53

This is a great teachable moment, both for your daughter and the other child. First - talk with her about the risks of bringing things she cares about to school. I would usually not recommend having kids take things they care about to school - not because I think the other kids will be bad per se, but it's just too likely to lose things, accidentally break ...


52

I agree that 5 yo boys who wolf whistle are probably just proud to show off a skill they've imitated to the level of mastery. They would probably turn a shade of green if they understood all the implications a wolf whistle carries. However, there is an appropriate way to whistle and an inappropriate one, and it's the parent's job, as well as the teacher's ...


16

With the facepalm emoji that came from parent 1, I think you should assume that the parent does not believe that it is okay for their son to be doing this. With that in mind, you may be able to come up with a way that encourages the conversation to move in a good direction but doesn't blame the parent. If it were me, I would say something like Any luck ...


9

Society has to constantly make trade-offs between competing dangers from both sides. On the one hand, there is the danger of initially innocent behaviour escalating to harassment and violence. On the other hand there is the danger of people being punished for entirely legal and non-violent behaviour and speech that other people find offensive, disagreeable, ...


5

This is indeed a teachable moment. Perhaps, you are not even the only parent from the group who feels that way, and if you are, if you voice your concerns in the right way, more parents might look at the situation from a different perspective. I think it would be totally fine to half-jokingly bring it up in the chat. “You know, guys, I’ve been thinking about ...


3

I think a year is a reasonable timeframe, if the child wants it enough - but the child really will determine this. One of most the challenging things to teach is persistence - instead of flitting from one thing to another each time something is boring or difficult, doing something long enough to become good at it. A common approach is not dissimilar to this:...


2

I've seen something like this in my kids before, and I think it's worth separating a few possibilities as they are treated differently. One possible scenario is that he legitimately does believe something to be true other than what you believe to be true. My children, particularly my oldest, went through very long phases where they believed they didn't ...


2

You deal with this one on one with the parent of the kid that's doing it. Explain your side to them and see if it stops. If you tell your daughter she should be offended if someone wolf whistles at her, she will be offended and possibly hurt if someone does that (or maybe more so if they don't whistle at some point in the future). The boy is not ...


1

Every child is different, and some parents consider their children "more ready" than others to start school. I'm in the UK, where most children begin school the September after their 4th birthday. This means that some children in the same class are just 4, whereas some will be nearly 5, so classrooms contain an age range that spans a whole 12 ...


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