38

My personal opinion is that there are no sites I would consider appropriately curated. This is something you should watch with them, discuss with them, and if needed, change channel. I don't know of any unbiased news channels, either on television, or via the internet (so your comment about not allowing TV news but allowing tablets doesn't really help you)...


21

You don't say how old your daughter is, so this depends somewhat on age. I'll assume she's at least 8 or 9 years old; younger than that it seems unlikely for this to matter too much (as she won't have enough understanding of politics to care about her grandmother's views). To me, this is a great opportunity to teach your daughter about opposing viewpoints, ...


14

If you don't start teaching them yourself, they will learn it from their friends. If you wait until you think they're"ready", you'll wait until it's too late. The news media has always been subject to manipulation for propaganda purposes, and awareness of that is an important step towards developing critical thinking skills. Be rational about the news, ...


13

Children often have more awareness of the world than we give them credit for and it's important for us, as adults, to remember that the world can look very different from a child's perspective. Things that would seem illogical and wholly unrealistic to us, might seem inevitable to them. So you should try to spend some time to figure out exactly what she is ...


11

I will try to make some suggestions which you may or may not find suitable: Talk to her about it. She obviously understands something about politics, explain her more about it, be ready to answer her questions. (If you are not a supporter of Trump, which we can't know) tell her that you personally do not wish him to become a president, promise her that you'...


10

Just my two cents, I think one great way to get started with world news is to get a World Map or a globe. That way, when they look at the news headlines and images, they have a mental reference point. For example, they may hear of deteriorating North Korea - Japan relations, and looking at the map will help to cement their understanding of why those two ...


8

Compliment her. This is a great achievement for a 6 year old and you should be proud. Let her know. Find out her source of knowledge. It's probably a good source, but you want to make sure that what you are telling her and what else she hears is consistent and not confusing and scary. Tell her the truth in concepts that she is familiar with. "Even adults ...


7

The question ought not be be about politics or religion or... well anything else specific. The question is fundamentally about views which are either 1) different than yours or 2) expressed in a manner which you, as the parent, find inappropriate. As a parent I live by a one-goal rule: To teach my child to think for herself and be the best "her" she can be....


6

I don't tell my children a great deal about current news yet. We do talk about what is going on in the world around them. I don't personally care to watch the news myself, I tend to read it and so does my spouse. I do tell my 10yr old that news sources are biased and you have to take that into account. I also tell him that his parents are biased and ...


6

With the increasing motivation and power of schoolkids to potentially change laws in the US, the greatest support you can give your child may be too show them you support them. That may sound a little trite, but this could include being behind them if their school complains at their absence, helping encourage them if they feel disheartened, and potentially ...


6

The BBC is generally pretty good. Of course any individual article will have it's own particular slant and the BBC does put out opinion based pieces but news is generally pretty neutral overall and the BBC does a pretty good job as a whole of being balanced, which is arguably better than eliminating all trace of opinion. Also mainstream (ie those which are ...


5

If your end goal is to have your mother NOT discuss these issues around your daughter, I'd suggest using a one-two approach: Redirect the conversation. "Gee, Mom, what did you think about the meatloaf we had at that restaurant? Wasn't it delicious?" Leave. If you have the time, go through the threads at the HiveMind (ask.metafilter.com) about dealing with ...


3

This is specifically for the 8 years old one: Don't use television / streams / video in general as the primary source for news. Go for the "slow" route of newspapers, prints and similar stuff. This firstly is great to control the graphic content as newspapers tend to publish more text, less images - and that is what news are all about. Secondly, you are ...


2

Your question poses a common predicament - what to do with upsetting adult behavior around your child. What are your rights and responsibilities as a parent in this specific situation and future similar interactions with extended family members? How will you respond to issues of boundaries with your parents (and other adults) when it comes to your children? ...


2

I think the best way to reduce her fear is to explain that what she fears cannot happen. You could read this excert from The Bill Of Rights together... Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof Explain that her friend is free to be a Muslim in America, and there is nothing that Trump, ...


2

As a 46 year old woman who has to deal with parents whose political views differ quite radically from my own, I agree whole heartedly with the answer above, which recommends you help your daughter discern between facts and views as she gets older, so that that she can more objectively assess any issues that come up. I wouldn't ever underestimate the ...


2

I agree with @Rory Alsop that there is no unbiased news channel, but there are some that are more obviously interested in reporting sensational news (bloodshed, explosions, crashes) than more noteworthy news. I agree with whoever recommended NPR and the BBC; they are not so hungry for viewers that like sensationalism. If you want to monitor content, you can ...


2

If you continue to teach your daughter about the world, explaining and demonstrating good behaviour (such as humility, open-mindedness and healthy scepticism), she will be very well equipped to decide for herself that her grandmother's blaming is nonsense. This will actually be more effective than anything you can do to try and directly control this ...


2

Call me a negative nancy but I honestly believe the best way to support your child in the walk out is to be there with them, walk them a different direction from everyone else, then drive the hell away from the whole crowd. From a failed-human doofus psychopathic idiot perspective, wouldn't a large gathering outside a school on a publicly planned day be an ...


2

I know it's unusual for an answer this far down in the list to get sufficient notice to have an impact, but I think my thoughts on this are distinct from those given above, and therefore worth sharing - Think of a child's world like a microcosm. At birth, their world is really only themselves. Over time it expands to include mommy and daddy and the house ...


1

First you should get your child interested (and they seem to be already), and then you should give them background on ways to rationally think about the news. It is more important at this time to teach the children to think rather than to just expose to the current scoop. What I do with my kid when some subject piques his interest, is to use a platform they ...


1

Understanding the past is key to understanding the present. I would start by seeking out some age-appropriate world history material - either curriculum (more efficient), or a small number of hand-picked documentaries or even just hands-on conversation (more accessible) - and possibly expand into general social studies. Where current news is a fleeting ...


1

Get them to watch CNN... hahaha hahahah hahahahaha hahahahaha hahahahahaha No seriously Actually it's more important to teach them principles and questioning things. Explain things to them verbally, or go through some newspaper articles with them, and question what is happening, and how it relates to the principles you teach them, and what is right and ...


1

Children often can't process the a straight news broadcast because they don't have the background knowledge to make sense of it, so they'll get bored and switch off. But there are other, more accessible ways of learning about current affairs. My kids will happily sit through a topical comedy or satirical show just for the silly jokes, and their social ...


1

It sounds like you want to avoid exposing your daughter to the worst of your mother's views, but you also want to spend time with your mother and don't want to end your visit altogether when she starts to discuss politics. Is it possible to compromise? When your mother starts discussing politics, take your daughter for a walk around the block. If she starts ...


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