16

No, nothing is too late. I sense some very important things in your favour: Your milk supply matches her needs. Two weeks is pretty early, even in "standard" cases BF is still not that established at that age. You seem determined to make this work and willing to ask for help -an excellent attitude. Without more details, it's hard to give precise advice, ...


10

The best advice is to ask your pediatrician. As well, at least around here, there is a program run by the city called birth to three where they will come evaluate a child for free and then have a sliding pay scale should services be needed. Check to see if your area has something like this. We used them and they were great.


8

I spent the majority of my time in NICU, when I could not hold my son, holding his little hand in the incubator. (Probably helped me more than him, but who knows?) Soon as the docs will allow it, ask for some kangaroo time. Physical contact is a great bonding facilitator. Sing to them. My son, now 30 months old and out of NICU for QUITE a while, still ...


7

We had our daughter tested by an audiologist who often dealt with children. Although our daughter was fine, the audiologist told us that most parents bring their children in when it's way too late. Some children had gone years without their problems being diagnosed. As Morah said, speak to a pediatrician but also ask about the option of having your child's ...


7

My daughter was born at 27 weeks. Congratulations will be appreciated in any case, I don't think you've stuck your foot in your mouth. After all, they did expect to have a baby, just not quite so soon. At this point they may be able to spend time in the hospital with their daughter. But they won't spend all their time there, so they will be able to look ...


6

I decided to throw this answer in here for completeness, to be a little more general. It depends. My first was 4 weeks early, and we calculated based on his actual birthday. This was based on advice from our pediatrician. (and he did, and he caught up on height/weight by 6 months) However, 4 weeks is not that early (given that in the US, 3 weeks early ...


6

My son was born 3 weeks early, just on the line for being considered a premature birth. According to some measures, he was "behind" developmentally early on. I'd say that you should evaluate what you read based on your direct experience with your child. Most books provide ranges for development in any case. If your question could be restated as "Should I ...


4

Meg's answer hits it on the head regarding the fact that your son was a preemie. You really have to go by their due date for the first couple of years' milestones. Additionally, it sounds like your son does understand what you're saying, as he responds to very simple commands ("look") and his name, not to mention that he's figured out how to consciously ...


4

Both of my kids were born early...my son was 4 weeks early and my daughter was 5 weeks early. I have noticed a HUGE difference in my daughter's development compared to my son's, as well as her development compared to her cousin who is 21 days older than her. She is not as developed verbally as her cousin or as her brother was at her age. I have had to ...


4

My first baby was 4 weeks early. He had a hard time latching, since his mouth was so tiny. He was also VERY small and skinny, and we were only allowed 15 min of breastfeeding as it wore him out. He had a much easier time with a nipple shield for the first few weeks. It was recommended by a nurse, though my nipples are not flat. I would say go ahead and ...


3

Continue to offer the nipple! It took a couple weeks for my baby to latch, so in the beginning I was exclusively pumping. The cradle and the cross cradle hold I learned in the hospital from the lactation consultant just wasn't working for us. It actually wasn't until I came across this article on "natural breast feeding" that I had some success. During ...


3

Early intervention from speech-language therapists, occupational therapists, and physical therapists, can be very, very helpful. Are these available where you live? A good place to find out would be by talking with a doctor or nurse. I think you are doing the right thing by questioning whether his development is everything it could be. Reading between ...


3

Mine was a month early too, and her pediatrician seems to expect her to hit things based on her birthdate, but said not to worry if she was late. For instance, she wasn't social smiling at 6 weeks, but was at 10 weeks. My sleep book (Weissbluth) says to expect babies to develop sleepwise based on due date, not birthdate.


3

If you can, use some holiday time and take wednesdays off work. I did this in the first few weeks after paternity leave finished. The effect is that you get a little 'mini weekend' to break up the week, so that its only 2 days without help around the house for your other half, rather than 5 days.


2

WARNING! This response may contain discussion of breastmilk that some may find 'icky'. Yet most people are usually ok with drinking milk intended for baby cows... Getting milk Probably the most pressing thing is the supply issue - how do you obtain breastmilk for a premature baby. The odds are good that you aren't producing any useful milk yourself. If you ...


2

My kid was slow developing. I was worried about a variety of things until he started crawling at 15 months and walking at 17 months. In England you have a health visitor you can call if you have queries. I found this of great use just to reassure that kids develop at different rates and this is still in the range of normal. I would say speak to someone but ...


1

I have no NICU experience but I do remember attempting a search for a similar product upon release from the maternity ward with my first newborn. In my case, the cloths were blue, and I ended up finding out that they are actually dishcloths. However, we found that they were too big and too expensive to be practical long term. Even if we cut them into smaller ...


1

This is a special case, so it is best to consult your doctor about it. I agree with the earlier comment, that only your doctor can give you sound and professional advice regarding this matter, since he knows your baby's condition. It is also best to read stuff on how you can help your baby to gain weight and so on, so you can fully support their growing up ...


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