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0

I see that such situations are frustrating for my boy. What response shall I teach him? On one hand I do not want him to be aggressive, on the other hand I want to find a fair solution for him so that he does not only play [the] role of a fool who gives up and gets out of her way. I agree with another answerer that you need to get your child other playmates ...


2

It's not your son's fault - you need to control other people's children instead Especially if you've invited them around your house. And especially if they're doing things which are unfair on your child. As far as possible, you let their parents intervene - but if they aren't on hand, or they're distracted, or they just haven't noticed, then you can and ...


8

Get your child other playmates in addition to this friend. I am not suggesting to avoid this friend, but instead dilute their interactions with hopefully more positive ones. Talk to your child, ask him what he feels when playing with that friend. Listen and pay attention. Ask him to name the feelings. Acknowledge the feelings. This does not mean approve of ...


57

I think the first thing is to take a step back and consider that they are both acting normally for their age. It's normal at age 2 and 3 to have limited social skills, limited empathy for others, and very little impulse control. It's not likely that the little girl is intentionally setting your son up to get in trouble when she gets an aggressive response ...


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