53

This is a great teachable moment, both for your daughter and the other child. First - talk with her about the risks of bringing things she cares about to school. I would usually not recommend having kids take things they care about to school - not because I think the other kids will be bad per se, but it's just too likely to lose things, accidentally break ...


52

I agree that 5 yo boys who wolf whistle are probably just proud to show off a skill they've imitated to the level of mastery. They would probably turn a shade of green if they understood all the implications a wolf whistle carries. However, there is an appropriate way to whistle and an inappropriate one, and it's the parent's job, as well as the teacher's ...


51

There's a middle ground between requiring the card to be protected, and saying nothing, and that's to inform the child what makes the card special, but then let the child choose what to do with the card. "This is a rare and valuable card, very special and beautiful. Because it is special, it is in this special card protector to keep it nice. If you ...


40

Find out why The first thing to do is to find out why he's running away and crying. I am deeply concerned that no-one in your family has apparently even thought to ask him that. If you had, then I would have expected to see that as a major part of your question. If in fact you have, then please edit your question to give us this crucial information. And if ...


40

Buy him a set of sleeves. Sleeves for trading cards are cheap, and basically every adult who plays trading card games uses them - and when decks for these games can cost hundreds of dollars, they have good reasons for doing so. Just buy him a set of sleeves that he can use for his entire deck, and tell him to use them like the grown-ups do. Just insisting ...


38

Your child is six years old, and what you’re describing is a normal, developmentally appropriate reaction. Your job as the parent is to help him learn how to approach difficult tasks, by being supportive and positive, by modeling good strategies, and most importantly by never dismissing his feelings. He feels like it is too hard, and that is okay; the ...


25

This is very dependent on the child, as are all questions of this sort, but 5-6 is certainly possible. My children, now eight and nine, were first exposed to programming in a meaningful way at around the age of 4-5. We started with simple games that are "programming lite", which basically involve the child creating a "program" either to ...


22

I'm a fan of building up a programming mindset without even needing to use a computer. One good example is the peanut-butter sandwich game. You pretend to be a robot, while the child gives you instructions which you execute with painstakingly literal precision. Child: Put the peanut butter on the bread. Parent: [puts the unopened peanut butter jar onto ...


20

The more people know about computers the later they appear to let their kids near them. This Business Insider article has a few observations and quotes: Gates, for example, didn't let his kids use cellphones until they were 14. Jobs, the inventor of the iPad, prohibited his own kids from using the tech. To safeguard their kids, tech worker parents often ...


19

Not sure if it applies at seven years old, but our child has always had a strong dislike of learning anything new involving body excrements. It manifested in similar ways, fighting and not wanting to try at all, and cannot explain why not. In the end we bribed our way out of it. Paper with 20 boxes on the toilet wall, after each box has a cross the child ...


18

In my experience, most children at age 7 do not really understand the value of things in monetary terms. They generally have not yet had to make their own decisions around earning, managing or spending money. Even if the child understands the mathematics behind the money, they are unlikely to assign more personal value to something because it is more ...


16

With the facepalm emoji that came from parent 1, I think you should assume that the parent does not believe that it is okay for their son to be doing this. With that in mind, you may be able to come up with a way that encourages the conversation to move in a good direction but doesn't blame the parent. If it were me, I would say something like Any luck ...


13

mentioning a very rare card that he wishes he had doesn't automatically translate into hoping you would get it for him, let alone it being likely that he will be glad he received it if you do get it for him. Sometimes it's just nice to dream about an idealized unattainable item. I wish I had a pet elephant, but if you got me one I'd soon be furious at the ...


13

If you guys lived in the US, a good first step would be to ask that the school give her a comprehensive evaluation. This would show whether there are any learning difficulties, which might help her doctor figure out what's going on. Another good first step would be to book an appointment with a developmental pediatrician. I don't know about other countries.


12

I’m gobsmacked. I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that perhaps in your efforts to be concise you were a little harsh on the way you portrayed yourself? Ok, firstly, homework at age 6? Yes, absolutely, it’s about learning good habits and demonstrating what he’s learned in class, and it should also be about bonding with loving parents over time ...


