16

No, nothing is too late. I sense some very important things in your favour: Your milk supply matches her needs. Two weeks is pretty early, even in "standard" cases BF is still not that established at that age. You seem determined to make this work and willing to ask for help -an excellent attitude. Without more details, it's hard to give precise advice, ...


8

I spent the majority of my time in NICU, when I could not hold my son, holding his little hand in the incubator. (Probably helped me more than him, but who knows?) Soon as the docs will allow it, ask for some kangaroo time. Physical contact is a great bonding facilitator. Sing to them. My son, now 30 months old and out of NICU for QUITE a while, still ...


7

My daughter was born at 27 weeks. Congratulations will be appreciated in any case, I don't think you've stuck your foot in your mouth. After all, they did expect to have a baby, just not quite so soon. At this point they may be able to spend time in the hospital with their daughter. But they won't spend all their time there, so they will be able to look ...


6

I decided to throw this answer in here for completeness, to be a little more general. It depends. My first was 4 weeks early, and we calculated based on his actual birthday. This was based on advice from our pediatrician. (and he did, and he caught up on height/weight by 6 months) However, 4 weeks is not that early (given that in the US, 3 weeks early ...


6

My son was born 3 weeks early, just on the line for being considered a premature birth. According to some measures, he was "behind" developmentally early on. I'd say that you should evaluate what you read based on your direct experience with your child. Most books provide ranges for development in any case. If your question could be restated as "Should I ...


4

My first baby was 4 weeks early. He had a hard time latching, since his mouth was so tiny. He was also VERY small and skinny, and we were only allowed 15 min of breastfeeding as it wore him out. He had a much easier time with a nipple shield for the first few weeks. It was recommended by a nurse, though my nipples are not flat. I would say go ahead and ...


3

Continue to offer the nipple! It took a couple weeks for my baby to latch, so in the beginning I was exclusively pumping. The cradle and the cross cradle hold I learned in the hospital from the lactation consultant just wasn't working for us. It actually wasn't until I came across this article on "natural breast feeding" that I had some success. During ...


3

Early intervention from speech-language therapists, occupational therapists, and physical therapists, can be very, very helpful. Are these available where you live? A good place to find out would be by talking with a doctor or nurse. I think you are doing the right thing by questioning whether his development is everything it could be. Reading between ...


3

Mine was a month early too, and her pediatrician seems to expect her to hit things based on her birthdate, but said not to worry if she was late. For instance, she wasn't social smiling at 6 weeks, but was at 10 weeks. My sleep book (Weissbluth) says to expect babies to develop sleepwise based on due date, not birthdate.


2

WARNING! This response may contain discussion of breastmilk that some may find 'icky'. Yet most people are usually ok with drinking milk intended for baby cows... Getting milk Probably the most pressing thing is the supply issue - how do you obtain breastmilk for a premature baby. The odds are good that you aren't producing any useful milk yourself. If you ...


1

I have no NICU experience but I do remember attempting a search for a similar product upon release from the maternity ward with my first newborn. In my case, the cloths were blue, and I ended up finding out that they are actually dishcloths. However, we found that they were too big and too expensive to be practical long term. Even if we cut them into smaller ...


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