the-counter preparation is clearly labeled with instructions to avoid use in children under two years of age. Because of the danger of ...


4

The main consideration with infant sunscreens are they should be Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide based only; not only will these be much less irritating1, but they are considered safer. Infants absorb a lot more through their skin than older children and adults, and so the Oxybenzone and other organic chemicals in many adult (and even some child) sunscreens ...


4

Yes it is common! Just wash with water and a soft cloth. "Baby acne occurs when hormonal changes in the body stimulate oil glands in the baby's skin. The condition can look worse when the baby is crying or fussy, or any other instance that increases blood flow to the skin. Baby acne is harmless and usually resolves on its own within several weeks" (Medline ...


4

No one can diagnose your baby over the internet, especially when no details are given (is the baby sick? Do you live in a hot climate? How long has the rash been there? Is it spreading? Does it seem to be causing any discomfort? Etc., etc.) There are many questions to ask, and a physical exam to perform, to answer this kind of query. Rashes in newborns are ...


2

The best sunscreen is one that doesn't trigger her allergies. There's no "one size fits all" here -- for example, I'm allergic to a common ingredient (I don't know which one) in most "hypoallergenic" sunscreens. What you should do is test sunscreens as you get them: spread a small amount on the inside of her wrist (one of the places where the skin is the ...


1

Actually, to give you my point of view about this topic I will write a bit about the same 'problem' that happened to me. When I was a child, someone scratched me on my face (with his/her nail). Well, that happened when I was about 2yo, now I'm 18 and the scar remained on my face. It's not that you would immediately notice it but it is visible. But that's ...


1

The most effective way to prevent scar darkening is sun protection, since sun exposure can darken scars. It's not clear from your post how severe the scar is. Unless it's disfiguring or disrupts physical movement or her self-esteem, I strongly recommend against any other interventions without consulting your pediatrician. Any skin concerns are usually ...


1

Newborns are exposed to all the intense hormones of labor that flooded through the mother's system and made birth possible. It gives the baby acne that can last for a while. Talk to your pediatrician if you're worried, but it's pretty standard for the acne to show up within a week or two of birth. My son had it all over his chest. You don't need to do ...


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