10

"Code" is not the same as "programming". For example, my daughter played an app called Coding Safari (https://www.hopster.tv/coding-safari/) when she was about 3-4yo. That app is based around dragging and dropping instructions that a "robot" can follow. She did similar things at nursery and early years school at the same age ...


9

Society has to constantly make trade-offs between competing dangers from both sides. On the one hand, there is the danger of initially innocent behaviour escalating to harassment and violence. On the other hand there is the danger of people being punished for entirely legal and non-violent behaviour and speech that other people find offensive, disagreeable, ...


9

"Full immersion" can work well for potty training. You could try sitting her on a small portable potty in front of the television all day with lots of juice. Just getting comfortable sitting on it and urinating might be half the battle. Bribery will probably help too.


8

I think you should take a step back and perhaps put yourself in your son's shoes. As a six year old, his highest priority isn't these assignments. It's playing. It's running around and jumping or hanging out with his friends at a park. A mental shift has to occur to get in the mindset for doing schoolwork and it won't happen for a while - years even. This is ...


7

My children are still younger and terrified of anything remotely exciting, as stories go, so we often have this conversation, that some people like sad stories, some people enjoy suspense, while others may just want to be amused. It's all entertainment and we'll have to accept that there are genres that aren't for us. I think that's all that needs to be said ...


7

Well, here's some things for you to think about - a few slaps to warm your ears. Firstly, from your description it seems that you are far too harsh with your son, and you seem unempathetic. A child needs to know that their parent love and respect them, and that they can come to you with any problem at all and find comfort and understanding - and possibly ...


7

I think you are setting yourself up for disappointment by giving him the card. It's very likely that your nephew will love the card, but like my kid, he will love the card to death. It's also likely that in a few months, he'll move on to some other obsession, like 7-year olds have a tendency to do. I also think that buying a rare and expensive thing for your ...


5

I would absolutely encourage you to try. Positive parenting is a rather wide umbrella, most of which has some evidence to back up its claims, so the "will it work" question in your title is too broad to give a detailed answer to, but could answered in general terms: yes, probably. It's not an all-or-nothing package; I think you should start out ...


5

He's only seven years old and really doesn't have the maturity to understand why one of the cards he plays with should be kept in a box (seriously, at seven, you want to play with your toys, not just look at them). He's may have heard about this card on the school grapevine and that's why he mentions it - one of his little buddies may have been bragging ...


5

I'd like to bring some specific experience here: I'm a Pokémon league organizer for a league of 7-8 year olds (pre-pandemic, and hopefully again post!), and a parent of two children who collect, and play, Pokémon cards. The answer here depends greatly on the child. The most common thing a child would do with Pokémon cards, of any value or type, is to bring ...


5

This is indeed a teachable moment. Perhaps, you are not even the only parent from the group who feels that way, and if you are, if you voice your concerns in the right way, more parents might look at the situation from a different perspective. I think it would be totally fine to half-jokingly bring it up in the chat. “You know, guys, I’ve been thinking about ...


4

If you are helping with homework during the Covid-19 stay-in-place, that is not mentioned and also may be a big contributor with anxiety that your child is experiencing in addition to the push to do homework. Parents need to step back during the pandemic and lessen the stress on children, not add to it. As an advocate for disabled students for over 25 years, ...


4

It is always worth discovering if there is a real reason for fear. It's possible this is not oversensitivity but a reaction to some past event. Do you remember when the behaviour started? Was it immediately, the first time homework was assigned? Or was it after the homework was first submitted? Adults can sometimes unwittingly use phrases that work for one ...


4

You should resolve the "Entity 303"-specific issue first and only then face the more general problem of him believing to everything on YouTube. I was personally involved in a similar situation some years ago. I got pretty scared of another creepypasta from the Minecraft world (Herobrine) and didn't want to play alone. I was able to overcome this ...


4

At age 4 I was given a ZX Spectrum 48k computer and a book published by Usborne called BASIC for Beginners. From that moment on I was hooked. The next year I was given Practice Your BASIC. By age 8 we had a PC in the house, and I started trying to teach myself C using the book The C Primer. Pointers really confused me back then, and I gave up after a while ...


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